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cyclefreak
04-05-2006, 05:59 AM
I need an event to train for this year. The past two years, I've done the Ride for the Roses but I need something new. I want something well-supported and hopefully scenic. I had planned to do the Lake Tahoe ride June 4 but when I went to register, it had already sold out. :(

Anyone got any ideas? Done any cool rides? I'm in Oklahoma and can fly to an event but if it's drivable that would be even better.

Thanks!

JFK
04-05-2006, 07:52 AM
I would take a cruise over to active.com or bikereg.com and search under cycling activities in the geographic areas where you're willing to go. I've found some really great events that way, from races to recreational jaunts.

Have fun and let us know what you find!

Legspeed
04-05-2006, 08:10 AM
If you want a chance to test the limits of your abilities, I would highly recommend the Texas Time Trials. This event is actually four events in one. There is a 500 mile time trial, a 24 hour time trial, a 12 hour time trial, and a 6 hour time trial. This year, it's been designated to host the North American 12 hour Championship.

For a more relaxed and social experience, I don't think you can beat the MS-150 Bike to the Brazos.

gilberth
04-05-2006, 08:21 AM
There's so many great events to choose from. Tahoe is scenic, I've done it twice. Unfortunately many good rides are on a lottery system and now full.
How about more info- how many days, miles per day, camping or motel, how much $ per day , how many miles and feet of climbing per day?
Howard
WSSC '07 Venic Beach CA
Because it's time to come home

JFK
04-05-2006, 11:59 AM
Here's one I want to do someday:
http://www.everestchallenge.com/EverestChallengeBible.htm

I know Doug Katona has done it. They tend to hold it on my birthday weekend (in September) which is really cool, except that it also coincides with some major Jewish holidays, which won't work for me.

RaffCycles
04-05-2006, 12:05 PM
If you want to travel to Grand Rapids Michigan, I did the 24 hour national challenge. You provide most of the food you need, but they have rest stops which provide water and fruits. One of the best marked routes I've ever riden.

The ride is well organized and sag support is visible along the entire route even during the night.

I've done it twice, but unfortunately, I can't make it this year.

It is held the weekend of June 17-18.

Here's a link: http://www.n24hc.org/

marnster
04-05-2006, 12:09 PM
If you come to Grand Rapids, come visit meeeeeeeeeeeee! ~Marn

megale3
04-05-2006, 01:01 PM
I would take a cruise over to active.com or bikereg.com and search under cycling activities in the geographic areas where you're willing to go. I've found some really great events that way, from races to recreational jaunts.

Have fun and let us know what you find!


Look for the STP (Seattle to Portland) on active.com its a double century which is well supported whether you are doing it in one day or two. 8000 riders of all abilities- pacelines you wouldn't believe and at the middle in Centrailia there is a college beer garden with the Tour playin on the big screen. I am a 6 time vetran of this ride and it is still the classic!
You got to come out and see your brothers and sisters in the mighty Pacific Nortwest.
Megale

Viking
04-05-2006, 09:53 PM
Hotter-then-hell
late august
wichita falls, texas

Robert
04-06-2006, 06:15 AM
I'm so envious at all the space you guys have - so easy just to start from New York and keep going until you get to Mexico!

I'm doing Land's End to John O'Groats this year (approx 1100 miles) but hoping to do the Tour de France next year.

:eek:

Not the real one, just do the whole route in June before watching the pros do it in July. Especially good, as it starts in London next year!

It's only 3000 miles - no biggie.... :rolleyes: ;)

Legspeed
04-06-2006, 12:19 PM
Robert,

Why not wait until September and do Le Tour Direct? (http://www.letourdirect.nl/index.php?id=71&sub_id=1) It's basically the entire TdF route in a single stage. Should cut down on a lot of incidental expenses. It took last year's winner a little less than 8 days to ride what it took that nancy-boy Lance to ride in 22.

gritsatsix
04-06-2006, 12:47 PM
If you love hills (and who doesn't), try the Six Gap Century in Dahlonega, GA on Sept. 24th. Parts of the course were used in the Tour de Georgia which Lance Armstrong used as prep work for the TDF. Plenty tough!

cyclefreak
04-06-2006, 09:04 PM
Gritsatsix...have you done this ride? I looked it up, I don't know if I'm capable of that kind of climbing, but I would LOVE to try it. I might shoot for the Three Gap to start.

