PDA

View Full Version : Very toucy subjetct!



bodyimaje
09-09-2006, 10:40 AM
The other day I was subbing and I noticed that one of the students in the class seemed to be Mentally challenged. He had a healthy looking body but he was incoherent in his speaking. He is an amazing kid, with a lot of stamina and strenght. But my concern was.......He was WAYYYYYYY TO AGRESSIVE on the bike. I kept an eye on himf or some time and I started speaking about form and safety in general to the class (about 15 members) One of the members (one of my regulars from another class) called me over and said "I guess so and so (the regular instructorf or this class) didn't warn you about Johnny(being the special kid).
The member said that the other instructor doesn't adjust him, she just lets him do his own thing.

I got worried, since he was pedalling agressively (mind you he had resistance on his bike the whole time,) you should have seen his face he was in heaven, with a graceful smile eyes closed and focused. He could have broken the pedals (yes he was going very agressive) or hurt himself.
Not only was he causing danger to himself but also to his two neighboring bikes.

I regret not saying anything to him directly but I spoke to the fitness coordinator and she will have a talk with the regular Instructor for follow up.
How would you handle such a case in your class......
G

rick316
09-09-2006, 10:50 AM
I would speak to him and explain your concerns.If I didn't get anywhere,I would speak to his parents to get through to him the safety aspects.It's only a tough situation because it wasn't dealt with at the onset.:)

kszspin
09-09-2006, 12:38 PM
I got worried, since he was pedalling agressively (mind you he had resistance on his bike the whole time,) you should have seen his face he was in heaven, with a graceful smile eyes closed and focused. He could have broken the pedals (yes he was going very agressive) or hurt himself.
Not only was he causing danger to himself but also to his two neighboring bikes.

G

I'm trying to get a clear picture in my mind of the scenario you're describing. What does pedaling "aggressively" mean? If he has decent resistance like you say how is he going to hurt himself? How is he causing danger to the bikes next to him?
Sorry I'm just not clear on this, especially since you say "he was in heaven, with a graceful smile eyes closed and focused".
Don't we try to get that "look" out of most of our participants? :confused:

tdeckert
09-09-2006, 01:41 PM
Funny, I have an adult in my class who is also mildly mentally gifted (as I like to say it :) ) and his name is also Jimmy! Although I don't have a problem with him riding out of control - he's just a little hard to understand when he speaks, but we love him!

First, how wonderful that your student Jimmy can do something good for himself, that he loves and makes him happy - that's what it's all about! Second, if he truly is pedaling aggressively with a big gear, I wouldn't think he (or anyone else for that matter) wouldn't be able to do this for long before exhaustion sets in. Could it be that he "looks" like he's riding with enough resistance, but really is not, which would be a safety issue?

If he looks like he's going to cause harm to other riders, is it because his body is rocking side to side (thrashing around) or is he actually "rocking" the bike?

I say embrace Jimmy and keep him loving the class; however, if it is a safety issue, maybe it would be easier to address it with him one-on-one. One suggestion would be to try a little private instruction; ride side-by-side with him and encourage him to "ride like you" - make it a game. You could also seek help from his parents, or even somebody who deals with special needs people (like a job coach or physician).

I know it isn't always easy to help somebody who may take us out of our comfort zone - it is a huge responsibility. One thing I have learned - gifted people are some of the happiest people you'll EVERY meet - they don't let the "small stuff" bother them - they LOVE life and I seriously doubt if Jimmy would have his feelings hurt because you want to help him. If anything, he'll love class even more!

T

bodyimaje
09-09-2006, 07:32 PM
I'm trying to get a clear picture in my mind of the scenario you're describing. What does pedaling "aggressively" mean? If he has decent resistance like you say how is he going to hurt himself? How is he causing danger to the bikes next to him?
Sorry I'm just not clear on this, especially since you say "he was in heaven, with a graceful smile eyes closed and focused".
Don't we try to get that "look" out of most of our participants? :confused:
KSZSPIN, I should have been more clear, his had heavy resistance and he was probably pedaling at a120rpm not for a short period of time but for several minutes, then he'd stand up with the rest of us then go back down and continue pedalling away.

bodyimaje
09-09-2006, 07:36 PM
Funny, I have an adult in my class who is also mildly mentally gifted (as I like to say it :) ) and his name is also Jimmy! Although I don't have a problem with him riding out of control - he's just a little hard to understand when he speaks, but we love him!

