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camfay
05-22-2007, 10:36 AM
There are instructors at my place that recently started doing 500 jump moves in their class. There is nothing more annoying to me than crazy instructors doing what I call "popcorn jumps" where they are popping up and down like popcorn kernals. Am I just being overly concerned or is 500 jumps excessive, and if so, why exactly so I can explain it to them.

billpierce
05-22-2007, 10:54 AM
First, if the jumps are being performed properly, I'd guess it was OK. If they are performing 500 jumps in a 45 minute Spinning class (allowing for 5 minutes WU and CD), that works out to 2 count jumps (500 x 2 seconds up + 2 seconds down / 60 seconds per minute), which are too fast in my opinion.

Any clue why they are doing 500 jumps? Why not 5 or 1000? What is the purpose, other than to alleviate boredom? I personally no longer do jumps, but I do 30 second 'transitions' - coming in and out of the saddle 30 seconds at a time. I find it a bit more realistic compared to outdoor cycling and it allows the riders to take the proper time using appropriate form.

I wouldn't worry about what other instructors are doing, though. Unless riders are complaining to you, I'm not sure that you should you get involved with other instructors' business.

camfay
05-22-2007, 11:12 AM
Students are complaining because they just feel in their gut that it doesn't feel right. If an instructor is doing something that can potentially hurt students, I feel it is my duty and obligation to acknowledge it. I would never go to the instructors themselves and I would never report them to my director (unless it was something really crazy), rather I let my director know that these things are going on (without telling who is doing it) and then my director does a mass email to all instructors without singling anyone out.

I don't do 2 count jumps period. I also call them transitions and make them a longer count.

Thanks.

RaffCycles
05-22-2007, 11:38 AM
Jumps are something that people hate to love. Therefore, some istructors feel the need to beat up their students with one of the advanced moves in class and in this case seem to be using jumps for that purpose.

As mentioned by bill, the number of jumps do not matter, but form and timing do.

I once held a special challenge class for 1.5 hours and all we did was jump. The purpose was to challenge themselves with the ride. It was not a normal energy zone class, just something added to the schedule for fun. We probably did close to 800, but nothing near a popcorn jump rate.

As for the students that feel it is wrong, have them sit down and do their own thing (safely). They are right and need to assert themselves and their concerns.

keifer
05-22-2007, 07:53 PM
Our studio has done something similar to what RaffCycles, and it's the ride our people love to hate ... as for myself when I put jumps in the ride I always tell my participants that it's not about 'quantity' it's about 'quality' ... I want to see perfectly executed jumps ... so if you can only give me 15 perfect ones that's better than 50 bad ones.

Pink
05-22-2007, 09:01 PM
Brazilian MI, Giba, told a story at one of his WSSC sessions about a team ride where the MI team was challenged to do endless jumps. One of the MI's (not sure which one) wound up with a leg stress fracture.

To each his own, but jumping marathons are not for me.

SpinBob
05-22-2007, 09:19 PM
Jumps as explained to me by an MI are a drill to practice making a smooth transition from a seated to a standing position and vice versa. Just as an auto race can be lost with a flubbed gear shift, a bike race can be lost with a poor transition from a seat to a standing position, or vice versa. It's a timing and efficiency thing. Like many exercises, jumps lose their value when they cannot be done while maintaining proper form and control. They are not like jumping jack or dumbbell curls where the is value in reps. When riders get fatigued and begin losing form and control, they should stop doing jumps.

thosknox
05-23-2007, 08:20 AM
SpinBob,

You had me with you until you compared jumps to jumping jacks or barbell curls....every activity requires adherence to proper form. And, when done incorrectly, can lead to injury; perhaps, not immediately, but definitely over time. Think about it.

When I do jumps in class, I sometimes tell my participants that while we wouldn't do as many in succession while riding outdoors, the number we do inside has a training effect and are done to make our work outside smoother and easier.

Form is everything.

thosknox

SpinBob
05-23-2007, 08:31 AM
Okay, maybe my examples were not the best, I agree that to avoid injury, form is important in many things. How about swimming laps or running around a track? Doing shots? :D

Pick any mindless activity, jumps shouldn't be one of those, where quantity is valued over quality, that was the point I was trying to make.

Patrick
05-23-2007, 10:32 AM
Confessions of an indoor-turned-outdoor cyclist:

As I am becoming a much more proficient outdoor cyclist, I've had some internal loveloss with standing antics in general.

