PDA

View Full Version : Please Help



spinningclara
02-11-2006, 01:43 PM
Hi guys, Im a very new instructor and just wondering if anyone else uses the kind of bikes my club has. I see you guys talk alot about RPM's but our bikes have this little red knob with a + and - sign the more you turn it to the + side the more resistance you get.

SO HOW WOULD YOU CUE HOW MUCH RESISTANCE THEY SHOULD PUT - I can't really say (30 turns to the + lol)

Any help would be appreciated.

jjaime213
02-11-2006, 04:26 PM
Every student feels resitance different so there is no amount of resitance that you should recommend putting as a exact number. So just say things as high resistance or a resistance that allows you to mantain a pace similar than mine. If you say like 2 turs to the + maybe some one that does not have the strength in tendons and muscles to make that effort and just needs to take one turn. So the conclusion is that there is not a recommended exact amount of resistance that you should tell your students to put as individually they can take different amounts of resistances at the same pace.

Alaricnj
02-11-2006, 08:59 PM
Every student feels resitance different so there is no amount of resitance that you should recommend putting as a exact number. So just say things as high resistance or a resistance that allows you to mantain a pace similar than mine. If you say like 2 turs to the + maybe some one that does not have the strength in tendons and muscles to make that effort and just needs to take one turn. So the conclusion is that there is not a recommended exact amount of resistance that you should tell your students to put as individually they can take different amounts of resistances at the same pace.

Jamie,

I agree with you 100% that we shouldn’t describe resistance loading as “1 or 2 full turns on the resistance knob”. However I think we can still use a scale reference (i.e. 1-10).

Using a scale allows the student to perceive what they are feeling in terms of resistance. Number 5 to one student might be a 3 to someone else. I’m not sure if I’m 100% correct, but it sounds logical to me that this is acceptable.


Mike

Viking
02-12-2006, 09:04 AM
I've found using a very simple RPM formula will help put the class on the same page. I will decide an rpm range for the hill climb, TT or steady state. At the start of a "hill climb" the rpm/pace may be easy.

Rider will count each time the left knee comes up for 10 seconds - starting with zero, not one. 16 counts is about 96 rpm's. If they count 20 or 13 and are truly pedaling, they know to either add or take tension off. Often, riders will speed-up during the counting.

This is not a exact forumla. It will give the rider a starting point and help him/her decide about the tension.

Each spin bike has it's own personality, sometimes a whole turn is needed to add tension, on other bikes a quarter turn will do the same.

keifer
02-12-2006, 09:19 PM
I've always left the resistance up to the participant ... I describe the terrain i.e at the foot of a hill, riding into a head wind ... and then stating the cadence we will ride at ... this way everyone is riding at the correct cadence/HR, based on thier own physical capabilites ... the hardcore racers in the class can really crank the resistance up, while the newbie may only be able to handle a much lighter load ... if we're climibing a hill I may say something like 5 minute hill climb, we'll add resistance 4 times so they can pace how much resistance they will work their way up too ... the whole goal is to get them to stay in the cadence/HR zone you want for the terrain/class ... as their fitness level improves they will be able to handle harder resistance to get in the zone.

raptor
02-13-2006, 12:07 AM
I see you guys talk alot about RPM's

Just in case this is the nature of your misunderstanding, RPM means "revolutions per minute," and refers to pedaling cadence (speed), not resistance.

Lynn