Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 11 of 26

Thread: Cueing Resistance

  1. #1

    Default Cueing Resistance

    The gym I work at just got Keiser bikes this past Friday. I teach my 1st class this Thursday and am very excited to actually have a bike that computes info for me! Our old bikes were very simple "old skool" - no computers! 1 dial that wasn't numbered and we moved to right or left, feeling things out as we went along. I usually cue using a 1-10 scale with 10 being the most resistance you can handle and still have nice smooth circles (60 RPM). How do you cue for increasing/descreasing resistance with the Keiser computer? The resist. levels go from 1-24. Levels will vary for each participant based on health and fitness as to what their starting point is as well as their max. Just curious. Please share. One thought was to have everyone play with resistance before class starts. Find their max. Divide in half for moderate resist to get a feel for where they should be and what the different levels feel like. Then cue by simply explaining our goal, how many increases/decreases we'll have on our way to that goal so they can pace themselves....

  2. Default

    Continue cueing the way you do now. I have been teaching on the Keiser M3s for about 4 years now (?).

    The incremental increase in resistance for each increment of 'gear' is not identical. This is due to the shape of the magnet (circular) and the way it moves over the flywheel. The more surface area of the magnet is over the wheel, the more the resistance. Very roughly, think of it this way: The gears 1-8 will have smaller increases in resistance for each number increase than the gears 9-16. For each number increase in gear, there is a greater increase in the magnet's surface area that overlaps the flywheel. Gears 17-24 will be smaller increase, more similar to the gears 1-8.

    Also, you will have some variability between the bikes depending on how they have been calibrated. Cables stretch. Bikes get bumped and jarred.
    Work and train smart, not hard. But be smart enough to know that sometimes it does take hard work to accomplish your goals.

    Follow me on Twitter

  3. #3

    Default

    Thank you for feedback. I think I was over thinking a bit Get to sub tomorrow. Looking forward to a nice quiet ride on the new bikes!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Somewhere in the US
    Posts
    1,231

    Default

    When we first got our M3s, I wanted the participants to get a feel for the bike, let alone how to handle the gears. I took a good two weeks to acclimate my classes to setting up the bike particularly as there wasn't any fore and aft handlebars, and letting them play with the gears, whilst supporting a ride profile. They appreciated being allowed to 'do their own thing' whilst feeling the differences, which as noted can be subtle.
    Cycle Happy!
    EuroD
    Cycle Instructor Emeritus
    Star 3 Spinning Instructor
    Schwinn Certified Cycle Instructor
    AFAA Primary Certification
    Spotify

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Hunt Valley MD
    Posts
    133

    Default

    It is very important for people to get the feel of the bikes. We have had M3's for 2 1/12 yrs. Each of our instructors do things a little different. I kind of like to cue with power. It seems the each gear is increases power by about 20 watts. However in light of CycleGuy's, comments, I may look at that across the lower and higher gears. By increasing RPM's, power is also increased in smaller segments. Net for me, I can give riders to ability to increase power in different ways. This seems to work well for riders who like fast legs or others who to grind out the high gears. It take some time for riders to understand this.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Golden, Colorado
    Posts
    2,755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spook View Post
    It take some time for riders to understand this.

    WORD!!

    One bit of advice I'd like to pass along is to see if you can get a few sessions in on your own time when you can test drive various of your class profiles and see how it all feels and how you'd like to cue it. Sometimes stuff that seems tremendously important doesn't quite flow when you're in the Real World (as *real* a Real World as sitting on a bike that doesn't fall over can be )


    Vivienne

  7. Default

    Our Gym has had the M3's for about 2 years, and the riders were quite confused by all the info they were getting. How do I measure myself? Should I ride according to my heart rate, my power output, or how many "miles" I rode. (Those of you who were members of the old "Spinning Forum", should get a kick out of that one).

    After lots of reading on this and other forums, trial and error, and considering the various fitness levels of my riders, I came up with a 10 gear rule. I asked the riders to find the highest gear in which they could do a seated climb for 2 minutes, while maintaining 60-65 RPM. I told them that was gear 8. Gear 1 is your flat, and gears 9 & 10 are for standing climbs only. ( Although we sometimes use 8 for standing climbs too.)