If standing inside were nearly half as hard as it is outside, we could make jumps realistic. But to think that they train cyclists to transition well is debatable at best. I still do them, as I think that they provide a good opportunity to learn how to transition indoors.

Of course, I also look at it this way: any outdoor cyclist in my classes know what real out-of-the-saddle work feels like, and may be able to manipulate resistance and cadence in such a way that there could be a reaped training benefit.

Patrick

Cheeze
05-23-2007, 12:02 PM
I would buy these colleagues a beer or glass of wine and then ask them where they got the idea to do 500 jumps. More than likely they'll tell you someone was at a WSSC or a ride led by Johnny G.

IMO it's unfortunate that alot of rides at WSSC or other special events do not come with a disclimer: "this is a special event - a celebration - a learning experience for instructors - etc and this ride in this form is not meant to be taken back and used in a class setting". And even if the disclaimer is heard - it is usually lost as it filters down through the instructor ranks. IMO if you are not there to understand the context of why the 500 jumps was done - you should not try to imitate the 500 jumps.

As Raffs posted I have no problem with doing a multi-jump event as long as they are advertised in advance; care is taken jumps are done properly, instructors do not force/encourage students to jump past their limit and that these events are done only once-in-a-while as "special events".

I feel jumps on an IDC are a good way to train the transitioning mucles in the lower body for riding outdoors as long as they mirror outdoors transitions vs up-and-down as fast as you can knock 'em off. But IMO they are not the best way to rev up HR intensity for an extended period of time.

Finally one reason for multi-jump rides or events is to train the mental component. Dealing with the anxiety. staying calm and controlled when things are going crazy, staying focused as it starts to hurt, maintaining proper form when your legs have thrown up the stop sign.

And ................ if the instructor can't do 500 jumps with correct form - should he/she be asking their students to do 'em?

Just my slice of Cheeze

jsejt
05-23-2007, 12:34 PM
There are instructors at my place that recently started doing 500 jump moves in their class. There is nothing more annoying to me than crazy instructors doing what I call "popcorn jumps" where they are popping up and down like popcorn kernals. Am I just being overly concerned or is 500 jumps excessive, and if so, why exactly so I can explain it to them.


Quite simply....it sounds boring.

SpinBob
05-23-2007, 02:38 PM
...If standing inside were nearly half as hard as it is outside, we could make jumps realistic. But to think that they train cyclists to transition well is debatable at best...Patrick you are quite right, I was talking conceptually rather than reality. I should have said the concept of jumps. Sorry. :o

camfay
05-24-2007, 01:43 PM
I would buy these colleagues a beer or glass of wine and then ask them where they got the idea to do 500 jumps. More than likely they'll tell you someone was at a WSSC or a ride led by Johnny G.

IMO it's unfortunate that alot of rides at WSSC or other special events do not come with a disclimer: "this is a special event - a celebration - a learning experience for instructors - etc and this ride in this form is not meant to be taken back and used in a class setting". And even if the disclaimer is heard - it is usually lost as it filters down through the instructor ranks. IMO if you are not there to understand the context of why the 500 jumps was done - you should not try to imitate the 500 jumps.

As Raffs posted I have no problem with doing a multi-jump event as long as they are advertised in advance; care is taken jumps are done properly, instructors do not force/encourage students to jump past their limit and that these events are done only once-in-a-while as "special events".

I feel jumps on an IDC are a good way to train the transitioning mucles in the lower body for riding outdoors as long as they mirror outdoors transitions vs up-and-down as fast as you can knock 'em off. But IMO they are not the best way to rev up HR intensity for an extended period of time.

Finally one reason for multi-jump rides or events is to train the mental component. Dealing with the anxiety. staying calm and controlled when things are going crazy, staying focused as it starts to hurt, maintaining proper form when your legs have thrown up the stop sign.

And ................ if the instructor can't do 500 jumps with correct form - should he/she be asking their students to do 'em?

Just my slice of Cheeze

Ok Cheeze-I appreciate the reasoning behind why jumps were created, but the people who come to my classes very rarely actually ride a bike outdoors. They come to the classes for fun and fitness, not to become better outdoor cyclists. Where do jumps fit into that? Fundamentally, can you tell me why I should be doing jumps with my non-outdoor cycling people, i.e., what the benefits are? Then, can you tell me why 500 jumps would or would not provide any benefits to these same students?

I just want clarity on the issue, especially in regards to possible safety issues.