First, how wonderful that your student Jimmy can do something good for himself, that he loves and makes him happy - that's what it's all about! Second, if he truly is pedaling aggressively with a big gear, I wouldn't think he (or anyone else for that matter) wouldn't be able to do this for long before exhaustion sets in. Could it be that he "looks" like he's riding with enough resistance, but really is not, which would be a safety issue?

If he looks like he's going to cause harm to other riders, is it because his body is rocking side to side (thrashing around) or is he actually "rocking" the bike?

I say embrace Jimmy and keep him loving the class; however, if it is a safety issue, maybe it would be easier to address it with him one-on-one. One suggestion would be to try a little private instruction; ride side-by-side with him and encourage him to "ride like you" - make it a game. You could also seek help from his parents, or even somebody who deals with special needs people (like a job coach or physician).

I know it isn't always easy to help somebody who may take us out of our comfort zone - it is a huge responsibility. One thing I have learned - gifted people are some of the happiest people you'll EVERY meet - they don't let the "small stuff" bother them - they LOVE life and I seriously doubt if Jimmy would have his feelings hurt because you want to help him. If anything, he'll love class even more!

T

Jimmy is not my regular student, he attends the sunday 9;30 am class and I just happened to sub that class, I probably won't have to do it for another 6months. If he comes to my class I will definatley evaluate him again and then take your suggestions that I reallylike Tdeckert.
you mentioned exhaustian, well after 3 minutes he would get really tired, recover and then go on at it again. His body was tense during this extended sprint if you would, he stayed leaned to his right inand pedalled with his dominant leg.....it's difficult to describe here, but I will definately speak with him in person and try to do the side by side game....I"m sure it'll go well. He was so kind to me, he actually made my day brighter that morning.

ACinNJ
09-09-2006, 09:34 PM
The only thing I really would say is if the person is a member, cleared by management to participate in classes, what is your concern? I would speak to this person's guardian or caregiver. express your concerns about how their form or cadence might not be the best and enjoy the fact that this person derives joy from your class.

We keep stating that the ride is "theirs"...well...let it be then.

bodyimaje
09-10-2006, 10:36 AM
The only thing I really would say is if the person is a member, cleared by management to participate in classes, what is your concern? I would speak to this person's guardian or caregiver. express your concerns about how their form or cadence might not be the best and enjoy the fact that this person derives joy from your class.

We keep stating that the ride is "theirs"...well...let it be then.
AcinNJ the ride is theirs indeed, but not when they have a cadence of 130 rpm for 4 minutes at a time. right?

ACinNJ
09-10-2006, 11:42 AM
AcinNJ the ride is theirs indeed, but not when they have a cadence of 130 rpm for 4 minutes at a time. right?

Well...in the SIM the max cadence is 110 rpm. If you go 130, it's 20 rpm or about 1/3 of a stroke every second. That seems dangerous to you? In 4 minutes the person will do 80 more rpm's. Without really knowing the wattage their putting out, I usually don't get that worried if I think the person looks stabile in the saddle...or their peddling the bike ratther than the bike peddling them.

Granted it's out of the JGSI range...but not that much if you break it into smaller pieces.

raptor
09-10-2006, 01:01 PM
Well...in the SIM the max cadence is 110 rpm. If you go 130, it's 20 rpm or about 1/3 of a stroke every second. That seems dangerous to you? In 4 minutes the person will do 80 more rpm's. Without really knowing the wattage their putting out, I usually don't get that worried if I think the person looks stabile in the saddle...or their peddling the bike ratther than the bike peddling them.

Granted it's out of the JGSI range...but not that much if you break it into smaller pieces.

I view the speed limits we're given as our rules, not the riders'. Lots of experienced riders can spin above 110 RPM for long periods of time, and sprinting can go much higher. When my profile calls for high cadence, I often cue it as "as fast as they can control" while keeping myself within the limits. But if I'm sprinting as a member of a class, I ignore the speed limit.

Lynn

ACinNJ
09-10-2006, 09:15 PM
I view the speed limits we're given as our rules, not the riders'. Lots of experienced riders can spin above 110 RPM for long periods of time, and sprinting can go much higher. When my profile calls for high cadence, I often cue it as "as fast as they can control" while keeping myself within the limits. But if I'm sprinting as a member of a class, I ignore the speed limit.

