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Thread: Spinning at 45-50 RPMs?

  1. #23
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    But isn't the point to coach our participants to reach the guidelines of safe and effective pedal stroke?? Or have I been missing something for over 10 years???
    I also agree that if they cannot pedal at 60 out of the saddle, then stay in the saddle. I would have them work the 60 in terms of endurance rather than strength as endurance will get you out of the saddle and meeting the goal.

    There is no way, I would tell people they are not suited for cycle. My goodness, we've been here for years preaching that cycle is an activity that fits all; now there is a certain type of person who cannot come to cycle - I shudder!

    I used to have a lady who would pedal the whole class at 45RPMs with high resistance. I talked to her about the cadence guidelines and why I mix up the cadence and the purpose. She never came out the saddle, and never took on board my suggestion - she wouldn't even try. She rode from the minute she got on the bike to getting off (yes, warmup and CD) at 45rpms with a high resistance. After a while, I stopped with her as there was no point. I certainly didn't send her away feeling unaccomplished.
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  2. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by EuroD View Post
    There is no way, I would tell people they are not suited for cycle. My goodness, we've been here for years preaching that cycle is an activity that fits all; now there is a certain type of person who cannot come to cycle - I shudder!

    I used to have a lady who would pedal the whole class at 45RPMs with high resistance. I talked to her about the cadence guidelines and why I mix up the cadence and the purpose. She never came out the saddle, and never took on board my suggestion - she wouldn't even try. She rode from the minute she got on the bike to getting off (yes, warmup and CD) at 45rpms with a high resistance. After a while, I stopped with her as there was no point. I certainly didn't send her away feeling unaccomplished.
    Well, I think the real inference to draw would be that there are certain styles of riding that predispose the rider to injury rather than a certain type of person.....and the overload that comes with ultra low pedal speeds (and presumably the resistance to go with) would be one such instance.

    Now, taking your 45 rpm lady as an example, I'm going to suggest she was just pedalling slow......and if that's what suits her, let her have at it. Just for the heck of it, I took my stopwatch down to the basement and did a few minutes of a 45 rpm ballpark, adding resistance to make it feel somewhat meaningful (I've got more gumption than to really overload the flywheel just for idle curiosity) You know what, no way would this be at all sustainable for the full coarse of a class. Muscle fatigue would set in pretty quick.....as it does when fast twitch fibres are engaged to any degree.....a minute or two more maybe leg-wrestling the bike (and then stressing the ligaments and tendons) and I'd be done. I think I'd be done on a real bike on a real hill also (which is why I daren't try too many hill repeats at "SPIN room cadence" for fear of falling over.

    Back when I taught on the Keisers, one of my members was a chronic grinder.....not as low as 45 rpm but close to sub 60 rpm regardless of the profile I was cuing. She'd go at it like that for maybe 3 or 4 minutes.......then have to take resistance off and sit up for a bit and then back at it. She seemed happy enough but one day approached me and said she was disappointed she wasn't losing weight with SPINNING. After a few platitudes about it's about more than weight loss, I pointed out that she rarely follows the class schedule and, although she might feel like she's working hard, it's not something designed to imcrease strength or endurance.......or calorie burn, for that matter. Came back next class, leg wrestling just the same as usual...

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    Quote Originally Posted by EuroD View Post
    snip…
    There is no way, I would tell people they are not suited for cycle. My goodness, we've been here for years preaching that cycle is an activity that fits all; now there is a certain type of person who cannot come to cycle - I shudder!
    …snip
    Quote Originally Posted by Vivienne View Post
    snip…
    Well, I think the real inference to draw would be that there are certain styles of riding that predispose the rider to injury rather than a certain type of person.....and the overload that comes with ultra low pedal speeds (and presumably the resistance to go with) would be one such instance.
    …snip
    Agreed, Vivienne, most certainly there are styles of riding that will predispose the rider to injury, and if you cannot avoid the style, then you should avoid riding. However I do believe that there are people that should not be be riding. Period.

    As much as the IC instructor/manufacturer community would like to think that IC is an activity that suits everyone, it doesn't. There are people who should not be riding an upright bike because of the stress it places on their back (maybe they can get away with riding a recumbent bike, but I don't see many of those in IC classes…). There are other conditions that would make it advisable for someone to avoid cycling. And sometimes those conditions are not 'fixable' - no amount of strengthening of the core or other muscles will alleviate the condition sufficiently to allow cycling - at least without causing some further harm.
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  4. #26
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    And I got to use this last night - had a newbie and while I was setting her up she asked if I had any extra seats (huh??) - I noticed she was sitting on several towels. So I told the class as a whole about shifting their weight and went on to say that their sit bones should be on the two humps (for lack of a better word) of the saddle. At least 4 people shifted back on the saddle and it was like a eureka moment for them! Note to self: take nothing for granted.

  5. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarthaK View Post
    And I got to use this last night - had a newbie and while I was setting her up she asked if I had any extra seats (huh??) - I noticed she was sitting on several towels. So I told the class as a whole about shifting their weight and went on to say that their sit bones should be on the two humps (for lack of a better word) of the saddle. At least 4 people shifted back on the saddle and it was like a eureka moment for them! Note to self: take nothing for granted.

    WORD!!

    Have you ever helped someone adjust their saddle position after they'd heard you set up a newbie.....and when you say "Slide your arse back until you feel my hand" (yes, I put it there)....they get a whole other insight into what you were saying?

    And then you compute that this is someone who you'd done a set up on as a newbie a short time ago (I get that) .......

    And while you're doing this, someone pipes up about getting the class started or whatever, and you turn around to see someone who manifestly DOES NOT HAVE A CLUE ......but was in exactly the situation of these newbie types a while back ( who they're so impatient with right now )
    Last edited by Vivienne; 12-16-2015 at 01:10 PM.

  6. #28
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    Oh Viv you make me laugh out loud! Fortunately, I have some very polite people who just pedal away while I'm setting someone up.

  7. #29
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    I guess it's a case of the incongruous tending to stick in my mind, Martha.......most of my regulars, in fact, start their own warm-up as soon as they're on the bike. I have pre-class music already playing and even when there is this sort of distraction at the appointed class start, I'm not so distracted that I haven't started the actual class music and dimmed the overhead lights (surely a signal, right?) within less than a minute or two.

    As much as I prefer new members to arrive a few minutes early for set-up and orientation etc., I make the best of it when they don't and set them up with the mic on because I can pretty much gua-RON-tee that there are plenty of folk who've received "gonie" and "bob's attention but after a few classes look as if they've referred to Barnum & Bailey's bike set-up guidelines rather than the SPINNING program's.

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