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Thread: Why work out in the lower Heart Rate Zones?

  1. #23
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    What is our job ?

    Lower HR training or the LSD training need a lot of time to stress the bodycertainly not what we can provide in an IDC session training.

    Now do we have to avoid it ? I do not think so.
    I go back to my first question, what is our job ? Instructor, coach or both ? What is the difference between an instructor and a coach ? What are similar ? EDUCATION.
    Spending some time in lower intensity can be usefull and let is not forget that when you work really hight end intensity you spend most of your training session in the lower one.
    And be a better coach by being able to teach different level of intensities to differents riders need, it is not always possible but it have to be an option. I mostly have regular in my classes, so I have learn to know them, theyr goals, theyr training and to read theyr bodies when they need to push harder or slow it. It regulary happen that I ask some to slow and even told them that not to ride !!! I just advice a regular not to come Friday because she NEED a rest.

  2. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd S View Post
    Sorry. I was simply referring to participants looking for the greatest fitness gains in the limited amount of time they have to train. I've always viewed things from my perspective as a goal oriented person. If one is looking for the "challenge of trying to stay in the lower heart rate zones", then he or she should be free to do so. But there's no avoiding the simple fact that for fitness gains to occur, there has to be modest overload along with recovery for physical overcompensation to occur. While exercising in lower heart rate zones for the length of a typical spinning class may leave one invigorated, this type of class offers neither the necessary stress or recovery required for someone even just moderately fit to improve their conditioning.
    If you look at one class in a vacuum, your statement is correct. If you consider even a modest frequency of 3 days per week, and a solid 6 to 8 weeks of this type of training, you will most certainly see many people reaching a variety of goals. As much as you know about physiology, I find it hard to believe that you would think a person doing this would not have an improved cardiovascular condition at the end of those 6 to 8 weeks. Not just improved conditioning, but they are also much better prepared to begin more intense training now that they have a better foundation to work from.

    I find many instructors avoid this more because they don't understand how it can help, never having been disciplined enough to stick with a program long enough (with pre and post measurement) to have a first hand experience of its benefits. Then add to that not knowing how to make it less boring - clearly higher intensity provides more endorphines and more opportunities for higher energy and entertainment - and you have a built in reticence to do it.

    I posit that if you get a group to stick with a structured plan for even one season, (with an instructor that KNOWS how to keep it interesting and challenging), you will have them coming back and asking for more year after year.
    Gene (Gino) Nacey
    Master Heart Zones Instructor
    Spinning Instructor
    USA Cycling Coach
    Owner, Global Ride Training Center &
    Global Ride Productions (virtual cycling DVDs)
    Founder, Cycling Fusion

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  3. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by liveon2wheels View Post
    If you look at one class in a vacuum, your statement is correct. If you consider even a modest frequency of 3 days per week, and a solid 6 to 8 weeks of this type of training, you will most certainly see many people reaching a variety of goals. As much as you know about physiology, I find it hard to believe that you would think a person doing this would not have an improved cardiovascular condition at the end of those 6 to 8 weeks. Not just improved conditioning, but they are also much better prepared to begin more intense training now that they have a better foundation to work from.

    I find many instructors avoid this more because they don't understand how it can help, never having been disciplined enough to stick with a program long enough (with pre and post measurement) to have a first hand experience of its benefits. Then add to that not knowing how to make it less boring - clearly higher intensity provides more endorphines and more opportunities for higher energy and entertainment - and you have a built in reticence to do it.

    I posit that if you get a group to stick with a structured plan for even one season, (with an instructor that KNOWS how to keep it interesting and challenging), you will have them coming back and asking for more year after year.
    I can't see where we disagree. What I hear you saying is that any regular physical activity is better than no regular physical activity.

    IMHO, the skilled instructor should be able to incorporate the opportunity for a wide variety of individual exercise intensity levels in any given class.

  4. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd S View Post
    I can't see where we disagree. What I hear you saying is that any regular physical activity is better than no regular physical activity.
    .
    As always, with a caveat......provided the customer is always happy

    I don't have the good fortune to have a group of class members commited to a progressive styled class. That's not to say I don't teach that.....remember The Year Of The Athlete......but I'm still stuck with casual drop-ins, drive by's and folk who're "just checking out my music" in addition to my Team Honey Badger crew.

    A low relative intensity (aka Lower Heart Rate Zone) is absolutely the right way to go for brand-new-to-exercise/brand-new-to-IDC-members.....and those coming back after a long lay-off.....and those who're rehabbing from an injury.....and those who don't fancy working too hard today for whatever reason etc. etc. Here's one of the insights I offer up to everyone else. The bicycle was devised as a way to get from A to B in an easier way than walking or running could provide and was cheaper than keeping a horse.....so, if you're pedalling along at less than a *brisk walking pace* (i.e. breaking a sweat and not feeling like yapping too much) you'd prolly be better off walking seeing as there's the added benefit of a weight bearing exercise mode.

    Truth be told, I don't think that most folk coming to my class are there because they're prepared to sit on a glorified log-splitter, listening to my choice of music (which, as I've been informed, some people don't like) just to have something that's *Better Than Nothing*......given what *Nothing* actually is (or isn't)

    Granted, they might want FUN (sorry, if this is your idea fun....) but I suspect they all want results. Come to that, results that might not even be attainable for them in their time frame with Intelligent Challenge let alone stuff that's not likely to work in the first place.

  5. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vivienne View Post
    A low relative intensity (aka Lower Heart Rate Zone) is absolutely the right way to go for brand-new-to-exercise/brand-new-to-IDC-members......
    Low intensity is actually your only option for these folks. Anything more intense and they won't last for a 45 - 60 minute class. In terms of relative intensity for the deconditioned, low intensity is high intensity.

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    I use low HR zones (1 and 2) the day after a hard ride as a recovery aid.

  7. #29

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    Technique training

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