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Thread: Light weights on bike

  1. Default Light weights on bike

    Just wondering what the harm is of incorporating 3-5 minutes of an upper body work out with 2-5lb weights on the bike, at the end of a class?

  2. #2
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    You are teaching an exercise class and everything in your class should have a point. What is the point of weight lifting? It certainly won't build muscle mass, the weights used aren't heavy enough and it probably won't tone muscles, the time spent on it is not long enough. And why would you want to do it sitting on a bike?
    Last edited by SpinBob; 02-23-2013 at 07:05 PM.
    SpinBob
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  3. Default

    We wanted to incorporate some resistance training into our Spinning classes (to try and appeal to the masses at our facility that want to do group fitness, but don't want to "spend 45 minutes on a bike,") so our format is 30-40 minutes on the bike, and then we transition to the floor and do resistance training for 20-30 minutes using proper form and heavier weights, which is much more effective and reduces the risk of injury.
    Tracy
    Michigan
    STAR3 Certified Spinning Instructor

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    Quote Originally Posted by tvano1991 View Post
    We wanted to incorporate some resistance training into our Spinning classes (to try and appeal to the masses at our facility that want to do group fitness, but don't want to "spend 45 minutes on a bike,") so our format is 30-40 minutes on the bike, and then we transition to the floor and do resistance training for 20-30 minutes using proper form and heavier weights, which is much more effective and reduces the risk of injury.
    That is the best way to do it Tracy
    Last edited by SpinBob; 02-24-2013 at 03:35 PM.
    SpinBob
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  5. #5

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    Actually, the only way to incorporate weights is to do like "SpinBob" mentioned.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tvano1991 View Post
    We wanted to incorporate some resistance training into our Spinning classes (to try and appeal to the masses at our facility that want to do group fitness, but don't want to "spend 45 minutes on a bike,") so our format is 30-40 minutes on the bike, and then we transition to the floor and do resistance training for 20-30 minutes using proper form and heavier weights, which is much more effective and reduces the risk of injury.
    This approach makes sense, we should be doing natural movements on the bike and lifting weights does not fit. Obviously pushups, figure eights, isolations and one hand only on the handlebar do not belong in "Spin" class either. Madd Dod has a course "Contraindications to the spiinning program" that covers all of this. I would love to take it or get the information provided as I have been waiting for over a year to see it available within 100 miles of Chicago.

  7. #7

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    Honestly, if the weight is lighter than your purse, what is the point?
    sometimes low self-esteem is earned. it's the correct response if you are not trying your best. do something about it. - Michael Koppelman

    My Blog for Instructors (no longer updated, but some useful stuff) * Charleston RIDE™ * Spotify

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvano1991 View Post
    We wanted to incorporate some resistance training into our Spinning classes (to try and appeal to the masses at our facility that want to do group fitness, but don't want to "spend 45 minutes on a bike,") so our format is 30-40 minutes on the bike, and then we transition to the floor and do resistance training for 20-30 minutes using proper form and heavier weights, which is much more effective and reduces the risk of injury.
    This brings me to a question I've had lingering about. I've been attending a spin/strength class recently and I actually really like it. The class is formatted so that we start on the bike, transition to the room next door for some lifting, go back to the bike room, then end back in the other room for stability ball and core work. I wish there was more time on the bike, but then I suppose that defeats the purpose of the class. My question is this...is there a benefit to breaking it up in this way? Why not just do the first half on the bike and the second half in the other room? Any theories?

    Thanks!

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jruchti View Post
    This brings me to a question I've had lingering about. I've been attending a spin/strength class recently and I actually really like it. The class is formatted so that we start on the bike, transition to the room next door for some lifting, go back to the bike room, then end back in the other room for stability ball and core work. I wish there was more time on the bike, but then I suppose that defeats the purpose of the class. My question is this...is there a benefit to breaking it up in this way? Why not just do the first half on the bike and the second half in the other room? Any theories?

    Thanks!
    Here is a article from Spinning regarding fusion classes. I teach a 90 minute cycle/strength fusion class. Cycle portion is always 60 minutes. I will mix it up every week, sometimes 60 minutes cycle followed by strength work, sometimes followed by yoga/core work, sometimes a brick workout, cycle/run/cycle, sometimes 30 cycle/30 upper body/30 cycle. I find it successful and adds variety, if you do 60 minutes cycle followed by strength every week, I find half the group leaves, breaking it up keeps them engaged.
    http://www.spinning.com/media/spinni.../2011-8-1.html

  10. #10
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    Awesome, thanks!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by jruchti View Post
    This brings me to a question I've had lingering about. I've been attending a spin/strength class recently and I actually really like it. The class is formatted so that we start on the bike, transition to the room next door for some lifting, go back to the bike room, then end back in the other room for stability ball and core work. I wish there was more time on the bike, but then I suppose that defeats the purpose of the class. My question is this...is there a benefit to breaking it up in this way? Why not just do the first half on the bike and the second half in the other room? Any theories?

    Thanks!
    I can't speak for the instructor of the class you took, obviously, but in the fusion classes I design that include alternating off and on the bike I definitely have a reason for doing it that way. One of the reasons I call the "Curves" factor -- there are benefits to circuit training where periods of strength training are alternated with cardio work. Another reason is to create a little more "buzz" - you can get folks to respond with more energy if you increase the pace and the amount of activity, so some of my classes have lots of transitions. Sometimes the work on the bike is really intense and I want them to do it twice, so the floor work gives them time to recover if it comes in the middle. Every class is different, though, most days we do ride straight through and then finish on the floor, but if that isn't the plan, I try to explain my logic before class begins so they don't wonder.
    sometimes low self-esteem is earned. it's the correct response if you are not trying your best. do something about it. - Michael Koppelman

    My Blog for Instructors (no longer updated, but some useful stuff) * Charleston RIDE™ * Spotify

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