So now my question is... how do you train for climbing like that when most of the terrain around me consists of lots and lots of flat roads? We have some hills to be sure, but nothing close to mountainous.

Anyone, anyone? I'm a glutton for punishment, I really want to try it. It looks sooo hard. :)

Legspeed
04-06-2006, 10:04 PM
Lots and lots of flat roads usually means lots and lots of wind. Long, sustained efforts into a stiff headwind make for a decent substitute.

raptor
04-07-2006, 01:17 AM
You can't get much more scenic than Utah.

We have our centuries, and the Tour of Utah will attract pro teams but have one or more events for amateurs and citizens - August. There's the 24 Hours of Moab mtb race later in the year.

Logan to Jackson in September! 200 miles or so through the mountains and valleys. I've never had the guts or form to try it, but it's a local classic. It's a semi-competitive event. (But I'm not sure how well it's supported for the non-racers.)

Lynn

raptor
04-07-2006, 01:19 AM
Lots and lots of flat roads usually means lots and lots of wind. Long, sustained efforts into a stiff headwind make for a decent substitute.

That, or hill intervals. Do the same hill six times.

Mounting six generator-powered lights on your rear wheel would also do it, or setting your rear brake to rub a la Lance Armstrong.

Lynn

Robert
04-07-2006, 04:03 AM
Robert,

Why not wait until September and do Le Tour Direct? (http://www.letourdirect.nl/index.php?id=71&sub_id=1) It's basically the entire TdF route in a single stage. Should cut down on a lot of incidental expenses. It took last year's winner a little less than 8 days to ride what it took that nancy-boy Lance to ride in 22.

:eek: Did the guy not sleep for 8 days?

My idea was to take in the scenery and the people on the way... and to still be able to walk at the end!

gritsatsix
04-07-2006, 12:45 PM
Gritsatsix...have you done this ride? I looked it up, I don't know if I'm capable of that kind of climbing, but I would LOVE to try it. I might shoot for the Three Gap to start.

So now my question is... how do you train for climbing like that when most of the terrain around me consists of lots and lots of flat roads? We have some hills to be sure, but nothing close to mountainous.

Anyone, anyone? I'm a glutton for punishment, I really want to try it. It looks sooo hard. :)

I have actually done this twice. The first time was four years ago as a "celebration" ride after completing chemo treatments. I did the Three Gap then. The climbs were challenging but not horrendous by any means. If you ride frequently outdoors you shouldn't have a problem. As I recall, there were many from Florida on this ride and they expressed your same concerns since they didn't have any mountains to train on. They all seemed to do fine.

Where I live there are no mountains either so I prepped by finding every hill that I could and climbed repeatedly in my biggest gear in order to build strength. I also did a lot of running on these same hills. This may not have been the ideal training, but it got me through.

The second time I did this ride, I was stronger (no chemo treatments), so I did the Six Gap. This was tough! Hogpen Gap, which is the fourth and steepest climb, averages a 7% grade for 7 miles with some grades at 15%. When you get over this one, you still have two more steep climbs but you feel like you can do anything!

I would recommend this ride to anyone because it is a beautiful part of the country, the ride is well organized, and you can get a better appreciation for what those TDF riders do. More importantly, you can't beat the feeling of accomplishment after doing something like this!

If you decide to do it, change your cassette to get some more climbing gears. While I trained with my biggest gears, when I did the actual ride I had plenty of "easy" gears to work with. Also, while the climbs are a concern, what is equally challenging are the descents. You will carry a lot of speed and there are switchbacks. So you can't get complacent just because you are going downhill.

Good luck!