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Thread: Light weights on bike

  1. #12
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    Thanks! I wasn't sure I liked it before, but now I enjoy the "rush" from room to room. It feels very purposeful and makes the workouts seem that way as well. It certainly staves off the potential for boredom or monotony, if that were ever a factor. Funny what you say about "buzz". I DO feel like it creates more of a buzz, if only for myself. I'm feeling pumped as I travel between exercises (even holding back huge smiles and a mini "woop!") and everyone else goes back and forth in complete silence.

  2. #13

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    My thought on this is that our participant's time in class is valuable, and time spent getting on or off the bike is wasted. I would do the weight work in one interval after getting off the bike. I took another instructor's cycle/strength class and it was done that way, and in the same room. There are benefits to doing intervals of cardio and strength work, but they work better with other cardio formats where there's no transitioning with the bike.

    I had also taken a couple combination cycle/yoga classes where we had to go to another room for the yoga and it seemed so disruptive. I was fortunate to be able to teach a cycle/yoga class for a few months in a place where there was room for everyone to set up their mats in front of their bikes. To me, any group ex class means you go into one room, do all your work there, then leave.

  3. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul S. View Post
    To me, any group ex class means you go into one room, do all your work there, then leave.
    WORD!! .....waiting on Tracy, mind.

    Or...if you have a better idea then act on it.

    For folk who perceive better value in a *combo* class, then I fancy that it should be made obvious that the transitions from one format to another actually take valuable training time away from the end goal.

    Given that group ex. is a format that appeals to folk who aren't really that GRRRRR! about training....and although I can't deny the entertainment value of folk who present more entertaining classes than I ...it still is what it is.

  4. #15

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    I appreciate the opinions of those who think getting off and on the bike is a waste of time, and I respectfully disagree. I'm sure there are instances where it is a waste of time, so I don't mean to offer my opinion as if my experience applies ubiquitously. However, how much time are we talking about here? If they are properly motivated, a student can transition from the bike to a pushup in less than 10 seconds. Even if they are moving at a snail's pace, how long a time do you think we're wasting here? 30 seconds? How is that a problem? It's still less time than most recoveries. Properly timed, a transition can *be* the recovery, as it often is when we are getting back onto the bike. I will concede that if for whatever reason the venue is changing or it takes your people 5 minutes to get on to the next thing, then yeah, you've got bigger problems and need to rethink your programming. My opinion and preference would be for those to be divided into two separate classes, but I digress.

    Perhaps, my use of the concept of "buzz" was misinterpreted as simply action for action's sake, i.e. let me just hit them with a million things so they'll think this is great and not be bored. Totally not me, nor my style. I'm about education and purpose in my classes, so if we are up and down off the bike it is because we are doing circuit training:

    http://www.drlenkravitz.com/Articles/circuits.html

    We move quickly because people like moving quickly. Just because people *like* to move quickly and do a lot of "stuff" does not automatically mean it is a waste of time. Quite the contrary. There is evidence that this style improves muscular strength, decreases body fat and provides a moderate improvement in aerobic capacity. So I'm going to keep doing it, students are going to keep enjoying it because "time goes by quickly" and "it is challenging." Give them what they need hidden inside what they want. No harm in that, especially if you can teach them something while you're doing it.

    I can understand why it isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I'll keep drinking it, tyvm!
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    Quote Originally Posted by groupfitpower View Post
    I appreciate the opinions of those who think getting off and on the bike is a waste of time, but I respectfully disagree. I'm sure there are instances where it is a waste of time, so I don't mean to offer my opinion as if my experience applies ubiquitously. However, how much time are we talking about here? If they are properly motivated, a student can transition from the bike to a pushup in less than 10 seconds. Even if they are moving at a snail's pace, how long a time do you think we're wasting here? 30 seconds? How is that a problem? It's still less time than most recoveries. Properly timed, a transition can *be* the recovery, as it often is when we are getting back onto the bike. I will concede that if for whatever reason the venue is changing or it takes your people 5 minutes to get on to the next thing, then yeah, you've got bigger problems and need to rethink your programming. My opinion and preference would be for those to be divided into two separate classes, but I digress.

    Perhaps, my use of the concept of "buzz" was misinterpreted as simply action for action's sake, i.e. let me just hit them with a million things so they'll think this is great and not be bored. Totally not me, nor my style. I'm about education and purpose in my classes, so if we are up and down off the bike it is because we are doing circuit training:

    http://www.drlenkravitz.com/Articles/circuits.html

    We move quickly because people like moving quickly. Just because people *like* to move quickly and do a lot of "stuff" does not automatically mean it is a waste of time. Quite the contrary. There is evidence that this style improves muscular strength, decreases body fat and provides a moderate improvement in aerobic capacity. So I'm going to keep doing it, students are going to keep enjoying it because "time goes by quickly" and "it is challenging." Give them what they need hidden inside what they want. No harm in that, especially if you can teach them something while you're doing it.

