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Thread: How to encourage participants to get HR monitors?

  1. Question How to encourage participants to get HR monitors?

    I teach at our local YMCA. We are doing a fundraiser to purchase spinning computers for our bikes. I am excited to be able to use them when teaching and would like to include coaching based on HR. Our participants have been reluctant to purchase bike shoes, so I can imagine that will jump on board the HR bandwagon. How do I encourage members to invest in HR monitors?

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    My workout place is trying to encourage us to get heart rate monitors. The technology is a bit hit and miss with our bike computers but seems to work well with some phones. Perhaps you could get a projector and project your heart rate while wearing to show folks how to maximize their ride. Maybe also team up with local retail for a demonstration (EMS, REI, etc.)

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    My best advice to encourage use of heart rate monitors is for the instructor to demonstrate a knowledge base, skill set and understanding of the rational (and irrational) use of the device.......FWIW, an understanding of cardiovascular physiology is mandatory

    Hasn't worked for me yet, mind you. Peeps do luv them calories burned feature

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    I have found the case for investing in a HR monitor is easiest for those who are serious about losing weight and want to do a better job of tracking calories burned against their calorie consumption. They are also seen as a worthy investment for those who want to find out why they are not losing weight despite their workouts. The majority of my big box gym riders are focused on weight loss, weight management and general health issues and less on developing riding skills, strength and endurance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by laurasantos View Post
    I have found the case for investing in a HR monitor is easiest for those who are serious about losing weight and want to do a better job of tracking calories burned against their calorie consumption. .
    But you know that's wrong ......right??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vivienne View Post
    But you know that's wrong ......right??
    Even though the monitor doesn't give an accurate calories burned number, I agree with Laura (hope that's your first name!) that using the heart rate monitor correctly does help with weight loss and weight management. I used to tell folks who were obsessed with that feature never to trust that they had actually burned any more than *half* of the display if they were on a machine on the cardio floor or 2/3 if it is your personal HRM. I didn't give those fractions as an attempt to get something more accurate, but just to prevent them thinking they could eat a couple of big macs cuz the HRM said I burned a bajillion cals zomg!
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    I never push riders to have cycling short, cycling shoes or HR ... I have mostly in each give a words or two about the reasons why and I show what I preach so HRM, cycling shoes and cycling short. If people feel forced in any kind of way at long term you would lost BUT if it comes from them ... you did not win an HUGE battle.
    I have seen that the biggest "seller" are the regulars riders. If you have build a strong based of knowledgeable and non competitive riders, they would be better heard by some newer riders.

    Groupfitpower you are right people would buy anything that would told them something about weight lose ... but as Vivienne remark those numbers are not real, is using that argument to "sell" HRM valuable ? Yes and no, I would not use that argument because I would contradictive my thought and coaching principle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by groupfitpower View Post
    Even though the monitor doesn't give an accurate calories burned number, I agree with Laura (hope that's your first name!) that using the heart rate monitor correctly does help with weight loss and weight management.!
    Used correctly it is a weight loss aid ..... but the calories burned feature is the biggest con trick out since the algorithm the devices use has heart rate as a metric and that's a measure of cardiovascular response not a measure of absolute work done. I swear I've had members actually getter fatter on my watch by trusting the HRM over my advice.

    The best way to see a nice high calorie burn is to get out of shape with couple of weeks va-cay and then do all those crazy moves that folk do to "get their heart rate up"......or, say, switch the HRM on during a white knuckle car drive in heavy snow!

    The most out-of-shape riders get the highest calorie burn for any work load ......so, someone who's only putting about 100W average to the pedals and is working at their max effort could easily get something close to a couple hundred Cals overestimate for an hours class. Then, if you factor in that their NEAT (spontaneous movement) might slow for the rest of the day......as it does for me per my pedometer when I've done a serious workout and greater hunger because of glycogen depletion and then the "I deserve it" factor on top and wallop you have a weight loss stall or even gain.

    I've actually plotted my return to fitness via my HRM .......using a diminishing Calorie burn for the same level of exertion ..... as an example of how useless a tool the Calorie burn feature is.

    A Pox on whoever thought up the Calorie burn feature

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    Here's another way for skeptical members to test for themselves..

    Either the bike (if you have power) or treadmill if not ......this is one I suggest because you set the speed and it goes. Shortish warm up and then a pace that's sustainable but reasonably challenging. If they have monitors with lap "average" features get them to get an average calorie burn, say every 5 minutes......switching off and then back on will do the same. You'll find that, as cardiac drift starts to kick in and HR becomes decoupled from effort, that calorie burn starts to get really impressive by about the 30 minute mark.....especially if you get a treadmill away from the fans.......even though the speed and consequently METs stay the same. FWIW, this was one of the first things I noticed when I started using an HRM and I then realized there's more to HRM training than heart rate.

    Physiology. It's a science for a reason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by laurasantos View Post
    I have found the case for investing in a HR monitor is easiest for those who are serious about losing weight and want to do a better job of tracking calories burned against their calorie consumption. They are also seen as a worthy investment for those who want to find out why they are not losing weight despite their workouts. The majority of my big box gym riders are focused on weight loss, weight management and general health issues and less on developing riding skills, strength and endurance.
    There's a real error in understanding HRM usage here that's likely to be more of a barrier to success than a help.

    You don't have to interact with too many folk with weight management issues to realize that there's a lot of misinformation out there and folk are only to willing to glom onto it. I've started to attend a lot more nutrition and weight management CECs for my dental license these days and it's incredible how memes can develop into sound theory at the hands of the hucksters.

    I don't know whether anyone else has noticed, but we're again currently in a wave of blockbuster best seller diet books and movies that seem to be focused on telling the public that everything they've been told is wrong....... of course, there wouldn't be much traction in common sense advice, so I can see you'd need to think up a bit of fancy flim-flam. The demon now is that advice to reduce saturated fat in the diet was all wrong ...... as if the obesity epidemic is due to folk following the Dean Ornish quasi vegan route or cutting out avocados and coconut oil as opposed to just eating more but feeling good because SnackWell cookies and Big Gulps of soda are "low fat".

    One of the big things now is to try to somehow argue against basic energy balance.....i.e. Cals in vs Cals out. ......as if opining that Laws of Thermodynamics don't apply is somehow iconoclastic and thoughtful. Thermodynamics works plenty well in my household. Eat a bit more and exercise a bit less and I gain weight. To lose it, I need to eat less than I want and move a bit more. Works like a charm.....every time ..... PROVIDED (and here's the kicker) I'm honest with what goes in and how much is getting burned. Anything that tinkers too much with accurate information (or commonsense) in this vital area pretty much gua-RON-tees a lack of success.

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