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Thread: Lemond resistance problems

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona (yep, it is HOT here)
    Posts
    983

    Default Lemond resistance problems

    Hey all!
    As in previous posts, at one club we have 12 or so old yellow Lemond REvmaster bikes that are in dire need of service. My club seems to think that the maintenance guy can do all that they need, but as you can guess, not quite the case.
    The biggest issue is with resistance. When you add resistance, you either don't feel it, then BAM it loads 20 sec to 2 min later, or you can be riding with perfect resistance and it comes and goes without warning. It is very inconsistent and frusterating, let alone having injury potential. Once while riding with moderate resistance, it loaded so heavy on me that I almost had to stop pedaling and tweaked my knee, so I was a bit upset. I have sent numerous requests to get this issue fixed, but it never gets better. Having read a bit about these bikes, this is a brake pad problem ???(am I wrong) and it is as simple as replacing the existing pad.
    If there is anyone out there that has knowledge regarding this please let me know. If I have a specific solution to this problem, I could maybe make some steps to convince the management to spring for some new parts. grrrr!
    Thanks so much!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kapowsin, Washington
    Posts
    111

    Default

    We have 30 RevMasters at the Y I lead rides at. I have noticed the same problem with the resistance changing without touching the resistance knob - sometime the change is very dramatic as you described.

    Our solution:
    First remove all of the resistance. Then spray a rag with WD40. Hold the rag on the side of the flywheel (not the thin edge that the brake pad rides on) then turn the pedals slowly. Moving the rag over the side surface of the flywheel. This step is simply cleaning and putting a light coating of WD40 on both sides of the flywheel.
    Then while continuing to slowly turn the pedals add 2 or 3 drops of 3 In One Oil to the thin edge of the flywheel (the edge the brake pad rides on). This will lubricate the edge and the brake pad. You don't want too much oil. Just a couple of drops is enough. It may take a drop or two more if it has not been done for a long time.
    We follow this procedure about once a month and it has greatly reduced the problem.

    Hope it helps.
    Willie
    Spinning Star 3
    Heart Zones Level 2
    YMCA Group Cycling Instructor Trainer

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona (yep, it is HOT here)
    Posts
    983

    Default

    thanks for your reply Willie!
    I tried this today as a last attempt to make the bikes work. It seemed to make the tension changes a bit smoother, but still encountered massive changes of tension with no turning the resistance knob...grrrrrr!
    The maintenance guy asked me what exactly was wrong with the bikes (even though I have written it down several times). I told him specifically the resistance problem and he said that he would try to get to it (not sure what he is gonna do) but that 'he is busy'. ugh! That and the AC didn't work today in the Studio where the spin bikes are located (remember, I am in AZ and it was supposted to be 103 today.
    Getting REALLY frusterated with that place!

  4. Default

    We have a ton of issues with our Lemond bikes, I find that the tension is really hard to create and you really have to crank them in order to begin feeling the tension that you should be at with as many cranks as one has to do to them. But, then, once it is turned alllll the way, then the resistance is strong. Perhaps they need better serviced?

    Are there other indoor cycling brands that you all are more familiar with and whose resistance is not quite as flaky?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona (yep, it is HOT here)
    Posts
    983

    Default

    I ride the Keiser M3's at another club...and LOVE them for the feel of resistance...very smooth and consistent. They use a magnet to create resistance, while Lemonds uses an brake pad that comes in contact with the flywheel. IMO...the magnet works better. Only ridden the Spinners a couple times and wasn't a huge fan.

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for posting this thread - the gym a I teach at / manage has Lemond Revmaster Bikes and this same problem has been observed with a few of our bikes. And they are constantly in need of new bearings too! Class after class, I will have a student report to me that their bike was "clicking" and it turns out it is time to order new bearings. I have to order bearings for these bikes more than I have to order almost anything else for the gym! So frustrating.

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