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Thread: Why your club demands that YOU DO NOT TALK TO THE MEDIA!

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Why your club demands that YOU DO NOT TALK TO THE MEDIA!

    If you teach at Life Time Fitness (or most any other Big Box... and I'll bet Soulcycle as well) you were asked to agree to a work under a code of conduct. As part of that agreement, you're instructed not to talk to the media. For good reason.

    Reporters often have a specific agenda that they want to promote through an article they're writing. To give the article legitimacy, they will often seek out someone that they can quote in the article. If the article is about fitness/weight loss, etc... they'll try to find someone who has branded themselves as an "expert" who'll agree to be quoted or they'll find someone connected with a respected organization; i.e. your club or studio.

    Except often times they'll present themselves on one side of an issue, but their real intent is to write the article on the opposite side - except they won't tell you that. No. They'll stroke your ego (reporters are trained to do that to get you to talk) and make you feel important.

    Most of us are wise to flattery and not affected by it, yet some unfortunately are not. Some will quickly cave to the thought they will be quoted by some important media outlet and give no thought to the things they say.

    The media representative at your organisation has a lot of experience and training dealing with the media. They know to stick to their message (or talking points) and will not be influenced by a reporter's tricks and/or manipulations.

    Here's a great illustration of an author with an agenda, looking for someone they can quote out of context. We all need to; A: learn to run away from these people or B: hang up on when they call. http://www.harpersbazaar.com/beauty/...g-you-fat-0913

  2. #2

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    I have to admit, I kind of feel bad for the folks quoted in the article. I mean, really? All of these tenured "experts" agree that Spinning makes you fat? It's ridiculous. But, on the bright side, I don't think anyone is reading Harper's Bazaar for fitness tips. The audience of that magazine isn't interested in getting fit. I'm not sure what they are interested in, but somehow, I don't think the blood sweat and tears of hard work is part of their day-to-day. Feel free to correct me, if any of you with a subscription.
    sometimes low self-esteem is earned. it's the correct response if you are not trying your best. do something about it. - Michael Koppelman

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  3. #3
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    Krista I checked and their paper subscribers number ~700,000 and their website sees around a million visitors a month.

  4. #4
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    I saw their main points as being....

    "First, depending on the body you start with, indoor cycling may not get you the body you want."

    and...

    "Not everybody responds to the same exercise stimuli the same way,"

    and...

    "No discussion of gaining weight and bulking up would be complete without considering diet."

    I can't say that I disagree. I guess being able to quote a bunch of experts is just an easy way to support the arguments.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by admin View Post
    Krista I checked and their paper subscribers number ~700,000 and their website sees around a million visitors a month.
    I think Krista's point was that the readers of Harper's Bazaar are buying it for reasons other than fitness advice, regardless of their number. Fashion is the selling point for that product and the story really didn't cover exercise fashion.
    SpinBob
    Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional
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    I agree with you Bob-this is shit in a handbag, but many people will see this, and incorporated through the their tiny little brains filter much less. We keep fighting the good fight.

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    I didn't really think the article was all that bad, and isn't something we've never heard before. I've had INSTRUCTORS tell me their butt is getting bigger from teaching.

    I think Jennifer Sage hit the nail right on the head - I loved her quote. But then, I'm a proponent of cross training and lift weights 4-5 days per week; I tend to agree that doing too much Spinning, especially at higher intensities (which, let's face it, most of our participants "want") can increase my hunger and cravings to the point that they are much harder to control.

    I think people believe what they want to believe and while this article might make them stop and think, if they love indoor cycling and are getting results, they're going to keep coming. The fitness world is fickle.
    Tracy
    Michigan
    STAR3 Certified Spinning Instructor

  8. Default

    Surprised no one commented on the article photo of a model STANDING ON A CONVENTIONAL BIKE BACKWARDS! Sort of compromises the article's credibility from the get go. I must say that I have worked with Harley Pasternak in the past and find him to be eminently knowledgeable about fitness.

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    you mean i should stop believing what i read in the "national enquirer" ? All kidding aside, media will can shape a story any way they see fit. However, at times I think most of us do that.

  10. Default

    This is the stuff that should be making us angry: An article in a fitness magazine, about how to prevent injuries. For indoor cycling, they interview some SoulCycle instructor on ways to avoid common injuries. Although the article correctly notes that knee injuries would be your major injury threat, notice that nothing at all is mentioned about using sufficient resistance. http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/worko...injury/?page=5

  11. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tarah View Post
    This is the stuff that should be making us angry: An article in a fitness magazine, about how to prevent injuries. For indoor cycling, they interview some SoulCycle instructor on ways to avoid common injuries. Although the article correctly notes that knee injuries would be your major injury threat, notice that nothing at all is mentioned about using sufficient resistance. http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/worko...injury/?page=5
    Agreed - they make it sound *so simple* (<--- sarcasm.)
    Tracy
    Michigan
    STAR3 Certified Spinning Instructor

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