    I can understand why it isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I'll keep drinking it, tyvm!
    Spot on Krista, I teach a fusion class as well and it is well received by the members. Our numbers were dropping off and needed to change things up, of course the members heard the buzz of Soulcycle and they wanted us to start adding classes similar to their concept. We explained why those classes are not safe or productive but they wanted to "kill two birds with one stone" cardio and strength in one class. This is 8:30am so most of members are looking at improving fitness and not avid outdoor cyclists, I have a 75 minute group on Sunday who are my outdoor riders and this format would never work for them. The members really like the class it on Wednesdays, to they do regular cycle on Monday and Fridays, this mid-week 90 minute cycle/strength/running/core class is a nice way to change things up, is it a perfect situation no(we do have to move to another room but we do it under 5 minutes) but it adds some strength training,running,core work and they are having fun doing it.

  6. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by groupfitpower View Post
    I appreciate the opinions of those who think getting off and on the bike is a waste of time, and I respectfully disagree. I'm sure there are instances where it is a waste of time, so I don't mean to offer my opinion as if my experience applies ubiquitously. However, how much time are we talking about here? If they are properly motivated, a student can transition from the bike to a pushup in less than 10 seconds. Even if they are moving at a snail's pace, how long a time do you think we're wasting here? 30 seconds? How is that a problem? It's still less time than most recoveries. Properly timed, a transition can *be* the recovery, as it often is when we are getting back onto the bike. I will concede that if for whatever reason the venue is changing or it takes your people 5 minutes to get on to the next thing, then yeah, you've got bigger problems and need to rethink your programming. My opinion and preference would be for those to be divided into two separate classes, but I digress.
    Great point Krista - I've always viewed recovery as important, and yet in the scope of our relatively short classes, unproductive time. Why not use it more effectively if possible? Also this points to setting up your class physical environment in a way that minimizes the transition time.

  7. #18

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    I've been surfing around pedal-on looking at posts about weight-lifting on the bike during class. This has just started being offered at my gym, and as one of the few IDC instructors who actually rides a bike, it makes my eyes roll. What makes it worse is that I've already lost a rider to this class. I wish I could point to something that unequivocally demostrates that these types of actions (along with zumba movements, hovers, handle-bar pushups, etc) are dangerous or at least a waste of time. Does anyone have anything? I'm completely on-board that participants will get a much better workout if they simply added a 20 minute weights routine before or after the session, but for some reason folks think that because the cycle instructor is making this weight-lifting recommendation, it must be good.

  8. #19
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    New Jersey
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycle*punk View Post
    I've been surfing around pedal-on looking at posts about weight-lifting on the bike during class. This has just started being offered at my gym, and as one of the few IDC instructors who actually rides a bike, it makes my eyes roll. What makes it worse is that I've already lost a rider to this class. I wish I could point to something that unequivocally demostrates that these types of actions (along with zumba movements, hovers, handle-bar pushups, etc) are dangerous or at least a waste of time. Does anyone have anything? I'm completely on-board that participants will get a much better workout if they simply added a 20 minute weights routine before or after the session, but for some reason folks think that because the cycle instructor is making this weight-lifting recommendation, it must be good.
    All you really need to do is ask the following questions, "What is the purpose of lifting weights?" Generally the reply will be to either gain strength or muscle tone. And the next question you ask "Can you do that with light weights with enough repetitions to do that during the course of a cycling class, without it becoming a weight lifting class? Is the point of the class to cycle or distract members who might think they are bored?
    SpinBob
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    I'm guess you don't have bikes with power measurement capability... If you did, it would be easy... See how many watts you can generate in an all out sprint with solid resistance. Compare that to the max power you can generate while pedaling with a weight in your hand. It won't come anywhere near... More power (i.e. more Watts) = more calories. Since burning calories is what a lot of participants are after, this argument might hold some water.

    On the weight lifting side of the equation - go out on the gym floor, and pick the heaviest weight you can do 10-15 bicep curls with. Chances are you're not going to be able to curl nearly the same weight while sitting on a bike saddle.

    I've said it before and I'll say it again... Lifting weights ON the bike gets you the WORST of both worlds - not the best. Less power on the bike and limited to lighter weights = a less effective workout all around.
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  10. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycle*punk View Post
    ...What makes it worse is that I've already lost a rider to this class...
    Have you discussed this with this rider? If so, what was their response?

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