RaffCycles
05-24-2007, 02:15 PM
Of course, I also look at it this way: any outdoor cyclist in my classes know what real out-of-the-saddle work feels like, and may be able to manipulate resistance and cadence in such a way that there could be a reaped training benefit.


DING!!!! DING!!! DING!!! We have a winner!!!

This is the whole point of what Keping it Real is about. Just ask Jennifer Sage. I remember from one of her rides at a WSSC, and it still is with me today, that resistance should be realistic and your effort should feel like it does when riding outside outside. As an outdoor cyclist who moved indoors as well, I can coach what it is supposed to feel like when you are on a hill or flat outdoors.

Paul S.
05-24-2007, 08:56 PM
I would buy these colleagues a beer or glass of wine and then ask them where they got the idea to do 500 jumps....
Save your beer money! It's right in the Spinning Instructor Manual, at least in my 2004 edition. Page 2.21 has a profile with symbols for 500, 250, and 100 jumps! At just two seconds up, two seconds down, just those jumps would take almost a full hour. I think we had a discussion about this awhile ago, and someone said those profiles were for the instructor's own training, not the general population, but I still can't imagine doing that many jumps myself.

I took another instructor's class twice, about a month apart, and both times on the last working song he did "200 jumps". Actually they were combination jumps, going from seated to position 2 to 3 to 2 and repeating the cycle, and taking one count on each change, so it was only 50 jump cycles, but by the end of them I really wondered what was the point of doing so many jumps.

Any MI out there care to comment on the profile with 850 jumps? Is it still in the current edition of the SIM?

camfay
05-24-2007, 09:03 PM
Save your beer money! It's right in the Spinning Instructor Manual, at least in my 2004 edition. Page 2.21 has a profile with symbols for 500, 250, and 100 jumps! At just two seconds up, two seconds down, just those jumps would take almost a full hour. I think we had a discussion about this awhile ago, and someone said those profiles were for the instructor's own training, not the general population, but I still can't imagine doing that many jumps myself.

I took another instructor's class twice, about a month apart, and both times on the last working song he did "200 jumps". Actually they were combination jumps, going from seated to position 2 to 3 to 2 and repeating the cycle, and taking one count on each change, so it was only 50 jump cycles, but by the end of them I really wondered what was the point of doing so many jumps.

Any MI out there care to comment on the profile with 850 jumps? Is it still in the current edition of the SIM?

Man that's discouraging. The director just might pull out her trusty old manual...

Cheeze
05-24-2007, 09:47 PM
I think Paul's nailed it. I forgot about those profiles at the end of Phase II. I also think you're right about the instructor training.

The last two paragraphs of 1.02; the Introduction on 2.02; and page 2.03 will confirm that the manual is intended as instructor training. I will be the first to admit that the manual is extremely grey as far as what is to be instructor training and what can be carried over into our classes - but looking at the Phase I and Phase II Instructor Training in the manual - IMO the intent is to intimately learn the movements through long hours in the saddle while developing the fitness base required to instruct.

So I guess if you Spin just to get your HR up for 45-60 minutes 500 jump classes are legal - since it's in the manual. But I don't think that was the intent of 2.21. If all you want to do is get your HR up; cadence + resistance = HR is much much safer than mega-jumps. Doing that many jumps eventually one's form starts to suck, then your body looses proper alignment with the bike, your knees get exposed, the naughty bits take a beating as folks bounce on the saddle on landing, and it's gotta be hell on the pedals, crank arms and BB. Plus in these mega-jump classes they are usually counting off the jumps as everyone is doing them together. Subsequently the person who should stop before 500 usually feels compelled to continue beyond their limit. People by nature are competitive. No one wants to be the first one dropped. IMO I just don't see good things coming from this type of class (more potential harm than benefit) - unless you train up to it like a RDEZ or like the profiles on 2.21.

My slice of Cheeze. Go ahead and plug in the grille if you want to.

Hilly
05-25-2007, 01:02 AM
I would buy these colleagues a beer or glass of wine and then ask them where they got the idea to do 500 jumps. More than likely they'll tell you someone was at a WSSC or a ride led by Johnny G.

IMO it's unfortunate that alot of rides at WSSC or other special events do not come with a disclimer: "this is a special event - a celebration - a learning experience for instructors - etc and this ride in this form is not meant to be taken back and used in a class setting". And even if the disclaimer is heard - it is usually lost as it filters down through the instructor ranks. IMO if you are not there to understand the context of why the 500 jumps was done - you should not try to imitate the 500 jumps.

