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Thread: Books I Read This Summer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Southwestern Sheboygan, Wisconsin USA
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    1,504

    Default Books I Read This Summer

    As a nice chance of pace (for me) I found myself reading a lot more this summer vs spending time in front of the TV. My personal Summer Book Club included the following. I recommend any/all of these (esp if you read them through the eyes of a instructor looking for ways to enrich; motivate and transform his/her students):

    "The Greatness Guide" Robin Sharma
    "Chicken Soup For The Soul - Living Your Dreams" Canfield & Hansen
    "Drive" Daniel H. Pink
    "Transformation: Bill Phillips
    (Current Read) "Flow - The Psychology Of Optimal Experience" Csikszentmihalyi

    Just Cheeze Being Cheeze

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
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    We read you like a book, Cheeze. It is always good whenever you are here. Please stop by more often.
    SpinBob
    Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional
    Spotify

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Simi Valley, CA
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    1,836

    Default

    This summer I released my inner Bob Lee Swagger and read 'Point of Impact' and 'I Sniper' by Stephen Hunter. I released my inner Mitch Rapp with a Vince Flynn novel, too.

    I feel so shallow.

  4. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd S View Post
    This summer I released my inner Bob Lee Swagger and read 'Point of Impact' and 'I Sniper' by Stephen Hunter. I released my inner Mitch Rapp with a Vince Flynn novel, too.

    I feel so shallow.

    That's ok... I read Lauren Conrad's first book... She's the one girl off of the MTV show "The Hills". I felt pretty shallow after that one
    Kala
    Star 2 Spinning Instructor

  5. #5

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    For a graduation gift my son got the book 212 the extra degree by Sam Parker & Mac Anderson and to almost quote Cheeze: read through the eyes of an instructor looking for ways to enrich; motivate and transform his/her students

    The first page reads:

    At 211 degrees, water is hot.

    The second page:

    At 212 degrees it boils.

    It goes on to talk about that by raising the temperature one degree the water went from hot to something that generates enough force to power a machine. This is a great motivating read (analogy) about giving just a little more to gain so much.

    I definitely recommend it!

  6. #6

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    A fantstic book by a great author is 'It's All About The Bike' by Robert Penn - Rob tells of the journey he made in building his perfect bike but whilst writing about the hubs, saddle and rims he chose and why, he also goes in to a lot of history about the bike, how it evolved and how it shaped peoples lives.
    It's really fascinating and if you are keen on bikes but don't know it's history, you'll be exclaiming 'I never knew that!' every 5 pages. He also writes about the people who build the parts for his bike and describes the passion and dedication that they all have to making the best bike parts they can.

    I'm biased - I met Rob Penn last weekend and he's a lovely guy, his enthusiasm is boundless and his 'perfect' bike is beautiful. I didnt ask for a ride though!

  7. Default

    I'm reviving this thread to offer my own recommendation and see if anyone else has read anything good lately.

    For anyone looking for a fascinating read this summer, I just finished David Herlihy's The Lost Cyclist, which chronicles American Frank Lenz, who set off in 1892 to circumnavigate the globe on his bicycle, starting by cycling from New York City and heading west. As you can tell from the book title, he goes missing. It's a really entertaining adventure story, and you get the sense of the real dangers these early "globe girdlers" faced in their pursuit of glory. I also really appreciated the descriptions of the bikes (and racing) as bikes evolved: After being a champion high-wheel racer, Frank was one of the first to use a "safety bicycle"; Even so, the sheer weight of the bike plus his gear should make any "weight weenie" sweat.

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    To add to anyone's 2013 summer reading list: Richard Moore's Slaying the Badger: LeMond, Hinault, and the Greatest Ever Tour de France. It begins with a fascinating character sketch/career history of both Hinault and LeMond, culminating in their battle for 1st in the 1986 Tour de France. As someone who wasn't quite following the TdF in the mid-80s, it was a great introduction into that era of professional cycling.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    west midlands uk
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    I read French revolutions by Tim Moore. It's about a man who decided to ride the tour de France route ahead of the race itself without any preparation and completely unassisted. I also read Boy Racer which is Mark Cavandish's autobiography and Free Country about 2 friends who rode from lands End to John O'groats (length of the U.K.) without any money or equipment, just relying on the people that they met and their generosity. They didn't even have clothes or bikes when the started out

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    I loved French Revolutions--actually, anything by Tim Moore is hilarious (he also wrote a great book about walking the Camino de Santiago with a donkey). I'm looking forward to reading Cavendish's second autobiography when it comes out, and I've got Nicholas Roche's autobiography on my bookshelf waiting for me. I really enjoyed watching him at the Vuelta this past summer.

    I would love to ride Lands End to John O'Groats one day, but universally every description of that ride I've ever read it has gone into great detail about biking through the soaking cold rain through Scotland, day after day. Turns out maybe I'm more of a fair weather rider than I thought.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    west midlands uk
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    the one about the camino is next on my list to read. Most of my family live in that region of Spain and I'd love to do the Camino myself one day (minus the donkey). free country is funny and definitely worth a read. If you've got a kindle you can borrow it for free or buy it really cheap. It also tells of riding in rubbish weather in Scotland....and really busy roads in places.

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