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Thread: need computer help

  1. Default need computer help

    Hi,

    I'm new to the Keiser computers, but have been an spin instructor for many years. I have the Keiser manual but can not find any real info about how to teach to the computer. Cadence I understand. Watts I do not - someone told me the base line is the riders weight ?? I understand the higher the number the harder the workout - but what range do I give my class. Then what about the Kcal ?
    thanks, MLC

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlc View Post
    Hi,

    I'm new to the Keiser computers, but have been an spin instructor for many years. I have the Keiser manual but can not find any real info about how to teach to the computer. Cadence I understand. Watts I do not - someone told me the base line is the riders weight ?? I understand the higher the number the harder the workout - but what range do I give my class. Then what about the Kcal ?
    thanks, MLC
    I hate to respond with a *read the posts* .... but, if you scroll through the various threads on this Keiser forum, you'll get a ton of info to help you more than a single response could.

    You're correct. Cadence is self explanatory ..... doesn't mean that riders will accept that, mind. Truth be told, this is the only metric other than time that you can realistically prescribe/suggest/hope for...

    The watts/bodyweight is a little more tricky. *Watts* per pound bodyweight is just one metric to anchor around. FWIW, I only ever used it as a cue during warm-up.

    I suggest that you ride these bikes a few times on your own and with the RPE or whatever cue for exertion you gave when you had no computer feedback.....that'll tell you something.

    Kcals .... this is an opportunity to poke merciless fun at the folk who manufacture devices to con gullible folk into believing that you can aid weight management with inaccurate numbers.

    It's all there in the posts on the Keiser forum.

  3. #3

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    I explain watts to my class this way...watts in the cycling studio is analogous to weight in the weight room. Its an absolute measure of how much work you are doing and you can do more watts/weight for shorter periods of time/fewer reps than for longer periods/higher reps. RPM or resistance (gear) don't provide that by themselves. Watts does. Watts are the "horsepower" of your engine (incidentally 1 horsepower = ~745 watts).

    So in response to the question of "what should my watts be?" I generally respond that it should be:
    1. Not so much that you will hurt yourself
    2. Appropriate for your fitness goals
    3. Maybe a bit more than last time.

    All of which you would could say about weight in the weight room. Think of them the same way. And if that seems a little vague it should be. Target watts for a time period will be different for everyone in your studio depending on their fitness levels, as would the weights we put on the bar if we were in that setting.

    To push the analogy further. If you were going to the weight room to begin a lifting program you would probably start with something that was really easy and gradually increase until it was moderately difficult and then begin working up from there. The same process will work for watts.

    Watts/kilogram of body weight is an excellent predictor of how someone will fare in a bike race. Untrained or minimally trained cyclists will be in the mid 3's for an all-out 5 min effort. A world class cyclist might be able to do 8. All of that may or may not be relevant to your class members.

    You can see an example of Andy Coggan's watts/kg chart at http://www.cyclinganalytics.com/blog...he-power-curve.

    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by SamIAm; 07-23-2014 at 06:01 PM.

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    WRT the watts and bodyweight thang, I was thinking more along the lines of the Cycling Fusion take on how to describe an intensity for someone sitting on a bike that doesn't fall over when U GETZ IT RONG.

    Truth be told Watts (per James/physics lab parameters) as opposed to watts (Keiser/wattever you want) aren't necessarily the same animals.

    I've tried pretty much everything WRT the Keiser take on this (with the help of Gino) and the only reason I suggested the OP consult the Keiser posts is that I've given examples of the multiple times where watt I though might work actually didn't ..... and why.

    For me, I don't have too many Europeans coming to my classes and looking to see how they'd fare in a bike race that's designed for *elites*. Heck, I'm not too convinced tat some of my crew even really want to get a bit fitter than they are right now. However, I'm very well accustomed to folk who want to know what they *should* be doing and maybe *why*..... even if they're not going to do it.

    I guess Andy Coggan might even look at what I'm trying to achieve and laugh all the way back to the lab where he works with elite athletes and opines on that sort of info...

    I get no benefit from providing this info (other than knowing that I'm giving good advice) but Gino's training tools WRT bodyweight and wattage and watt it all means are worth way more than the minimal $$$cost of purchasing the Cycling Fusion workbooks etc. If I add it all up, I've certainly given all the secrets away in my Keiser posts..
    Last edited by Vivienne; 07-24-2014 at 10:37 AM.

  5. #5
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    I mentioned "warm up" intensity upstream and I think this is a really good example of how to test for yourself how what you're cuing ought to feel for the average class attendee.

    Given that most of the members at my Keiser gig didn't wear HRM, I'd cue early warm up intensity as something that'd give them a power output equal to something between 1/4-1/2 their bodyweight in watts per lb. Checking this for myself, I'd be somewhere in the region of 60 watts or so at about 85 rpm (this wasn't a gym with a dedicated cycle studio so given that each bike might be different.....) I hover around128-130lbs so, in this instance the specific cue matched the intensity I was trying to convey. If you add 1 or 2 "gears" to this you'll get what I call a "basement" intensity that you can anchor whole workouts around and build from.

    This was about the only time I was ever specific about what intensity "ought" to be.....because everyone's warm-up ought to start out easy-peasy, right. The incongruous thing was that the very folk who manifestly weren't trying too hard to follow these particular cues (that's not unusual I find.......very few folk really respect the warm up for what it is) would be the ones who'd keep pestering to know what "gear" they should be on.

    Thinking about it now, I really envy you the opportunity you have to work with these bike computers. The folk who enjoyed working with them really appreciated my style of teaching but I fancy most folk were there to just spin their wheels in the belief/hope that anything's better than nothing.......and those who're disappointed are always the most vocal.

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