As Raffs posted I have no problem with doing a multi-jump event as long as they are advertised in advance; care is taken jumps are done properly, instructors do not force/encourage students to jump past their limit and that these events are done only once-in-a-while as "special events".

I feel jumps on an IDC are a good way to train the transitioning mucles in the lower body for riding outdoors as long as they mirror outdoors transitions vs up-and-down as fast as you can knock 'em off. But IMO they are not the best way to rev up HR intensity for an extended period of time.

Finally one reason for multi-jump rides or events is to train the mental component. Dealing with the anxiety. staying calm and controlled when things are going crazy, staying focused as it starts to hurt, maintaining proper form when your legs have thrown up the stop sign.

And ................ if the instructor can't do 500 jumps with correct form - should he/she be asking their students to do 'em?

Just my slice of Cheeze

I'll take some wine with my cheese, please. :D

I agree that jumps can help train the legs to make smooth transitions. But why so many? Seems to me you'd experience diminishing returns after the first few dozen. Like others have stated, I'd rather see 5 excellent jumps than 50 poor ones. And the more you do, the more fatigued you'll get, the worse your form becomes, etc. etc.

As others have asked -- what's the point? What does the instructor hope to accomplish with so many jumps?

camfay
05-25-2007, 03:10 PM
I think Paul's nailed it. I forgot about those profiles at the end of Phase II. I also think you're right about the instructor training.

The last two paragraphs of 1.02; the Introduction on 2.02; and page 2.03 will confirm that the manual is intended as instructor training. I will be the first to admit that the manual is extremely grey as far as what is to be instructor training and what can be carried over into our classes - but looking at the Phase I and Phase II Instructor Training in the manual - IMO the intent is to intimately learn the movements through long hours in the saddle while developing the fitness base required to instruct.

So I guess if you Spin just to get your HR up for 45-60 minutes 500 jump classes are legal - since it's in the manual. But I don't think that was the intent of 2.21. If all you want to do is get your HR up; cadence + resistance = HR is much much safer than mega-jumps. Doing that many jumps eventually one's form starts to suck, then your body looses proper alignment with the bike, your knees get exposed, the naughty bits take a beating as folks bounce on the saddle on landing, and it's gotta be hell on the pedals, crank arms and BB. Plus in these mega-jump classes they are usually counting off the jumps as everyone is doing them together. Subsequently the person who should stop before 500 usually feels compelled to continue beyond their limit. People by nature are competitive. No one wants to be the first one dropped. IMO I just don't see good things coming from this type of class (more potential harm than benefit) - unless you train up to it like a RDEZ or like the profiles on 2.21.

My slice of Cheeze. Go ahead and plug in the grille if you want to.

Cheeze, you are awesome! How can anyone argue with your explanation of why 500 jumps is a BAD idea!

Thanks to ALL of you for your help and support!

camfay
06-01-2007, 10:08 AM
The director at the good Y I work at put out a mass email explaining why no one should be teaching mega-jump classes using my explanation (which was actually Cheeze's-thank-you again). Hopefully, the instructors will listen.

KarmaQueen
02-06-2010, 08:14 PM
I do all kinds of jumps. And varied speeds. Regardless of what we do, these cues always come out of my mouth first: 1) bottom line, a jump is all about making a smooth transition in&out of the saddle, aka form; 2) form over speed no matter what; 3) listen to your body--something is screaming 'don't do this', then do not do it; 4) have enough resistence on your fly wheel to support you in X position on the bike for the move.

I was a group ex dance aerobics lover for many years before, ironically the doc said, "don't jump"--meaning impactive exercise etc. So, I have the "let's switch it up" aerobics piece in my heart. Which is what a lot of general fitness peeps like in a group cardio class (time passes quickly).

Plus, I am a road cyclists, and mountain biker. I cue my outdoor peeps that if you can not make a smooth transition in and out of the saddle, it affects your ability to hold your line. Breaking that can lead to touching bikes w/another rider in a pack, going into traffic w/the road rage driver that gives you two inches when they pass, or potentially lose a race in a sprint breakaway (jump). The *speed* when I get flack of "well, I don't jump/transition that fast... I state its more of an extra cardio interval kick, and variety.

I have done a couple profiles that I titled "Jump For Joy". And the class was... you guessed it, jumps. All the different ways you can do them. NOT, just lets jump 500 or 1000 in a class. That I have never done.

The teaching lesson punchline I tell my students in that profile is: modification. "Now you see there are many ways to jump... if whatever is cued does not work for you, then do a type of jump that does".

