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owl_girl
03-29-2010, 01:48 PM
I have a lady in one of my classes that have been dealing with SI joint pain for quite awhile. She is very active. She has given up everything but cycling and is afraid that she may have to give up cycling as well.

Is there anything that I can suggest to her to make Spinning class more comfortable for her? She will be visiting her doctor later this week for another evaluation.

SpinBob
03-29-2010, 02:08 PM
Comfort is very subjective. A padded seat cover may help and raising the handlebars may also take undue pressure off the lower back. Suggest to your student that she be very aware of the level of resistance she uses during seated climbs and suggest that she can continue climbs out of the saddle, even if the rest of the class isn't doing that.

With that being said, if the joint pain is due to an injury, the best thing you can do is recommend to your student that she stops any activity that aggravates the injury until it has had time to heal. If the joint pain is due to arthritis, it is going to hurt and there is very little you can do to prevent this.

Funhog
03-29-2010, 02:58 PM
A lot of SI joint pain is due to long term imbalances (sometimes over many years) and anatomical anomalies. Having been the recipient of said pain (due to leg length discrepancy, scoliosis, fused spine...and too much skiing hard) the only things that ever worked for me was a really good physical therapist who helped me analyze movement patterns that were contributing to it, and then making adjustments. When it was acute (years ago) I took some pain killers, but try to avoid those as much as possible. Some massage techniques also worked; and I used a soft small ball (a tennis ball is too hard) to roll on. At some point, thankfully, it just disappeared (occasionally reoccurs either from excessive exercise or excessive inactivity, but never as bad as it was).

I still do most of the things I love - except run and hike. I don't think she should have to stop everything if she can find the source of this pain and not just put a bandaid on it. That may take a long time and very good therapists/doctors. (IMO, some PTs are better at working with this kind of problem and finding non-surgical solutions than some doctors are. That said after 30+ years of back issues).

Regarding cycling, if you think about it, there's quite a bit of action at that joint as you pedal (even though it's a joint with very little, almost imperceptible, movement). So double check to make sure her set-up is correct - so important for avoiding this kind of discomfort, and that her pedaling mechanics are smooth and that she always pedals with some resistance. Bouncing in the saddle due to too low resistance would contribute to the pain.

kelwend
03-29-2010, 07:30 PM
Everything out of the saddle would have produce more stress on SI joint.

When you analyse the all body motion, you impose a kind of torsion in the pelvis if you have anykind of imbalence, tension or flexibility problem (too much or not enought) those torsion would impose A LOT OF stress.

So to reply to the question, as an indoor cycling instructor propose more saddle time; as a personal trainer watch if the flexibility and strenght of ALL muscles attached to the pelvis is good; as a physicla therapist we would watch more deaply but that is not our job so I would not talk about it.

I hope you could find something that could help you.

elsaltamontes
03-30-2010, 02:00 PM
I get SI pain occasionally and my clients have it now and again. Using a ball works well to break the pain cycle as funhog suggests.

Personally I use a tennis ball on top of a yoga block and then carefully lay on it and roll slightly or just stay still. This is a tenuous position so be careful. You could make it safer and less pressure if you just lean up against a wall and press the spot just above the SI into the tennis ball on the yoga block.

Anther trick I learned from a Physical therapist is to place your foot on a step, stay tall, neutral spine, and press your foot into the step without actually steping up or lifting off the ground, and hold it for 10sec. and repeat a few times. This is supposed to "reset" the SI joint if it is out of place.

As far as riding, yes handlebars high and close to you as possible to minimize forward bending especially near that area. Avoid heavy resistance and hard, high powered efforts for sure.

I might actually reccomend standing for very short periods of time for the fact that the slightly forward position will decrease forward bending of the spine and take a little pressure off that area.

But you have now added some instability to the pelvis which could also aggrevate the problem. I think this is a perfect case to "lightly" brace the core to help stabilize while you stand. You shouldn't stand long so breathing should not be a big issue especailly at sub maximal effort. I woud say the standing position will be trial and error either way. hope this helps!

Funhog
03-30-2010, 03:46 PM
Anther trick I learned from a Physical therapist is to place your foot on a step, stay tall, neutral spine, and press your foot into the step without actually steping up or lifting off the ground, and hold it for 10sec. and repeat a few times. This is supposed to "reset" the SI joint if it is out of place.



Thanks Doug! I'm going to try this next time I feel that pain. I call it the "toothache" in the butt pain.

kelwend
03-30-2010, 09:25 PM
Not specificly for SI but really good for the back:
Lye on a roller, close to a wall, and put your legs on the wall 90degres hip angle is the best.
Stay there for 20minutes, after that all the tension in your back would release and you will have a really great back aweareness.