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View Full Version : Lemond Revmaster Sport Review



DaveLeeNC
02-03-2011, 05:41 PM
While I had a lot of experience on a gym type indoor cycle (magnetic resistance) a decade ago, I don't have any spin cycle experience. So my input should be taken with a grain of salt. But here goes.

I ended up ordering the Revmaster directly from Lemond. Roughly 36 hours after placing the order online, it was out for shipping. Roughly 6 days later it arrived (in NC). While it was a Fedex shipment, the delivery had to be scheduled (they called a day before delivery).

It arrived in a single box that (in my case) revealed minimal exterior damage. This thing is heavy (over 100 pounds), but is a box that a 62 year old male can shove around the house to whatever room it was intended.

Assembly is pretty simple. The bike arrives basically assembled except for

handlebars
pedals
front/rear cross braces
seat (a kind of 'large size' racing saddle type)
water bottle holder (I passed on that one)
It comes with all the tools required for assembly with two minor exceptions (covered later). The toughest thing that I had to do was threading the left side pedal where the threads were pretty clogged up with paint. But overall this was pretty darn simple.

Adjustments are easy to make and would seem (from my perspective) to cover a pretty wide range of various human sizes (although I am pretty average at 5' 9"). So I did a quick fit (took maybe 2 minutes) and off I went for a spin. Seat post height, handlebar height, and front/back seat adjustments are easy with release-type handles.

The only issue that I had was a most annoying squeak that was clearly coming from the leather resistance pad/flywheel. So I took off the resistance pad holder thingey, lubricated the pad with the oil that was supplied, and the squeak is gone.

This thing is extremely smooth, and gives the over-all sense of being a heavy duty and well constructed product (note that it is not the 'Pro' version-this is the Sport). And to steal a something from Monty Python, I have heard dead parrots make more noise than this thing makes.

Resistance adjustments are simple, smooth, and cover a very wide range. Pedaling out of the saddle feels very natural. I don't sense that more mass in the flywheel would make a huge difference. But I don't think that you would want less.

Pedals are a 'toe cage' type which works well for me - I can imagine a true roadie wanting to substitute their own pedals (these folks would also notice the lack of drop-type handle bars as well, I think). But I am quite pleased with the product. The things that I did add was a low-end byke computer for cadence feedback and an HRM.

The additional tools that you will need are

1) An extra Allen wrench to remove the leadther resistance pad holder thingey (for pad lubrication). You need to use an Allen wrench on both ends of the nut/bolt assembly.

2) An open end wrench for final seat adjustments. While the seat post height and front/back position are adjustable via release handles, seat tilt and 'where the seat points' need an open end wrench. Hardly a big problem.

FWIW.

dave

ps. This bike looks 'sleek and stylish' and that turns out to be important in my case. Our 3rd bedroom shares the function of being a (very occasional) guest bedroom and also being my office - the bike goes in this room. I was ready to buy a used Revmaster (one of the prior Tdf Yellow colored ones) and my wife really didn't like the look (mostly a color thing). But she was very comfortable with the 'sleek/black look' of the Sport as it will share space with our very occasional guests.

eggweed
03-28-2013, 07:21 AM
Bought this bike based on user reviews and Hoist web site stating all bikes 100% inspected. I am now on my third defective bike. The 1st bike had a defective flywheel and handle bars that would not sit straight. The flywheel had a dent which caused a snapping noise with every revolution. Swapped it for another bike and this one had an oval shaped flywheel which caused a much worse noise and a jumping sensation in the handle bars. Now one month later and 3rd bike finally no flywheel issues but having handle bar issues not sitting straight. Very frustrated this is not a cheap bike and fed up. Hoist has some major manufacturing issues this is by no means a coincidence 3 defective bikes in a row I think not. They will not compensate and take responsibility just want to keep swapping parts and bikes until they get it right. I have to live with the handlebars not sitting straight because I don`t trust not getting a bike with more and worse defects. These bike are heavy and it has been a hassle. The whole experience with buying Hoist bike has been terrible. It`s to bad because I am sure it would have been a great buy if not for the defects. The bike is quiet and smooth. 5 stars for that.. it just took 3 bikes , one month, lots of emails,phone calls to the store, tech visits, 5 trips up and down stairs etc.... I hope this review keeps people from going through what I have.... buy something else or make sure your 100% satisfied before leaving the store.










While I had a lot of experience on a gym type indoor cycle (magnetic resistance) a decade ago, I don't have any spin cycle experience. So my input should be taken with a grain of salt. But here goes.

I ended up ordering the Revmaster directly from Lemond. Roughly 36 hours after placing the order online, it was out for shipping. Roughly 6 days later it arrived (in NC). While it was a Fedex shipment, the delivery had to be scheduled (they called a day before delivery).

