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Thread: Why work out in the lower Heart Rate Zones?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd S View Post
    This may help, too.

    Attached are the 'zones' accepted by USA Cycling for power training (they also give ballpark HR references) and corresponding physiological adaptations that can be expected when training in these respective zones.
    Thank you for these, Todd. I'll find them useful.
    “euphoric fitness – a state where every fiber of your being is awake, aware, alive but within it all, you find calm."

  2. #13
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    For most this will be a valuable addition to your library, too.

    Again, the focus is on training by power but the rest is like a Cliff Notes on training and cycling-related physiology basics. If nothing else, the bibliography is extremely valuable for those with an interest to dig deeper.

    (saved as two files to get under the attachment file size limit)
    Attached Files Attached Files

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    Thanks Todd!

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    Slightly off topic but if you have the ability to either workout at home on a trainer/spinning bike or have access to one in a gym outside of a class, the Aerobase Builder DVD's from the Spinervals series are fantastic videos for working out in the aerobic zone.

    The first four volumes are about an hour and twenty minutes long and then there are some other ones that are long, with one being 3 hours. I've haven't done the 3 hour session yet, but have found the others really helpful and definitely they keep you motivated.

    I also have done some of the videos from Spinning.com, but the aerobic ones are a little shorter, about 45 minutes. They are nice when I have less time, but I prefer the longer Spinervals videos when I have the time.

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    I'm bumping this thread......not because I have anything worthwhile to add, mind.

    Couldn't sleep last night (guess I'm overexcited about going out to visit Dr. Baby tomorrow) so, per my usual MO when there's not a tremendous amount going on, I scroll back and re-read stuff. On the principle that, if I find it interesting to re-read stuff, someone else might. Better yet, someone who's never read it before will glean something useful.

    With thanks to Todd etc....

    Vivienne
    Last edited by Vivienne; 02-01-2013 at 05:28 AM. Reason: Bumping thread again

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    Another thread worth a read

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    I found your list very helpful & concrete. I knew it was good to train in your lower HR zones, but it's great to have this explanation to rely on.

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    Perhaps the best contribution to this forum and specifically to this question was Todd's attached pdf from Dr. Stephen Seiler & Espen Tennessen on "Intervals, Thresholds, and Long Slow Distance: the Role of Intensity and Duration in Endurance Training." (See first page of this thread). If you are a voracious researcher, you will also appreciate the 3 full pages of other documented studies and reports that are at the end of the article as well. I recommend every cycling instructor or outdoor coach read this article at least twice to get probably the most balanced and well supported analysis of this "debate" on low-zone training vs HIT. I oversimplified it of course by categorizing it that way, but you get the idea. There are pros and cons of both but also well documented reasons to support both. Read that article and decide for yourself. Be a thinking instructor and coach. Be your own researcher. Use Evidence Based Cycling with your own lab and your own subjects - meaning you and only you to start with.
    Gene (Gino) Nacey
    Master Heart Zones Instructor
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    Owner, Global Ride Training Center &
    Global Ride Productions (virtual cycling DVDs)
    Founder, Cycling Fusion

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  9. #20
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    .... and always keep in mind the first question you have to ask - How much time per week does the individual have to devote to training? Low intensity and little time devoted to training is a waste of time. Always pushing high intensities at high volume can also be counterproductive when the individuals ability to recover is exceeded. The typical spinning class participant trainiing 3 - 6 hrs a week can and should train with much higher relative average intensity than the serious athlete training for 12 - 20 hrs per week.
    Last edited by Todd S; 02-22-2013 at 11:52 AM. Reason: Added "relative average" in bold underlined

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    I'm curious Todd, what is it you think the average spinning class participant is training for? I suggest that the Challenge of trying to to stay in the lower heart rate zones during a one hour spinning class is a good exercise. Well delivered the spinning class participant will be amazed at what a good work out they got. Moreover, rather than dragging themselves from class they will leave invigorated.

    I must end this however by pointing out the obvious which is; most of them just came to have you help them through a tough 45 or 60 minutes of exercise. Low zone, high zone make it interesting and relevant. They'll follow.
    Chuck Cali
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  11. #22
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    Sorry. I was simply referring to participants looking for the greatest fitness gains in the limited amount of time they have to train. I've always viewed things from my perspective as a goal oriented person. If one is looking for the "challenge of trying to stay in the lower heart rate zones", then he or she should be free to do so. But there's no avoiding the simple fact that for fitness gains to occur, there has to be modest overload along with recovery for physical overcompensation to occur. While exercising in lower heart rate zones for the length of a typical spinning class may leave one invigorated, this type of class offers neither the necessary stress or recovery required for someone even just moderately fit to improve their conditioning.

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