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View Full Version : Keiser M3 distance?



Moot
06-28-2010, 09:25 PM
I have a member in my Monday class last week and today asked me if distance displayed on the screen of the Keiser M3s (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007ALIX4W/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B007ALIX4W&linkCode=as2&tag=indocyclinstp-20) was in miles or KM.

I guess it is miles but I am in a bit of a French area of Montreal and some people like to convert the distance to Km.

Does the M3 offer the flexibility for the person to set up the distance to work in miles or Km? Or is it always only in miles?

I was supposed to ask the maintenance staff tonight but forgot and will propably see the member tomorrow morning again.

thanks

Funhog
06-28-2010, 09:40 PM
I bet there is an option when you set up the meter. And I would be surprised if whoever set your meters up put it in miles. But who knows? I am also surprised there's not a little indicator (mi or km) on the meter.

I'm sure there is a Keiser toll-free number you can call for info.

Todd S
06-28-2010, 09:41 PM
I think you could best assume that the distance is in 'make believe'. :)

Funhog
06-28-2010, 09:47 PM
I think you could best assume that the distance is in 'make believe'. :)

Well, I was going to say that! I left it up to you! :rolleyes:

CycleGuy
06-29-2010, 12:39 AM
Todd's response is the closest to the truth.

There is a formula, based on the diameter of the wheel, that converts revolutions to a distance. It is not metric from what I recall.

So basically, spin the flywheel x number of times, go z distance. Doesn't matter the resistance used.

Yeah, so basically useless as any type of a measure of effort. Much like all the other bike computers. They all seem to have this 'need' to display a distance. No matter that it makes no sense.

Moot
06-29-2010, 04:36 AM
Thanks for the info.

I will check with the maintenance guys at the gym and will try giving Keiser a call as well.

I will also tell the member that distance displayed is not that accurate.

Moot

Robert
06-29-2010, 06:11 AM
It's not distance, just the number of times the wheel turns.

I think (can't remember) that 0.1 equates to 100 revolutions of the flywheel, so that 1.0 is 1000 revs (not metres).

Funhog
06-29-2010, 12:24 PM
who rides the new Schwinn Power bikes (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003TQ2O1U/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B003TQ2O1U&linkCode=as2&tag=indocyclinstp-20)? Apparently they use their "distance" even more than the "power". (Heard that from someone who took a Schwinn class taught by a top Schwinn MI at a conference a few weeks ago).

Anyone know anything about this? I think their "distance" is a function of wattage output, and not circumference of the flywheel. I'd be curious as to how it's determined.

Apparently higher power output translates to more distance....which as anyone knows, once you throw a hill or headwind into the equation, it's all screwed up.

Lisa
06-29-2010, 09:05 PM
We use the new Schwin bikes at our gym. The power console displays mph, watts, ht. rate, kcals, rpms, and total ride time with distance.
Every instructor uses the computer differently. I mostly teach to rpm and wattage. I can ask the MI about the distance and how it relates to rpms but I'd imagine the faster you spin the more distance travelled regardless of resistance level.
Believe it or not, some members are focused on the Kcals burned in the hour class.

yumipon
10-06-2010, 05:47 PM
Distance shown on M3 bike is for maintenance purpose only, and their manual states that clearly for obvious reasons. But, I also had several people talking to each other how far they went after the class when that distance meant useless like we all know.:)

Megale
10-06-2010, 06:35 PM
who rides the new Schwinn Power bikes? Apparently they use their "distance" even more than the "power". (Heard that from someone who took a Schwinn class taught by a top Schwinn MI at a conference a few weeks ago).
Incorrect- All measurements can be used to analyze, goal set and challenge individuals weather during the class or from class to class month to month year to year.



Anyone know anything about this? I think their "distance" is a function of wattage output, and not circumference of the flywheel. I'd be curious as to how it's determined. The bike goes no where. Its a predicted measurement. It is a way to have feedback for output based on an algorithm.


Apparently higher power output translates to more distance....which as anyone knows, once you throw a hill or headwind into the equation, it's all screwed up. Again you are going no where its a stationary bike. The real can be put into a ride with realistic cadences. Even positioning yourself on a stationary bike is messed up compared to cycling. Even on rollers with a real bike.
My feeling is its still what you do to keep yourself trained up for the purpose of overloading for a given test.

Best Regards
Mike

Todd S
10-07-2010, 12:23 AM
The bike goes no where. Its a predicted measurement. It is a way to have feedback for output based on an algorithm.

Knowing the algorithm would help us evaluate its worth.

Megale
10-07-2010, 12:59 AM
Compared to what? A real bike? ;) Seriously a lot of the engineering in software and firmware is intellectual property. Doubt that we would be given that. I think a preprogrammed simulator is probably the only way to get a "hill" or head wind reading and then constraints and finite elements would need to be factored in creating a need for forensics and evaluation after to determine just what was true of the simulation. It is almost aerospace at that point. Does overload training as we know it need to go that far geek?
Megale

Todd S
10-07-2010, 01:04 AM
I don't understand why it should be a secret.

Megale
10-07-2010, 01:11 AM
I don't understand why it should be a secret.

It's their property I guess they feel a need to secure that like most untangable things kind of like Cokes recipe or satilite frequency codes.

Todd S
10-07-2010, 01:15 AM
Understandable if they stumbled on to the formula for the true meaning of life, but it's the distance calculation on a bike that goes nowhere for god's sake...

Megale
10-07-2010, 01:23 AM
Understandable if they stumbled on to the formula for the true meaning of life, but it's the distance calculation on a bike that goes nowhere for god's sake...

LOL Devine principles and cycling! The bridge has been found! Alas a new theory to crusade for a session at WSSC.
I will ask for a better answer to both questions. 1) what drives the quotient and 2) why do we not let on this info?
Me

Todd S
10-07-2010, 09:23 AM
I will ask for a better answer to both questions. 1) what drives the quotient and 2) why do we not let on this info?


You may find that they're too embarrassed to share it.

Megale
10-07-2010, 10:14 AM
You may find that they're too embarrassed to share it.
Do you have a "reasonable guess" as to what it may be?
Me

Todd S
10-07-2010, 10:53 AM
No but I'll bet there's no calculus involved.

Megale
10-07-2010, 11:20 AM
No but I'll bet there's no calculus involved.
I bet it has something to do with an apple of medium size and how fast it can be lifted one meter into the air.
M

Rikster
02-11-2017, 04:13 PM
Hi; if the flywheel diameter is 15.5 inches that makes the circumference 48.71 inches. I get 9 full rotations of the flywheel each time one of my feet goes through one revolution. It takes me 20 pedal revolutions to make .1 Keiser. So I figure 1 keiser covers 87,678 inches, or 1.384 miles. So if the flywheel was sitting on the ground I would travel 1.384 miles for each keiser. Now on a normal bike you wouldn't get 9 full rotations of your rear wheel for each pedal revolution like you do on a keiser....

Vivienne
02-13-2017, 04:50 PM
....errr.

Are you a nerdy physics grad student who has never ...ever...ridden a bike.

I blame your parents..

Vivienne
02-13-2017, 04:52 PM
....or are you being a dick (stranger things have happened)