It arrived in a single box that (in my case) revealed minimal exterior damage. This thing is heavy (over 100 pounds), but is a box that a 62 year old male can shove around the house to whatever room it was intended.

Assembly is pretty simple. The bike arrives basically assembled except for
handlebars
pedals
front/rear cross braces
seat (a kind of 'large size' racing saddle type)
water bottle holder (I passed on that one)
It comes with all the tools required for assembly with two minor exceptions (covered later). The toughest thing that I had to do was threading the left side pedal where the threads were pretty clogged up with paint. But overall this was pretty darn simple.

Adjustments are easy to make and would seem (from my perspective) to cover a pretty wide range of various human sizes (although I am pretty average at 5' 9"). So I did a quick fit (took maybe 2 minutes) and off I went for a spin. Seat post height, handlebar height, and front/back seat adjustments are easy with release-type handles.

The only issue that I had was a most annoying squeak that was clearly coming from the leather resistance pad/flywheel. So I took off the resistance pad holder thingey, lubricated the pad with the oil that was supplied, and the squeak is gone.

This thing is extremely smooth, and gives the over-all sense of being a heavy duty and well constructed product (note that it is not the 'Pro' version-this is the Sport). And to steal a something from Monty Python, I have heard dead parrots make more noise than this thing makes.

Resistance adjustments are simple, smooth, and cover a very wide range. Pedaling out of the saddle feels very natural. I don't sense that more mass in the flywheel would make a huge difference. But I don't think that you would want less.

Pedals are a 'toe cage' type which works well for me - I can imagine a true roadie wanting to substitute their own pedals (these folks would also notice the lack of drop-type handle bars as well, I think). But I am quite pleased with the product. The things that I did add was a low-end byke computer for cadence feedback and an HRM.

The additional tools that you will need are

1) An extra Allen wrench to remove the leadther resistance pad holder thingey (for pad lubrication). You need to use an Allen wrench on both ends of the nut/bolt assembly.

2) An open end wrench for final seat adjustments. While the seat post height and front/back position are adjustable via release handles, seat tilt and 'where the seat points' need an open end wrench. Hardly a big problem.

FWIW.

dave

ps. This bike looks 'sleek and stylish' and that turns out to be important in my case. Our 3rd bedroom shares the function of being a (very occasional) guest bedroom and also being my office - the bike goes in this room. I was ready to buy a used Revmaster (one of the prior Tdf Yellow colored ones) and my wife really didn't like the look (mostly a color thing). But she was very comfortable with the 'sleek/black look' of the Sport as it will share space with our very occasional guests.

DaveLeeNC
03-28-2013, 10:17 AM
Egg, that is a really ugly story. I don't know if I was lucky with mine or you were exceptionally unlucky. Have to agree that your story is basically too bad to be just back luck.

FWIW, I have somewhere between 400 and 500 hours on my Revmaster without an issue (all that I have done is to lube the leather pad thingey occasionally). I bought mine from across the country direct from Lemond - have no idea how I could have dealt with the problems you encountered.

dave

DaveLeeNC
08-28-2014, 08:34 PM
Just for completeness in case someone else is doing research on this and runs into this thread ....

I'm estimating somewhere between 400 and 500 hours on this bike (Revmaster Sport) without a problem until a few weeks ago. For a while now I thought that maybe I was feeling a hint of a 'hitch' through the pedals that I kind of ignored. It wasn't much. Then there came a 'louder than a hint' squeal that was interesting in that it went away completely when I pedaled out of the saddle. It didn't seem like that but I assumed that it was a saddle squeak.

Then the squeal both started showing up all the time and was too loud to stand. By then it was obvious that it was the Bottom Bracket (bearing that the cranks turn in). The Lemond website directed me to http://www.hoistfitness.com/ - apparently they now own service (or the product - not sure). I sent in inquiry and 'Manuel' quickly sent me a pdf with pretty detailed pictures of how to replace the main bearing.

I'm not all that mechanically inclined but I went ahead and ordered the new bearing, tools required to removed the cranks and bearing, and new belt and leather friction pad just on general principles. Other than lack of confidence in what I was doing, the only real problem that I had was getting the old bearing assembly out. I ended up buying a 3 foot long piece of steel that would fit over the end of my big, heavy duty adjustable wrench. That solved the problem.

I don't own a torque wrench so I just used my best judgment when putting things back together. All is quiet and smooth again. And for the record there was pretty much no sign of wear on the belt. This is the only problem that I have encountered in 3 years and 4-500 miles.

FWIW.

dave