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Thread: What to do about a sheared pedal?

  1. #1

    Default What to do about a sheared pedal?

    Hi, all!

    I'm new to this forum, but I was hoping you all might be able to help me out. I have a Spinner Elite at home that I purchased in 2009 from Studio Cycles to help with rehab after ACL surgery. Yesterday morning, I was doing my work out (standing climb) and the left pedal came off. I'm fine but it's not something that can be re-attached, the metal is sheared. My husband and I use the bike all the time. Any ideas on how I can get it fixed? I have read all the threads about probable causes of such a thing--but I couldn't find anything about how to get it fixed.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,576

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    You may just be able to unscrew the threaded piece from the crank arm and then all you would need to do is get a new pedal. Otherwise you will need to replace crank arm and the pedal. Taking off the crank arm requires a special tool, which you can get at a bike shop. www.sportsmith.net is where I get parts for my SpinnerⓇ .
    SpinBob
    Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional
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  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks, very helpful. I looked at sportsmith.com after some consultation, and ordered a tool set and the part I needed. I'll let you know how the repair goes when it gets here.

    Thanks again!

  4. #4

    Default All fixed up!

    Quote Originally Posted by KB3 View Post
    Thanks, very helpful. I looked at sportsmith.com after some consultation, and ordered a tool set and the part I needed. I'll let you know how the repair goes when it gets here.

    Thanks again!
    I got the part, and found a local bike mechanic to do the fix. He said that it was clearly a manufacturing issue, and was glad no one got hurt. thanks for the input!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Golden, Colorado
    Posts
    2,755

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    Glad everything got sorted out. I was sort of hoping you'd give it a shot yourself and report back. I have as close to zero mechanical skills as is possible and I don't particularly hanker for getting greasy and oily to acquire more, so I'd always choose to get someone else to take care of an issue like this. I do like to have a clue how stuff works though. Did you watch what your mechanic did when he replaced your pedal? Was it easy enough that you could do it yourself in a pinch?

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vivienne View Post
    Glad everything got sorted out. I was sort of hoping you'd give it a shot yourself and report back. I have as close to zero mechanical skills as is possible and I don't particularly hanker for getting greasy and oily to acquire more, so I'd always choose to get someone else to take care of an issue like this. I do like to have a clue how stuff works though. Did you watch what your mechanic did when he replaced your pedal? Was it easy enough that you could do it yourself in a pinch?

    Yeah, it wasn't something he could do with a general bike repair kit, and it required that he bring some specialized tools from the shop and pretty much dismantle what I'm going to call the "power train" and then reassemble the bike. The metal "axle" between the pedals had broken in two. That's really all I know.

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