The hands thing I just don't get. I personally never take BOTH hands off my bike in a jump. I move one hand at a time when I am doing speed jumps. One hand stays in two, the other transitions up to three while my body gets there, then my other hand joins the first hand... then back. One hand gripping the bar at all times. Safer than both hands flying at the same time.

KQ

markelmarcel
02-06-2010, 09:31 PM
Honestly, jumps get really boring to me after about 5 of them. That mixed with the fact that most people don't know how to do it correctly- they prefer to yank themselves up off the saddle with their arms and slam their butts back down over and over (I usually over-exaggerate this movement to prove that it looks silly, then have them do much 'longer' transitions - about 30 seconds, to make sure they can fluently push up with their legs and gently, with control come back down without slamming themselves on the saddle)

The reason why people think that a class full of jumps is a great idea is back to the whole "It feels like I'm working out sooooo hard!" and in reality, as we have been discussing in both the "Different 'spin' on jumps" and "Why are there so many misconceptions on indoor cycling" posts they give LESS power. Power = work. Work = you are getting benefit.

I encourage anyone, who hasn't already, to take a look at the two posts I just mentioned because there is some GREAT info on both of them!!!

catfish
02-06-2010, 10:00 PM
[QUOTE=Cheeze;56719]I would buy these colleagues a beer or glass of wine and then ask them where they got the idea to do 500 jumps. More than likely they'll tell you someone was at a WSSC or a ride led by Johnny G........

Yes I am sure of that I was doing a 12 hour ride with JG and during hour 1 of the ride he called for 500 jumps... He picked out certain people to count out 35 or so I wasn't sure I wanted to do 500 jumps so early in the ride. The fellow next to me said "don't do them!" . as a lot of the people in the ride were not going the full 12 hours... I did some of the jumps, then I got called on to count the next 35 so I just sat down, rode easy and counted to 35.... when asked about it later I replyed. "you said count 35 not do 35 I still get a chuckle out of that one
catfish

Megale
02-09-2010, 06:47 PM
This is the way and the why Multiple Jumps came to be. When doing the Race Across America he got bored. I understand that reasoning. I don't understand why we bring this into a gym where you can't tell me you know the intimate health concerns of every individual. It's a trick it should be left to charlatans, magicians and clowns. By the way, I build femoral, tibia's, hip stems and other prosthetics for joint replacements at the day job, so saying this makes it counter productive when it comes to production.
Mike

Cheeze
02-09-2010, 07:50 PM
45 Minute Class X 60 = 2700 sec/class.
2700 sec / 500 jumps = 5.4 sec allowed/jump

IMO Safe jumps are four counts up - four counts down = 8 sec/jump
8 sec x 500 jumps = 4000 seconds
4000 seconds / 60 = 66.7 minutes minimum for 500 safe jumps.

An hour straight of jumps on an indoor cycle does not appear anywhere on my personal "To Do List".

Megs I never thought about the RAM connection. Just thinking with my fingers - would the relief from boredom justify the energy expenditure of 500 jumps.

Cheeze

CycleGuy
02-10-2010, 02:00 AM
Megs I never thought about the RAM connection. Just thinking with my fingers - would the relief from boredom justify the energy expenditure of 500 jumps.

Cheeze

I doubt (admittedly, I don't know) that the 500 jumps to stave off boredom was done over an hour period (or 67 minutes). Would think it was over a longer period. 10 hours of riding is mentally challenging - especially if it is across the prairie (all flat). Imagine the RAAM! Coast mountains, Sierra's, Rockies, all fine...but between them? UGH!

Megale
02-10-2010, 10:53 AM
An hour straight of jumps on an indoor cycle does not appear anywhere on my personal "To Do List".

Megs I never thought about the RAM connection. Just thinking with my fingers - would the relief from boredom justify the energy expenditure of 500 jumps.

Cheeze
God Cheeze, I watched a video satire on the event and at the end those poor bastards and bastardettes looked like hell. Some had boards propping up their heads because their muscles could no longer hold it up. There were all kinds of remedies from conditions that they put themselves under. It talked at length to the mental stress that would come with the physical stress and sleep deprivation. If you think about recovery and the 5 spoke importance of it in the initial foundation of the program, I would think that this was a very good example of when you need recovery. So yeah I think JG did everything he could to keep long roads from talking to him.
M

Todd S
02-10-2010, 01:16 PM
I'm guessing he may have done them during his preparation for RAAM. I doubt he did them 'during' RAAM.

