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Thread: NON-Certified Instructors?!?

  1. #23
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    Mar 2004
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    Southwestern Sheboygan, Wisconsin USA
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    A couple of random slices:

    Spending 30 years of my young life working for a YMCA I am well aware there are a lot of instructors out there teaching w/o a certification in the discipline they teach. And since my wife has been in the education field her entire working life I realize that certification; training and tenure does not guarantee a good teacher. In my opinion because a lot of clubs are financially strapped they are willing to take a chance on the non-certified folks. And a lot of the certifying programs do not have the time or man power to police the people representing themselves as instructors in their program after they leave the building after certification.

    I feel strongly the certification process works if done correctly and in it's entirety. The Spinning Instructor Training is intended to be six months of learning and instructor development - not spend eight hours on a weekend and when you get home complete the test and send it in. Orientation creates a duty for regular CE. And again I realize you cannot teach personality and creativity.

    Another problem is participants do not check the credentials of their instructors and or the quality of the programs their gyms are rolling out. If you advertise the Spinning Program you are implying your instructors are Spinning certified and your participants have the right to assume that unless told otherwise. If your facility does not advertise a trademarked program I guess your participants will accept and eat from what ever dish is brought to the potluck dinner.

    Finally looking at this from a risk management position if something happens in your program and you as an instructor are deposed or called to testify - when asked why you did what you did - how do you think it's going to go over and/or how are you going to feel when you have to admit you have no formal training in the program you teach. At least if you have a certification you can provide a basis for why you do what you do.

    I will never mentor (or share music or profiles) with a colleague who is not certified.

    Cheeze
    "Success is a inside job"

  2. #24

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    I am a longtime cycling student and recently read Jennifer Sage's book "Keeping it Real". Without knowing that I was actually working correctly on my bike (I wear a Heart Rate Monitor and read everything I can on indoor cycling, intervals and nutrition), the information I found in her book made me feel pretty special! I am now working actively to bring this knowledge to my gym (LA Fitness in Hemet, California) and have asked that the Regional Manager to find instructors for our program that will "Keep it Real!" She is working on the issue, but says that staffing our gym is difficult and has also met with resistance from instructors that have been teaching "aerobics on a bike" for years. How can I help our Regional Manager replace these instructors before someone gets hurt?

  3. #25
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    Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrjimenez View Post
    I am a longtime cycling student and recently read Jennifer Sage's book "Keeping it Real". Without knowing that I was actually working correctly on my bike (I wear a Heart Rate Monitor and read everything I can on indoor cycling, intervals and nutrition), the information I found in her book made me feel pretty special! I am now working actively to bring this knowledge to my gym (LA Fitness in Hemet, California) and have asked that the Regional Manager to find instructors for our program that will "Keep it Real!" She is working on the issue, but says that staffing our gym is difficult and has also met with resistance from instructors that have been teaching "aerobics on a bike" for years. How can I help our Regional Manager replace these instructors before someone gets hurt?
    jrjimenez I'm trying to understand your concern here. Have people been hurt in the past?

  4. #26
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    Jun 2009
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    Oakmont, PA near Pittsburgh
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    Hey Jr (guessing that might be a name),

    Having had my own studio for the last 5 years, and starting out with a very similar perspective as you have espoused here, I can tell you that it is highly unlikely that LA Fitness or any other studio for that matter can exist with a "Keep It Real" only style of instruction. This is what I tried, and lost quite a bit of money doing it. The fact of the matter is that there are way more people interested in just a good workout, high heart rates and sweating buckets than those looking to train to ride their bikes more effectively. In other words, the business model can not support a "replacement" of instructors even if there was the will and ability to do so.

