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joycenahorski
05-22-2008, 10:39 AM
Just looking for some suggestions on how to learn these tracks. I am looking for any advice you guys may have. I am having a hard time learning it. I can do it fine with notes in front of me but once you take those notes away, I freeze. HELP!!

Joyce

:o

thosknox
05-22-2008, 02:21 PM
Joyce,

I wrote a wonderful reply that got sucked into cyberspace.

Bottom line, you must know your chorie by heart and without your notes. If you don't, you are not ready or prepared to teach.

thosknox

NJSpiner
05-22-2008, 02:34 PM
Joyce.. I take Bodypump often. Many of the instructors often have a scrap of paper with notes on them at hand to refresh thier memory when they forget something in the middle of a track. RPM is no different. Not a big deal and no need to have it internalized all the time. You're HUMAN... your riders will understand that 100%. RELAX and go with the flow!

Blackdog
05-22-2008, 02:50 PM
Go right ahead and use notes (just not pages of info though).
If you create different ride profiles for every class - there is no way you will ever accomplish teaching a Spin class by heart all the time. Teaching by heart without notes will only work if you are doing the same ride over and over and over....
I create completely different music selections and profiles for every class. With notes, you can easily goback and review and do the same profile again months down the road.

Opps...I just realized this post was in the RPM category. Please disregard my comments.

rick316
05-22-2008, 03:45 PM
Bottom line, you must know your chorie by heart and without your notes. If you don't, you are not ready or prepared to teach.

thosknox

I don't know my playlists by heart,or the profiles either! That's why I always have my laptop right next to me with lots of pretty colors on the document to keep me awake while I lead my class in a highly motivating manner:p

Robert
05-22-2008, 05:34 PM
there is no way you will ever accomplish teaching a Spin class by heart all the time.

Normally, Patrick would chip in to say this but...

...this sounds like a strictly RPM thing, so should not be called Spin/Spinning.

Going back into my pedantry box now :cool:

triang34
05-22-2008, 09:44 PM
Normally, Patrick would chip in to say this but...

...this sounds like a strictly RPM thing, so should not be called Spin/Spinning.

Going back into my pedantry box now :cool:

Well, since Patrick isn't chiming in, I will.

One should be able to place a cd in the stereo (or plug in their iPod), without any hand written notes.... and just RIDE to the music. Ride your emotions. Feel how your body reacts to what it hears. Become aware.

We don't have notes to guide us through our every day lives... so every once in a while, just feel. Experience. Explore.

Guaranteed ... you and your riders will walk away with smiles on their faces.

alexkaboom
05-23-2008, 07:04 AM
Well, since Patrick isn't chiming in, I will.

One should be able to place a cd in the stereo (or plug in their iPod), without any hand written notes.... and just RIDE to the music. Ride your emotions. Feel how your body reacts to what it hears. Become aware.

We don't have notes to guide us through our every day lives... so every once in a while, just feel. Experience. Explore.

Guaranteed ... you and your riders will walk away with smiles on their faces.

Very True. Go ahead... it's ok to break free.

Angie:
When I grow up I wanna be like you! :D

Alex

triang34
05-23-2008, 07:59 AM
Our riders pedaled to their emotions today. I gave them one word or emotion at the beginning of each song, and I asked that they reflect upon how that word conjured up different emotions and thoughts. I asked them to then show me (using the various riding positions within the program), what they felt.

Some eyes were closed, other riders found themselves smiling, some cried.

It was incredible to witness.

BTW ~ Thanks, Alex. Big hug!

groupfitpower
05-23-2008, 09:47 AM
... she is talking about teaching an RPM class, not a Spinning class, so she is REQUIRED to follow their notes, their choreo, their playlists. She doesn't have the luxury of going with the flow, even though it is great advice for new Spinning instructors.

It sounds to me like you need more prep time. Ride the ride everyday until it is "in" you. Make a cheat sheet and use it less and less every time you practice. You have to set the time aside to rehearse and you have to patient with yourself and your learning style. If it takes you too long to memorize the ride or you don't have the time to invest in learning it, you might consider switching to a gym that offers a different cycling class. Then, you can make your own profiles and "go with the flow" and if you ever forget your cue -- no one will be the wiser!

Good luck!
Krista

triang34
05-23-2008, 09:50 AM
[quote]... she is talking about teaching an RPM class, not a Spinning class/[quote]

My bad. I missed that part.

thosknox
05-23-2008, 01:24 PM
Krista is exactly right. Use the learning style that works best for you; auditory, visual, or physical, and/or a combination of all three, and practice, practice, practice.

