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Thread: Piriformis Syndrome Anyone?

  1. #1

    Default Piriformis Syndrome Anyone?

    I have recently diagnosed myself with Piriformis Syndrome. The pain is most noticeable when I am driving in the car and pain radiates from my glute down to my calf. Anybody experienced this? It is a real pain in the arse!
    "If we did all the things we were capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves" Thomas Edison

  2. #2

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    yes, it is .
    For me, it's stretching that does the trick. In the beginning I did it daily, now at least once a week and I'm fine.
    Do you stretch? If not, google can show you which routines can/should help. Good luck!

  3. #3

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    I have been stretching more, but seem to tighten up pretty quickly. I have been to my chiropractor, but the most relief from a massage. I feel good today, but I haven't exercised (unless you count cleaning the entire house). Thanks for the feedback!
    "If we did all the things we were capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves" Thomas Edison

  4. #4

    Default

    I feel your pain! I, too, self diagnosed piriformis syndrome a couple of years ago after going from just a little discomfort to a lot of discomfort over a period of about 3 months. The pain was in the glutes, then moved down to the hamstrings, continued to travel down to the feet and finally settled in as plantar fasciitis. If I knew then what I know now, I would have approached the problem differently because it took months to get to the root of the problem. . Here is what I learned - hopefully you will find some of it helpful. I started with some physical therapy and massage on the hamstrings and glutes, found a little relief but as soon as I returned to vigorous exercise, I was back to square one. On the advice of a PT friend, I contacted a certified ART provider (Active Release). Over a period of about 4 months, I found that the ART together with dry needle acupuncture relieved my symptoms significantly. With the help of an amazing provider, we managed to get to the root of the problem which was really the lower back. Continued maintenance of ART and dry needle has enabled me to manage it for the most part. I teach about 8 classes a week of varying formats including spin, strength and pilates as well as run marathons so there is a lot of "management" going on to be able to keep doing the things I love to do. My daily regime includes using a foam roller on my hamstrings and calves which really help release tightness between sessions. Most importantly, the piriformis may just be a symptom of something going on in the lower back or elsewhere. Don't let the problem persist because I gave up several months of training trying to heal after waiting too long to find the problem. Remember, as instructors, our bodies are our tools and we need to treat them with care! Good luck!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Golden, Colorado
    Posts
    2,752

    Default

    I sense a common theme, here.......self diagnosis and trial-and-error treatment.

    Maybe that's not the best approach.


    Vivienne

  6. #6

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    Lawoman: it's cleaning the house that's doing it. Pain in that area can be from lots of stuff. Good luck! I've had sciatica (along with functional scoliosis from leg length discrepancy) so I feel your pain. I hope you get an accurate diagnosis soon.

  7. #7

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    I have PS too, it flares up a few times a year. The best self-therapy I've found is using a firm (black) foam roller. Focused massage stretches twice weekly for preventative maintenance and 4-5 times/week during flare ups. One of the best techniques, that's harder to describe in words vs demonstrate, is to place the foam roller horizontal on the wall, place your feet 20"+/- away from the wall so you can push pressure into the foam roller, and do small sections of 4-6" at a time, rolling both up and down and rolling side to side across the top of the foam roller: your lowest back just above your glute with your back at 11:00/1:00 angles so it gets more to the side, 10:00/2:00 angles so it really gets more to the outside. Seated foam roller on the glutes one at a time, forward and back, and angling your knees higher and lower at the same time to widen the area of the glute you are massaging. Hamstrings one at a time to be able to bear down with more weight, and also angling the leg 45 degrees to the outside to get the outer ham muscles. Finishing with the IT band massage. I've been teaching foam roller strength and flexibility conditioning classes for several years so it has been easy to apply self-therapy this way. If you haven't done foam roller, please engage a personal trainer or physical therapist to show you how. I've shared these suggestions to other cyclists and runners with PS and all have had great success with these stretch massages.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nshort View Post
    I have PS too, it flares up a few times a year. The best self-therapy I've found is using a firm (black) foam roller. Focused massage stretches twice weekly for preventative maintenance and 4-5 times/week during flare ups. One of the best techniques, that's harder to describe in words vs demonstrate, is to place the foam roller horizontal on the wall, place your feet 20"+/- away from the wall so you can push pressure into the foam roller, and do small sections of 4-6" at a time, rolling both up and down and rolling side to side across the top of the foam roller: your lowest back just above your glute with your back at 11:00/1:00 angles so it gets more to the side, 10:00/2:00 angles so it really gets more to the outside. Seated foam roller on the glutes one at a time, forward and back, and angling your knees higher and lower at the same time to widen the area of the glute you are massaging. Hamstrings one at a time to be able to bear down with more weight, and also angling the leg 45 degrees to the outside to get the outer ham muscles. Finishing with the IT band massage. I've been teaching foam roller strength and flexibility conditioning classes for several years so it has been easy to apply self-therapy this way. If you haven't done foam roller, please engage a personal trainer or physical therapist to show you how. I've shared these suggestions to other cyclists and runners with PS and all have had great success with these stretch massages.
    I do have a foam roller and I am going to try to use it as you have described. I hadn't thought about using it on the wall. Thank you for the tips.
    "If we did all the things we were capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves" Thomas Edison

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    12

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    thank you for sharing. I also suffer from this piriformis syndrome. Originally the chiropractor dx it as sciatica but then it traveled down, more over my gluteous maximus. My doctor finally did hip and back xrays and boy my back shows scoliosis and lt hip is gone. I will need surgery :-(. For the PS I foam roll as often as I can, have gone 4 days without cycling and stopped any weight conditioning I had been doing. It keeps me up most nights. very discouraged, as this is been going on now for a year.... maybe some massage will help!

  10. Default

    Been there, done that. Went to a sports physical therapist. Gave me stretching exercises. Placed a mini band around ankles did monster walks forward, back, side to side. Also place a stability ball behind lower back against wall and did squats then side to side lateral movements. Used tennis ball to massage butt on floor or against wall. Had it for years but now pain free. Once I feel it coming on I stretch a lot.

  11. Default

    Youtube nerve flossing for piriformis

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