    I would like to offer you a suggestion however, that I have found actually can work and does work in many places now. Perhaps you might get more traction by asking your Regional Manager to begin including instructors who also ride outside, and more specifically have been certified in cycling specific methods of instruction. In this way, they can designate these classes in a way that outdoor cyclists can be attracted to. If the classes are clearly denoted as "cycling specific" it could become a whole new initiative, and perhaps some outdoor riders would even bring a group of their riding buddies in to help fill those classes. The outdoor riding community has shunned indoor cycling for many years and for many varied reasons. However, one of the biggest reasons that goes unsaid is that they have not really experienced a well designed, well executed, cycling specific class. If we can get them in the doors and have them take one of these types of classes, the club should see a net GAIN in attendance or membership. It then becomes a win-win for everyone.
    Gene (Gino) Nacey
    Master Heart Zones Instructor
    Spinning Instructor
    USA Cycling Coach
    Owner, Global Ride Training Center &
    Global Ride Productions (virtual cycling DVDs)
    Founder, Cycling Fusion

    Always finish strong!

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  5. Default

    But I don't think keeping it "real" necessarily equates to strictly "cycling specific" or "training oriented" classes. It can, but it doesn't have to. To me the concept simply means not doing stuff on a bike that doesn't make sense to do on a bike... There's plenty you can do to provide a "high heart rate, sweating buckets" kind of class and still keep the class "real" from the perspective of pedaling the bike within safe and appropriate ranges of cadence/resistance, etc.

    We do just what you described in our studio - some more cycling specific/training oriented classes (that our outdoor riders LOVE), but MOST are more "traditional" good ol' sweaty workout kind of classes.
    Inner Drive Cycling|Fitness Studio
    Indoor Cycling|Functional Fitness|Multisport Coaching & Club
    www.innerdrivestudio.com

  6. #28
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    Oct 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by liveon2wheels View Post
    Hey Jr (guessing that might be a name),

    Now then, Gino .....let's not imply that there might be folk who'd use this forum for spammish activities .....not sayin' you are, mind

    Thing is, WRT so-called *REAL* training is that it is what it is .....and it ain't what it ain't. I know better than to imply that my fellow instructors who do a bit more of the aerobics on a bike stuff are providing a worse service to the paying customer than I ( Efharisto!!) However, as one of my mentors always said .....*It's dark in there*. The meaning being that, providing an intelligent challenge to the body's physiology doesn't have to come from a designated *REAL* thingie. It is what it is.

    By all means if *Keeping It Real* means avoiding repetitive stress injuries or the nitwittery that gives a low return on exercise investment time .... I'm all for it.

    I look forward to your future contributions to this forum on multiple topics beyond Keeping It Real jrjimminy (?)

    Vivienne

  7. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
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    Vivienne you've got a great nose for these possible spam comments. I did some digging and while I can't say for certain, it appears that jrjimenez might be an attorney in California.

    Indulge my daydream fantasy here...

    Pretend you're a group fitness department head with LA Fitness, the largest big-box health club chain in America.

    A "concerned member" alerts you to instructors who are potentially going to hurt someone, not that they have, but solely based on a book she read that made her feel "pretty special!".

    The "concerned member" recommends that you; "replace these instructors before someone gets hurt"

    But for whatever reason you don't replace anyone...


    Then the
    "concerned member" publicly posts how they communicated their concerns to you, here at the most popular indoor cycling forum on the Internet. It's their only post and they don't respond to follow up comments

    I'll leave it up to you to decide what could happen next.

  8. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Golden, Colorado
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    Quote Originally Posted by admin View Post
    Vivienne you've got a great nose for these possible spam comments.
    Busted!!

    Reality is that I don't. However, it's not a bad idea to hone ones critical thinking skills on random posts...

    *Longtime Cycling Student* ... and "recently read" an abso-TOOT-ly AbFab book by Jennifer Sage. Anyone who's ever clapped eyes on this would attest that it deserves a place on anyone's library shelf. Except....it's a e-book. You don't just stumble over it at the library when you're looking for, say, anything with a K in its title. You have to purchase, download and print it.

    FWIW, I doubt that anyone who's purchased, downloaded and read Keeping It Real would argue that it's not worth even more than the dollar amount to do all of that but still, it takes effort to have it in your reading armamentarium.

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