In all of the LMI programs, choreography is involved and following the chorie as it is written is one of the things that separates those programs from other "freestyle" programs. Well-prepared LMI instructors will NOT have cheat sheets on the stereo or their handle bars. Will there be some that do? Of course. Will there be some that deviate from the chorie? Yes, to that too. Will there be instances when the chorie slips from memory. Yes. Will your participants know? Only if you tell them, or let out a big "oops!"

The more releases you get and the more you practice and teach, the easier learning the chorie will become. Good luck!

thosknox

Jpgirl
05-23-2008, 04:35 PM
Ok I teach both Freestyle and RPM-the prep work is different for each.
Here's my drill for RPM
I watch the DVD once for hints on "fitness magic". I only watch it once because the trainers make chorey mistakes sometimes and I don't want to learn it the wrong way.
Then I take highlighters and highlight the different positions and changes so the noticable when I ride.
Then I climb onto the bike with my notes on the side and ride it. Years ago I learned how to learn choreography by counting the music phrases. So when I ride I count and listen for the music phrases and any msuic cues to give the start of the phrases away.
Then I start learning track by track. Sometimes I do it in order soemtimes I do it by difficulty, sometimes I do it 3,5,7 and 2,4,6.
It usually takes me about 2 weeks to learn a whole release-going over it once a day.
Once we start switching tracks in and out-I relearn 2 at a time in a day and switch them out.

You'll find your own way that works for you. I can tell you that the LM stuff is really easy choreography to learn after you get past your first release. They're all the same really.
And yes you do have to learn it well enough to not use notes while teaching -it's usually covered at training and LM doesn't allow it.
But yes I still use timing notes for my freestyle-I try to make a new profile for every class so it's impossible to keep up with my own chorey
Good lyck

SloSpin
05-24-2008, 10:15 AM
Krista is exactly right. Use the learning style that works best for you; auditory, visual, or physical, and/or a combination of all three, and practice, practice, practice.

In all of the LMI programs, choreography is involved and following the chorie as it is written is one of the things that separates those programs from other "freestyle" programs. Well-prepared LMI instructors will NOT have cheat sheets on the stereo or their handle bars. Will there be some that do? Of course. Will there be some that deviate from the chorie? Yes, to that too. Will there be instances when the chorie slips from memory. Yes. Will your participants know? Only if you tell them, or let out a big "oops!"

The more releases you get and the more you practice and teach, the easier learning the chorie will become. Good luck!

thosknox

Very well said.
It really does get easier as time goes by...
When I first started teaching BODYFLOW® it would take me WEEKS to learn the new choreography, now a days, I can learn a whole release in a day.
Enjoy the ride!

ChocolatePizzaRedWine
05-26-2008, 08:15 PM
I don't teach RPM, but do teach other programs. For me, it works best to make a table in Word that shows how each track starts, and lists the places I most frequently mess up. (Those are my danger zones.)

I'll listen to the music while reading my notes a few times, then put the notes aside and play the music again. When I get to a spot where I mess up or don't know what's next, I look at the notes and start over from the beginning. If I mess up in the same spot again, it goes into my written table.

As others have said, it really does get quicker. Just be patient with yourself.

Paul S.
06-15-2008, 02:04 PM
I was just notified that I passed my Group Power certification (the BTS barbell class similar to Bodypump) about a month after doing my video for it, on the Winter 08 release. In the time since I had not taken or taught that release, or even listened to the music, but had taken Power classes from other instructors on other releases. The day after I got the notice, I ran through Winter and did it perfectly. I could, of course, rattle off the titles of the 10 songs on it. But ask me to do that for the cycling playlist I used 4 times last week and I couldn't do it. Since I can tape the playlist and profile to the handlebars for the cycling classes I design myself, I don't bother to memorize them. If there's something I have to memorize, I find a way to do it. Being a musician, I find it easy to match movements to the intro, verse, chorus, bridge, etc. of a song.

I've taken 5 formats of BTS classes from a dozen instructors and I've never noticed any of them even sneak a peek at notes. They mess up sometimes, occasionally pretty badly, but they keep going and it's still a workout.

ChocolatePizzaRedWine
06-16-2008, 01:39 PM
Congrats on getting your Group Power cert! Now the real fun begins!

FWIW, you'll *always* remember the release you trained on... Once you start mixing other releases in, it gets a bit harder (because there's more opportunity for confusion -- "Is this the track where we do 1 4/4 of 2 2/2s?"), but it's all good.