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Thread: What's your go-to pre/post w/o nutrition?

  1. Question What's your go-to pre/post w/o nutrition?

    Short answer for me... before class: raw almonds, or egg (hard-boiled, or whole wheat scrambled egg sandwich)... after class: banana (&+H2O, given).

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    I ask this because I had a student (and have had others in the past) ask me: "so what's your advice on what to eat before and after class"? She was curious what my response would be after listening to another teacher's advice on what to eat (which was basically advertising her friend's restaurant, that everyone should go spend $ out to eat there, as THE best nutrition, lol...oh my). Personally, I do not care for all these "shake-selling" people at the gym either, or the notion there of (or take a pill in place of your nutrition). I think the wholest foods are the best.

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    ***technical note*** ...is it just my compuer? or can you not use the "enter" key to space your text in the posting field? ...sorry, I would have sectioned out my type, but I couldn't get it to work... I hate it when there is too much text, with no paragraph spacing in between to read it... gets confusing... thanks.

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    Depends on the workout... IMO, there's no real need for anything special or extra for a 45 - 60 min spin class. I will occasionally go with chocolate milk or a greek yogurt/fruit smoothie of some sort after a longer workout or training session.
    Inner Drive Cycling|Fitness Studio
    Indoor Cycling|Functional Fitness|Multisport Coaching & Club
    www.innerdrivestudio.com

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    Thanks for your input, InnerDrive.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
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    2,576

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    I agree with Inner Drive in regards to teaching or participating in a SpinningⓇ class. My class is Sunday morning at 8:30 a.m., so I usually just roll out of bed, grab a cup of coffee and go. After class I usually make a turkey bacon and scrambled egg sandwich on a wheat bagel when I get home and read the paper.

    For training purposes, I really don't start to worry about workout nutrition unless I will be going 75 to 90 minutes or longer.
    SpinBob
    Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional
    Spotify

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    Thanks, SpinBob, for the reply. These gals that asked me are on Weight Watchers, and trying to lose weight. So I think I will tell them it's not necessary to use up part of their calories for that. The one gal was asking about that 15minute window immediately following a work-out for muscle repair etc. Which I have heard that a lot, but I've never been one to really follow it. Other than when I was training heavily for a century event cycling outside. Then it was almost hard to get enough to eat.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by KarmaQueen View Post
    The one gal was asking about that 15minute window immediately following a work-out for muscle repair etc.
    I believe that your client was referring to the post-exercise "anabolic window" that high end endurance and power athletes experience from participating in multiple glycogen-depleting exercise sessions in a single day. Aerobics instructors who teach 2 or more challenging classes a day would be an example of a group of people who need to be concerned with the "anabolic window". However, preworkout nutrition impacts muscle repair greater than post-workout nutrition in all people, from the new formerly sedentary student who only attends cycle class 1-2 times/week to the seasoned Iron Man athlete.

    It takes 1-2 hours post meal consumption for plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations to peak and another 3-6 hours for plasma AA concentrations to return to baseline. So you can see that if someone were to workout without eating 1-3 hours before exercise that she would see greater muscle protein breakdown, and that if she had consumed a hearty meal 3-6 hours prior that plasma AA would still be high enough to support muscle protein synthesis. This also means that if she were to consume a carbohydrate and protein rich snack 30 minutes post class and had not eaten for more than 6 hours prior she could lose a very small amount of muscle because she had missed the "anabolic window" by 30 minutes. But for the average student, the possible muscle loss from exercising in a fasted state would be negligible because most people would not be able to work at a high enough intensity to damage the muscle tissue enough to require high levels of circulating AA.

    I recommend to my clients that they consume enough energy throughout the day and ensure that they have enough energy (in the form of calories not just caffeine) that they can complete a workout without bonking, crashing or fainting. I typically like for my clients to eat 20-40 g of protein and ~20-50 g of carbs 1-2 hours before we meet. I also recommend that my clients allow at least 30-60 minutes before starting their workout to prevent hypoglycemia, because high circulating insulin levels before and during exercise rapidly moves glucose out of circulating blood and can lead to extremely low blood sugar in susceptible individuals.