Geez, some of those guys rig up contraptions just to help them hold their heads up. Doubt anybody will be jumpin' if they can't hold their heads up.

Megale
02-10-2010, 02:26 PM
I'm guessing he may have done them during his preparation for RAAM. I doubt he did them 'during' RAAM.

Geez, some of those guys rig up contraptions just to help them hold their heads up. Doubt anybody will be jumpin' if they can't hold their heads up.

Todd,
He said to us he did-. The show (history channel??) documentary footage showed these poor bastages - but when I saw it they were not doing jumps. So therefor jumps do not exist and if jumps do not exist than that goes for this thread and what you are doing reading this non existent carp for right now? :)
Mike

Todd S
02-10-2010, 02:52 PM
I'll have to think about that....

Spin_me
02-10-2010, 08:02 PM
Sorry guys a cant understand and translate all, but where`s the problem to teach correct jumps and jump 500 or 800 or xxxx? jumps. First of all there´s a number of jumps, only a number there`s no must only a can!

I have a song call 1000 jumps 26:21 minutes icluding We Will Rock You - Evian 81RPM, Good Thing - Fine Young Cannibals 82 RPM, also Tainted Love, Sonne - Rammstein and and and! All Songs are about 81-83 RPM.

The basic requirement is a constant cadence, resistance and breathing.
After several minutes the body comes into a stable static state below the lactate threshold.
It is a typical "Body and Mind" and try all to reduce your heart rate class.
I like it!
Andi

Megale
02-11-2010, 02:16 PM
Sorry guys a cant understand and translate all, but where`s the problem to teach correct jumps and jump 500 or 800 or xxxx? jumps. First of all there´s a number of jumps, only a number there`s no must only a can!

I have a song call 1000 jumps 26:21 minutes icluding We Will Rock You - Evian 81RPM, Good Thing - Fine Young Cannibals 82 RPM, also Tainted Love, Sonne - Rammstein and and and! All Songs are about 81-83 RPM.

The basic requirement is a constant cadence, resistance and breathing.
After several minutes the body comes into a stable static state below the lactate threshold.
It is a typical "Body and Mind" and try all to reduce your heart rate class.
I like it!
Andi Sounds like a great mix! But let me give you my opinion on the RMI's (repetitions motion injuries) and ROM (range of motion) problems that arise form repeated movements on unstable platforms. Add that with fatigue and your (coaches) ability to control peoples ability to "keep the resistance on" which creates those stable platforms is simply not going to happen you cant control peoples movements when there is 30 of even as few as 5 in a class. In addition, I am one that tries to create a realistic environment (as much as a stationary bike is able) in my classes and these movements to me are risks and at times seem like time fillers or tricks. I am not going to tell you to stop because hey thats your assumption of risk. I am just making my position available so that newer instructors have both sides of the fence to form their own values on.
Mike

Spin_me
02-12-2010, 09:00 AM
Hi Mike,
i think there`s no real reason against jumps, whether one or hundred.
ROM is no problem because you dont modify any angle from the first to the 200th jump.
RMI can be a problem shure, 40 minutes flat with 110RPM can also be a problem, ditto 20 minutes hill with 30RPM. Conclusively the art of wisdom is critical.
Jumps are always not easy, because you have to coordinate different movements and the call of jumps is additional bad.
Less resistance, to high cadence, used to early in classes, incorrect technique, knee problems, to high HR......!
At last a jump class is the end of a long journey, called cycling with enough resistance, try all to reduce your Heart Rate and sit down if you reach your target pulse!
Nevertheless we are all here to listen to other opinions.
Andi

zoepup
02-12-2010, 05:09 PM
Once in a while.. love to tell the class we will start jumping on a hill. They are on their own. My only guidance is maintain the form and please do not jump quicker than a slow 8 count. Now.. do 300 jumps (sometimes 500). What I don't tell them is that there are only 10 minutes left after which I guesstimate that we did 300 jumps COMBINED as a team. Play with the minds.

elsaltamontes
02-13-2010, 11:06 AM
Conclusively the art of wisdom is critical

This is great advice. Although I would disagree with doing that many jumps, and the RMO/RMI details. But the point is you have thought about it, made adjustments to other variables(cadence, resistance etc.) to lower the risk. Will everyone listen? probably not. But that will happen no matter what. Anyone can make a "safe" movement/effort, riskier if they do not listen. The key of course is the level of instruction.