Lynn

I agreee, but they're really the guidelines we're instructed to teach within. There are a lot of reasons to stay with in these guidelines, however the ability to put out proper effort and control the weighted flywheel is always a subjective call.

I always thought 120 would be a better max cadence only because it's easier to count. 2 strokes for every second or 2 turns per "one thousand one".

raptor
09-11-2006, 11:41 PM
I had a similar experience, however the person was not mentally challenged. We were doing a seated sprint and his legs were going so fast that the back of the bike actually started scooting to the side. I was a little worried because I thought if his foot were to un-clip he would be in some serious trouble, I kept cueing to add tension, but he was a maniac I tell you. His eyes were closed, and I don't know if he heard a word I said, but I ended the sprint a little early because he made me concerned.

I'm going to say that if he was shaking the bike, he was NOT sprinting properly. And yes, it's an injury waiting to happen. I can spin the pedals 200+ RPM and not bounce - myself or the bike. (Though I haven't tried recently.)

Lynn

Ernestine
09-13-2006, 06:16 AM
Its seems while we are on the subject I will throw this out there---
How have you dealt successfully with the regular spinner that no matter how you coach (slow your cadence down to mine with resistance, not just slow your pace, you are just spinning your wheels...) will not add the correct or even appreciable resistance to their bike? I have a few that just stay in that very light range, no health issues that I know of, and are missing alot of benefit to their workout and increasing their strength.

Any suggestions?

Earnestly~ Ernestine

JoyofSpin
09-13-2006, 06:22 AM
Quietly walk over to the person and without the mic say why don't you try some more resistance. Your legs look strong today. Or something to that effect. If there is an open bike next to the person I jump on and say match my legs. If it's more than one sometimes I'll say how are your legs feeling? When I get a great or similar comment yelled back. I say Good now turn up the resistance! - Joy

alexkaboom
09-13-2006, 07:59 AM
Its seems while we are on the subject I will throw this out there---
How have you dealt successfully with the regular spinner that no matter how you coach (slow your cadence down to mine with resistance, not just slow your pace, you are just spinning your wheels...) will not add the correct or even appreciable resistance to their bike? I have a few that just stay in that very light range, no health issues that I know of, and are missing alot of benefit to their workout and increasing their strength.

Any suggestions?

Earnestly~ Ernestine

Some people don't like to add resistance, some people just don't listen to your cues, you can try coaching her individually as sugested before but remember, there is only so much we can do... if someone is determined to do whatever they want, so long they are not endangering someone nearby, you cannot force them to do otherwise.

Continue to give your class in a professional manner and concentrate on the 90% of members that are there to take your class.

Alex

ACinNJ
09-13-2006, 09:00 AM
When we continuously use he expression, "it's their workout" you either buy into it or you don't.

raptor
09-13-2006, 06:21 PM
Yep. Maybe they are using your class for some much-needed (and boring) recovery? (Of course your class isn't boring, but like Todd said a few days ago, doing recovery indoors is about the same as taking a nap.) :) Keep in mind that that moderate work they're doing is still burning calories, and at that level a large %age is fat.

With that in mind, if it bugs you enough, you could check in from time to time to see if they're happy with their fitness lifestyle and their results. If they happen to say no, there's your opening to suggest they work harder. If they say yes, why the heck would you want to change 'em?

Lynn

Ernestine
09-15-2006, 10:17 AM
:D Thank you for all your help! I will certainly try those suggestions with my "bouncers" .

Ernestine

snowbunny
09-19-2006, 06:24 AM
Maybe if you talk with Jimmy, and ask him to watch you. The "do as I do". Watch how fast my legs are going, and don't go any faster. It may help.

I know that even with my regular members, if we are in heavy resistance, and it looks like they are going much faster, I suggest they look at my cadence and adjust their resistance so we are all riding the same hill, and that they didn't take a detour to the ice cream shop.

Good luck !

Cheeze
09-19-2006, 11:33 AM
Back to the original question. Body do you know anyone in your local school district you is certified in and/or teaches special education?. If you do I suggest you connect with them for some advice. My wife is an elementary school principal and has dual certifications in Special Ed and at times has given me some great (and workable) suggestions. Good luck

Cheeze