    Here is a link to one of Alan Aragon's articles that discusses the impact of pre- vs. post- workout carbohydrate, fat and protein intakes on muscle protein catabolism and synthesis.
    http://www.jissn.com/content/10/1/5

    M
    elanie Boney, RD

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,576

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    I am a lifetime member of Weight Watchers. As Weight Watcher members, they get points back for their exercise session, so if they eat sensibly before or after their workout, the exercise and food should, at worst, offset. I generally come out ahead with a Spinning class, even if I eat before or after class.
    SpinBob
    Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional
    Spotify

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by melboney View Post
    I believe that your client was referring to the post-exercise "anabolic window" that high end endurance and power athletes experience from participating in multiple glycogen-depleting exercise sessions in a single day. Aerobics instructors who teach 2 or more challenging classes a day would be an example of a group of people who need to be concerned with the "anabolic window". However, preworkout nutrition impacts muscle repair greater than post-workout nutrition in all people, from the new formerly sedentary student who only attends cycle class 1-2 times/week to the seasoned Iron Man athlete.

    It takes 1-2 hours post meal consumption for plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations to peak and another 3-6 hours for plasma AA concentrations to return to baseline. So you can see that if someone were to workout without eating 1-3 hours before exercise that she would see greater muscle protein breakdown, and that if she had consumed a hearty meal 3-6 hours prior that plasma AA would still be high enough to support muscle protein synthesis. This also means that if she were to consume a carbohydrate and protein rich snack 30 minutes post class and had not eaten for more than 6 hours prior she could lose a very small amount of muscle because she had missed the "anabolic window" by 30 minutes. But for the average student, the possible muscle loss from exercising in a fasted state would be negligible because most people would not be able to work at a high enough intensity to damage the muscle tissue enough to require high levels of circulating AA.

    I recommend to my clients that they consume enough energy throughout the day and ensure that they have enough energy (in the form of calories not just caffeine) that they can complete a workout without bonking, crashing or fainting. I typically like for my clients to eat 20-40 g of protein and ~20-50 g of carbs 1-2 hours before we meet. I also recommend that my clients allow at least 30-60 minutes before starting their workout to prevent hypoglycemia, because high circulating insulin levels before and during exercise rapidly moves glucose out of circulating blood and can lead to extremely low blood sugar in susceptible individuals.

    Here is a link to one of Alan Aragon's articles that discusses the impact of pre- vs. post- workout carbohydrate, fat and protein intakes on muscle protein catabolism and synthesis.
    http://www.jissn.com/content/10/1/5

    M
    elanie Boney, RD
    Excellent post, Mel!
    Inner Drive Cycling|Fitness Studio
    Indoor Cycling|Functional Fitness|Multisport Coaching & Club
    www.innerdrivestudio.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Golden, Colorado
    Posts
    2,755

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    Quote Originally Posted by KarmaQueen View Post
    Thanks, SpinBob, for the reply. These gals that asked me are on Weight Watchers, and trying to lose weight. So I think I will tell them it's not necessary to use up part of their calories for that. The one gal was asking about that 15minute window immediately following a work-out for muscle repair etc. Which I have heard that a lot, but I've never been one to really follow it. Other than when I was training heavily for a century event cycling outside. Then it was almost hard to get enough to eat.
    I have to field these questions every once in a while. Mel's excellent response nothwithstanding, are you sure they're asking about "nutrition" and nutrient timing.......or calories and energy balance (the Weight Watchers thing being one heads-up)

    I try to reinforce adequate nutrition (as in not making the mistake of thinking that they can realistically cut calories drastically in addition to working out and expect success) but at the same time to be aware that their *calorie burn* might not support a nutritional strategy such as you'd find on the pro peloton........and that there's an excellent chance that they haven't actually burned that mythical 500kcals in today's class.

    I do recommend they don't come to class starved (my classes are all 9 am) and a light post workout snack of protein and carbs as a way to prevent them wanting to raid the fridge for the rest of the day as a general principle......but I doubt many of my members put themselves in any danger of glycogen depletion/catabolism in any practical sort of way. I bring the topics up mainly as a way to dispel a lot of the myths that folk glom onto when they're trying to lose weight (on the assumption that if they were doing something that works, they wouldn't be asking me the question)

    On this topic, the current edition Of Scientific American is a special *Food* issue. I was travelling back from Colorado yesterday and picked it up at the airport. It's a worthwhile read covering stuff like GMO's, history of food processing, "calories" etc. etc. Of course, Gary Taubes managed to muscle his way in......with his usual inane take on endocrinology and "hormonal imbalance" that hasn't been revised since Good Calories, Bad Calories <<sigh>>

    Vivienne

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