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G66
02-27-2009, 06:43 PM
We just replaced 18 Schwinns with 30 Keiser M3s. I love them and have had my students focus on watts using a thread I read here with the "magic numbers" for 3 different fitness levels and body types...anyway. I have been teaching to sprint between 110-120 rpms. I just found out that Keiser recommends NOT to go above 110. I have been certified through MD, Reebok ,Ycycle and I thought it was always safe to sprint at 120 What are your thoughts? I've also been teaching that a flat road is between a 6-10? Am I completely off base here? Thanks in advance:confused:

kszspin
02-27-2009, 06:56 PM
I only know MDA (Spinning) guidelines, so I can tell you that cadence ranges for a flat road are 80-110rpm, hills 60-80rpm.
Not sure what you mean by "flat road between a 6-10?"
For many participants, riding at 110 rpm is a challenge with "honest" resistance. Watch that they are riding the bike at that speed, not vice versa.

And remember, sprinting is major effort (big gear, < 30 sec) :)

Robert
02-27-2009, 08:02 PM
110rpm is the guidelines for pretty much every certification.

HOWEVER, if you see a cyclist holding proper form, with resistance, and still pushing 140rpm, let him be. He may just be your nation's next great track cycling medal-winner! :D

Seriously, though, I can top 150rpm without bouncing... although my HR can hit the roof pretty quickly

JoyofSpin
03-10-2009, 05:09 PM
Just rode with Josh at ECA and he mentioned this and Robert is spot on. If your rider can maintain over 110 RPM with proper form and control - let it go.

Cyclerama
03-27-2009, 11:11 AM
I generally keep resistance between 7-9 for sprints, 30 sec. tops. I reach 130-140 rpm myself so agree with the other comments about letting students that can hold a higher cadence with good form go for it.

My students have found that the resistance can really vary by bike (why is this?)- many try to reserve the same bike each day which is interesting.

RaffCycles
03-27-2009, 11:51 AM
I only know MDA (Spinning) guidelines, so I can tell you that cadence ranges for a flat road are 80-110rpm, hills 60-80rpm.
Not sure what you mean by "flat road between a 6-10?"
For many participants, riding at 110 rpm is a challenge with "honest" resistance. Watch that they are riding the bike at that speed, not vice versa.

And remember, sprinting is major effort (big gear, < 30 sec) :)

Sprinting should max out at 110 in the Spinning program with significant resistance. I tell my students that there will be a significant increase in resistance without a significant increase in cadence during the sprint.

That being said, if I have a person that can sprint (with realistic resistance) above 110, maintain good form, and acheive the level of exertion expected of a sprint, then I do not have a problem with them going over 110. If their form is shoddy and their legs are a blur, then we'll have a private conversation during the recovery between sprints and I'll explain the concept to that rider.

I'm with Kelly on the confusion of what a 6-10 means. Are you talking the modified Borg RPE scale?

kspin
03-28-2009, 08:48 AM
I think since this insructor is using Keisers, I believe the 6-10 on a flat refers to the gear range he/she tells them.

I agree with the 110 max unless the circumstances already described apply.

Robert
03-28-2009, 06:57 PM
I hope instructors aren't falling into the trap of prescribing gears...

...I warm up on gear 13, as an instructor (i.e., lower than I could handle for a flat road as I keep my effort controlled)

On the other hand, there are some that find gear 10 to be a hard climb.

EmAnJ
04-06-2009, 01:07 PM
We use Kaisers too. If people ask me what gear to do a flat road in, I usually go with 6 to 12, however, I never state gears unless asked (some are competitive and like to try to keep up with me). I use RPE 1 to 10 or percentage max.

I've noticed the bikes differ in resistance as well. Talked to the gym manager and she said they need to be calibrated a couple of times a year (and that they'll calibrate them since there are problems) because they DO get wear and tear like any other bike, which affects the magnets.