    Seems to be working well, and about 6 weeks after starting the rule, we moved the the flat up 1 gear (and everything else also). Most had little or no problem, and those that did, just stayed with their original 10.

    "If it's too steep, you're too Old"

  8. Default

    I teach an intro class so I find it's important to give participants a solid understanding of all the numbers available on the Keisers. My view is that I'm preparing the participants to move on to other classes and other instructors who may just focus on power or RPM. So some days I focus on RPM and gearing. Other days, I'll focus on power output and try to explain a bit of the science. For newcomers to class, I ask them to start pedaling (nice and easy) at gear 1 (no resistance) and then I ask them to slowly move the gear lever up (or away) from them. They will start to feel some resistance under their legs. As soon as they feel resistance, I ask them to stop moving the lever and I refer to this as their base gear. I call this their easy flat road. I then cue relative to base gear. I ask them to ride at 85-90 RPM at base gear (no bouncing in the saddle). I don't give a number because it's relative to that person's abilities. Then I ask them to gear it up 1 or 2 gears while still maintaining 85-90 RPM. This becomes their hard flat road (on the real road, it would be a gear or two up on the bike but still on a flat road). If their pace drops, they've got too much resistance - I don't want them to climb just yet. For a hill climb, it's usually 3, 4 or 5 gears up from base (depending on how experienced the participants are). I love the Keisers and can't imagine going back to teaching with bikes without a computer monitor at all.

  9. Default

    "The incremental increase in resistance for each increment of 'gear' is not identical. This is due to the shape of the magnet (circular) and the way it moves over the flywheel. The more surface area of the magnet is over the wheel, the more the resistance. Very roughly, think of it this way: The gears 1-8 will have smaller increases in resistance for each number increase than the gears 9-16. For each number increase in gear, there is a greater increase in the magnet's surface area that overlaps the flywheel. Gears 17-24 will be smaller increase, more similar to the gears 1-8."

    So, is there a gear:watts ratio for a given rpm? Say every rider is on gear 10, riding at 80rpms, it would be reasonable to assume that everyone is riding with the same watt, no? About how many watts will increase if a gear is added to the 80rpms? About how many watts added to the same gear while increasing rpms to 90? Formula?

  10. Default

    We have seemingly newer Keiser's where resistance increases from about gear 10 (flat) and climbing resistance starts from gear 16. One instructor for a warm-up asks for gear 4 (basically freewheeling) and 140rpm -- a lot of bouncing and the power output is barely 60-65. What is the advantage of this compared to a warm-up at a higher resistance and a lower rpm, say gear 10 and 90-100rpm where the power output is much higher?

  11. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by David Lloyd View Post
    We have seemingly newer Keiser's where resistance increases from about gear 10 (flat) and climbing resistance starts from gear 16. One instructor for a warm-up asks for gear 4 (basically freewheeling) and 140rpm -- a lot of bouncing and the power output is barely 60-65. What is the advantage of this compared to a warm-up at a higher resistance and a lower rpm, say gear 10 and 90-100rpm where the power output is much higher?
    I would be very cautious about stating or using any gear as a specific effort. All riders will be different. I have some participants that would find gear 10 challenging and have difficulty maintaining a cadence of 70. Yet another participant will get on the same bike and hold 90rpm with very little effort.

    No one (except a track rider) should be at 140rpm. Even 120 would be to high for most participants. As you note, the bouncing is not good for the power (work effort) - and can't be fun for the body.

    My suggestion would be less focus on the numbers, particularly in the warm-up, and more focus on the feeling. Let people feel where their effort is for the different cadences. Your warm-up should prepare the participants for what your work is going to have in it. A little mini-class, so to speak, at lower efforts.
    Work and train smart, not hard. But be smart enough to know that sometimes it does take hard work to accomplish your goals.

    Follow me on Twitter

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •