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View Full Version : LeMond Terminology/Descriptions



cyclefreak
07-20-2004, 07:35 AM
Accelerations (XLs): An XL is performed usually from a relatively slow pedal speed and then simply performing each consecutive stroke faster than the previous. Usually 30 seconds or more to complete one segment.

Attack: Sudden acceleration. Burst of power in an attempt to gain speed and break away.

Cadence: RPMs. Rhythm of the pedal stroke.

ILT: Isolated Leg Training. Riding with one leg in to improve pedal stroke performance; a great way to build strength especially on the upstroke.

Jumps: A technique performed using resistance while rising out of the saddle with an exploding effort. Leg speed increases very rapidly. The challenge is to maintain a controlled rapid pedal stroke of the legs while keeping the body weight centered over the lower torso and avoid transferring weight to arms or handlebars.

Racing Jumps: Same as above only with heavier resistance. Once max leg speed is reached, sit and maintain max rpm for a short period of time.

Lifts: Primarily in stationary cycling class a lift is lifting out of the saddle while pedaling at the same cadence as seated. This exercise has often been misnamed and referred to as jumps. The goal of this exercise is to maintain a consistent leg speed pace while lifting smoothly out of the saddle and returning back down.

Seated Flat: Riding while sitting in the saddle pedaling with light to moderate resistance, as if riding on a flat road.

Sprint: Pedaling as fast as possible.

ramirez_m
07-20-2004, 08:46 AM
I now have been told the difference between a jump and a lift in Reebok terms... oh happy days. I was right in my assumptions but at it is good to know for sure Thanks CF. Can someone who is JG certified please tell us(me) if the same definitions of jumps and lifts hold true in your world.:rolleyes:

Angel
07-24-2004, 08:10 PM
Hi All!
I have been certified through several programs and the one I favor is Spinning. Why? I just happen to like it best. Others are fine, but I tend to go with the orginal stuff. Anyway, here is Johnny G's description of Jumps. Keep in mind, that he is the creator so anything other than Spinning came from Spinning orginally anyway so for LeMond to say that jumps are misnamed is only HIS opinion.

page 1.14 on the JGSI manual states: "Jumps - Jumps are performed by lifting out of the saddle at intervals. This movement may be performed in TWO ways:
1) with a consistent pace - keeping the leg spped the same while shifting in and out of the saddle - and emphasizing smooth, controlledmovements; or
2) coming out of the saddle with a burst of power and pedaling at a faster rate for a period of time (as if breaking away from the pack in a race) Note: New students should be thoroughly familiar with the seated and standing positions before attempting jumps.
The challenge with jumps is to maintain a smooth transition from a seated position to a standing position while keeping your body weight over the pedals. It is important not to throw weight onto the arms or handlebars. The movement should be fluid and even, regardless of how long the jump intervals are.
Jumps are an advanced movement. Remind students to do only as many jumps as they can with correct form. Coach your students to pay attention to how their backs and knees feel. Joint discomfort or pain may be a sign of poor hip-knee-toe alignment. When form falters due to fatigue; students should return to the saddle until they ccan resume with correct form.
Give the student the ability to discover their own dynamic rhythm. Students should be encouraged to perform this challenging movement at their own pace.
Cadence: 80-110 RPM in Hand Position 2 "

Jumps on a Hill page 2.07 of the JGSI Manual states: "Jumps on a hill are a vigorous and exhilarating advanced climbing technique. They involve moving from sitting climbing to standing climbing at intervals.
Jumps on a hill build upon the skill and technique that students developed while climbing and performing jumps during Phase 1 training. This movement simulates climbing situations that are common on the road, such as:
- Breaking away from the pack - a sudden acceleration common in competitive races.
- Powering up a switchback - maintaining momentum in the steepest part of a sharp, switchback turn on a mountain road.
- Powering over the crest - maintaining momentum at the crest of the hill. Many riders let up when they finally reach the top of the hill. An enterprising racer can break away by powering over the crest.
Jumps on a hill may also be used when catching up to or 'bridging the gap' with a rider furhter ahead, or as a method of briefly stretching and changing muscles group usage. These movements are necessary when the cyclist is riding a gear (or certain amount of resistance) that is too hard to turn smoothly in the saddle for a long period of time. The cyclist ' jumps' out of the saddle and uses body weight and gravity to build momentum and power.
There are several ways to jump on a hill:
1. With heavy resistance, maintain a consistent and smooth pedaling cadence as you slide in and out of the saddle.
2. Maintain a constant level of resistance, come out of the saddle with a burst of power and increase pedal speed. Keep the speed for a short period of time, then sit and return to the initial pedaling cadence.
Note: Jumps on a hill involve switching back and forth from hand position 2 while seated and hand position 3 while standing.
Cadence Range: 60-80 RPM"

Hope this helps

Angel
07-24-2004, 08:11 PM
p.s. The term 'lifts' is never used in Spinning. :)

ramirez_m
07-26-2004, 10:38 AM
Thanks so much angel. That was exactly what I needed to read... Where do you teach???

Angel
07-26-2004, 01:50 PM
ramirez_m,
I teach in Sanford and Kennebunk, Maine. Like dlr said on the Spinning post, there is a lot of Spinning certified clubs, but the instructors don't always hold true to the program. I'm sure you get the same frustrations. I'm actually pretty open to other programs. I'm currently certified through both Spinning and Schwinn and mix the two together. I'm not that familiar with the LeMond certification, but I have heard some things. I'm sure it's gotta be pretty descent considering him being a pro cyclist and all. In fact, I'm a big fan of him. I'm just a little partial to Spinning being the original concept and seeing that Johnny created the whole indoor cycling thing. As long as I'm safe I don't really care. Ya know what I mean. Just like in a step class. One instructor has a different term used for the same move. As long as that move is safe and correct I don't care how one says it. So, enough of my rambling. Where do you teach?

Angel

jen
03-01-2006, 08:52 AM
I took Lemond. Out of a class of 16, only 2 of us teach. They don't spend enough time on teaching. None of the certs do. A dog or cat could get certified.

Velojunkie
03-26-2006, 05:14 PM
While I will agree that Johnny G. was the first to package a commercially viable program and market it nationally, he is by no means the inventor of indoor cycling. In 1932, 2 time Olympian and 18 time National Champion John Sinibaldi organized indoor training sessions for he and his teammates using ergrometers with 78 lb. flywheels. These indoor "sessions" trickled down to local racers and have been a common practice by bicycle racers for decades. The evolution of indoor cycling has been incredible and MDA/Spinning certainly is responsible for that. However, keep in mind that indoor cycling came from outdoor cycling, not the other way around.
I currently have 17 Certified Instructors at our facility, of those 17 Instructors only 5 own bicycles and 2 have never ridden outdoors since childhood.
While I have every confidence in their abilities as athletes and knowledge as Instructors, I take exception to the fact that just because they've been certified by one program or another means that they know everything there is to know about riding.
The last 3 Instructors that I interviewed for an opening at our facility, only 1 had ever ridden outside. Are you kidding me?? (I hired the real cyclist and she is one of my best.)
Well, I've stirred the bees nest up with that rant, let's see how many times I get stung. :)

oldgoat
08-15-2006, 05:39 PM
I am an intense outdoor cyclist on weekends, succesfully completing rides with names such as Son of Death Ride and Breathless Agony. Also own five high end bikes. Spinning is weekday supplementation, and a very, very effective one at that. It has significantly elevated my times, distances and recovery capability on the road.

The instructors in our club (LA Fitness, East San Diego) are almost uniformly excellent. However, the best is a devoted MTB and roadie. She understands the reason for performing certain drills, and the improvement they can foster for those who have trouble with real hills, tempo rides with collegues, etc.

Have been lurking and enjoying all of your posts for a week, as I hope to open a high end, boutique cycling/virtual reality studio in the next few months. Having a very hard time deciding on Lemond vs. NXT.

My reasons for starting the club are likely not unique, I personally want a club devoted to cycling, one with high maintenance priorities, top notch instructors, personal service, clean, cool and with a great sound system.

Now if I could just work up the guts to make the investment! :o

kszspin
08-15-2006, 05:47 PM
Oldgoat...Welcome to the forum, btw ;) . Glad to have you here! Does your user name mean you are stubborn like an old goat??:p

Good luck in your business endeavor. I'll vote you go for the NXT, love those bikes, smooth as silk, great seat too (your people will love you for that :) ).
Let us know how your plans go.
Are you also and instructor??

kszspin
08-15-2006, 05:48 PM
Never mind, you answered that! I read this thread before the Intro thread, silly me :p .

oldgoat
08-15-2006, 05:55 PM
Ahhh, the OldGoat moniker! ;)

We are a small, devoted band of climbing kooks (about 10 of us!) who flog our ancient muscles (35 to 49 years old!) up fun things like Mt. lemmon in Tucson, Montezuma Valley Road east of San Diego, and Mt. Palomar also just east of SD.

for some crazy reason, if you add in early start times, high temps, very few places to refill water bottles, it all adds up to fun! We did 8 hours on Mt. Laguna Sunday morning (and 10k plus of climbing), leaving me spinning with some of the angriest legs in the world Monday night!

Currently, I am a Sr. Product Manager for a geek firm, and have been variations of that for Apple, Sony and Dell for 15 years. I am very tired of disappearing for a few hours to spin, and making excuses...so the time has come for me to teach what I love for a living. Hoping to set up a club within the next four months. Have crunched the numbers, studied the bikes, made a few hints to the best instructors at my present club that I would like them to work in a place that LIVES cycling. San Diego has a great demographic for this, the only "downside" is the darn weather is perfect almost all the time!

That's my story! Hopefully, I can eke out a living and get my wife certified as well. Thinking I will likely begin training in a few weeks, starting with Spinning certs, and progressing to lemond as well.

Brett

Todd S
08-15-2006, 06:11 PM
I am an intense outdoor cyclist on weekends, succesfully completing rides with names such as Son of Death Ride and Breathless Agony. Also own five high end bikes. Spinning is weekday supplementation, and a very, very effective one at that. It has significantly elevated my times, distances and recovery capability on the road.

The instructors in our club (LA Fitness, East San Diego) are almost uniformly excellent. However, the best is a devoted MTB and roadie. She understands the reason for performing certain drills, and the improvement they can foster for those who have trouble with real hills, tempo rides with collegues, etc.

Have been lurking and enjoying all of your posts for a week, as I hope to open a high end, boutique cycling/virtual reality studio in the next few months. Having a very hard time deciding on Lemond vs. NXT.

My reasons for starting the club are likely not unique, I personally want a club devoted to cycling, one with high maintenance priorities, top notch instructors, personal service, clean, cool and with a great sound system.

Now if I could just work up the guts to make the investment! :o

If you're really targeting the serious cycling folks as a market, I wouldn't pick either of the above bikes.

If you can afford it, I would go with either the older, tried and true Velodynes ( http://www.velodynesports.com/ ) where folks would be able to bring their own bikes, or what sounds like soon-to-be-available commercial version of the CycleOps bike w/ power meter ( http://www.saris.com/p-196-pro-300pt.aspx ). Both offer accurate power measurement and high inertia for a realistic road feel.

If I had to make a prediction, within a few years the training protocols prescribed by most serious cycling coaches will all be prescribed based on time and power rather than HR and distance. Folks like Hunter Allen, Andy Coggan, Joe Friel, and others seem to be out on the forefront with this stuff. USA Cycling has done a nice job too with their coaches' training program using power-based training. I wouldn't make an investment without first learning as much as you can about training with power.

kszspin
08-15-2006, 06:18 PM
Mt. Lemmon! Oh yeah baby! We (DH and I) love that place, we love everything about Tucson, it's our future destination (someday, maybe). We climbed Mt Lemmon back in '99 when I was 8 mos pregnant in August. But it was 20 degrees cooler up there ;) .

So what do you say when you go to lunch :rolleyes: ...."bye guys, I'll be back at <cough> , ok call me if something comes up!"
They must think you're out drinking your lunch (or something) when you come back a couple hours later from class. Guess you better come out of the closet and make it official. "Hi, my name's Brett and I'm a Spinning addict." :D

Happy you are here, lots to learn. We're normally a nice bunch, (most) don't bite. :p

JFK
08-15-2006, 06:49 PM
Ahhh, the OldGoat moniker! ;)

That's my story! Hopefully, I can eke out a living and get my wife certified as well. Thinking I will likely begin training in a few weeks, starting with Spinning certs, and progressing to lemond as well.

Brett

Good luck, Brett, sounds like a great plan! Kiss that cube farm goodbye. :D

oldgoat
08-15-2006, 11:01 PM
Todd,

I have looked at both of those, and don't want to target only the serious cyclist. They will be about 25% of the mix. The nergy of spin classes, the cameraderie afterwards, the friendships created...all are my key.

However, the new Cycle Ops with power meters (ughh, $1800 per) might make a great "hybrid." Part get healthy, part Lance. Unlike the Computrainer, it measures individual power, and I like having a "competitive" room for those who want to know their power, those of their neighbors, and get the VR experience of exotic climbs. I also can not afford to stock a 5000 sq ft room with 30 or so Velodyns! The hassles of having extra frames for those who forget their bikes, all sounds more complicated than I can start with. Someday, perhaps!

Owning a Power Tap, I do agree 100% with you it is far more effective on rides than knowing your heart rate. A power meter to me is a constant feedback loop on pedal efficiency, seat position, stem length. I vary one thing, take the same hill and see the effect in WATTS!



If you're really targeting the serious cycling folks as a market, I wouldn't pick either of the above bikes.

If you can afford it, I would go with either the older, tried and true Velodynes ( http://www.velodynesports.com/ ) where folks would be able to bring their own bikes, or what sounds like soon-to-be-available commercial version of the CycleOps bike w/ power meter ( http://www.saris.com/p-196-pro-300pt.aspx ). Both offer accurate power measurement and high inertia for a realistic road feel.

If I had to make a prediction, within a few years the training protocols prescribed by most serious cycling coaches will all be prescribed based on time and power rather than HR and distance. Folks like Hunter Allen, Andy Coggan, Joe Friel, and others seem to be out on the forefront with this stuff. USA Cycling has done a nice job too with their coaches' training program using power-based training. I wouldn't make an investment without first learning as much as you can about training with power.

oldgoat
08-15-2006, 11:27 PM
I have been very fortunate, my former boss at Sony is the guy who got me addicted to cycling. Although he was a hard worker, I quickly learned that "going for a ride" was a good exscuse for any length abscence! Besides, i usally worked late at night so he did not care when, as long as the work was done.

The current company is full of healthy people, and they all disappear as well for long runs, lunches, etc. Besides, I am usually pretty good about making the boring, 5:45/6 am classes (boring because there are not many people there).



Mt. Lemmon! Oh yeah baby! We (DH and I) love that place, we love everything about Tucson, it's our future destination (someday, maybe). We climbed Mt Lemmon back in '99 when I was 8 mos pregnant in August. But it was 20 degrees cooler up there ;) .

So what do you say when you go to lunch :rolleyes: ...."bye guys, I'll be back at <cough> , ok call me if something comes up!"
They must think you're out drinking your lunch (or something) when you come back a couple hours later from class. Guess you better come out of the closet and make it official. "Hi, my name's Brett and I'm a Spinning addict." :D

Happy you are here, lots to learn. We're normally a nice bunch, (most) don't bite. :p