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yumipon
12-29-2010, 05:56 PM
We have brand new keiser M3 bikes in our club. Students continue being caught up with resistance & distance. They talk about how hi they increased, and how far they went. I explain what those two numbers represent in my class, but they don't get it.

One of the students came to me today and explained what she did in other cycle class. The instructor told them to set very heavy gear, seated, and pull legs up instead of pushing down. According to this instructor, he wanted everybody to feel their quads activated. He also told everybody to spin at 110rpm.

This student also said to me that her back has been bothering her since.

Can anybody tell me what the instructor was trying to achieve with this ride? I could not explain to this student what his profile was for, and if her back problem is related to what they were told to do :confused:

Megale
12-29-2010, 06:37 PM
Can anybody tell me what the instructor was trying to achieve with this ride?

Man slaughter? :) really who knows?

I am still confused where there is sooo much resistance and yet they are still going over 100 RPM's. I hate it when coaches try and cue visualizations to the pedal stroke. Sometimes it gets a little ridiculous.
Mike

yumipon
12-30-2010, 05:52 PM
Mike,
This is one of the bad case of using new toy(display) without any specific purpose. Ever since we got M3 bikes in our club, I've notice some of the instructors concentrating on pedal at certain number of resistance regardless of individual's weight. I wanted to explain to this student what the purpose of this instructor's ride was, but I couldn't. I wonder if the instructor knew:D

Funhog
12-30-2010, 06:18 PM
this is also a case of an instructor not knowing diddlysquat about the body....OR about cycling (and by extension - indoor cycling).

Pull UP to active the quads?? :confused::confused::confused:

The hip flexors which flex the hip (i.e. pull up the leg) are a very small group of muscles. They are important to a powerful and smooth pedal stroke (despite some who argue otherwise, but suffice it to say that many qualified cycling coaches and biomechanists will state that they are). However, being the small size that they are, there is simply no way for them to pull up a lot of resistance. Their antagonists are the glutes, which are the most powerful muscles in the body - so trying to pull up the same amount of resistance that you are able to push down could put anyone into physical therapy. The psoas attach to the anterior side of the lower vertebrae of the spine; it's no wonder her back hurts her.

Megale
12-30-2010, 06:41 PM
this is also a case of an instructor not knowing diddlysquat about the body....OR about cycling (and by extension - indoor cycling).

Pull UP to active the quads?? :confused::confused::confused:

The hip flexors which flex the hip (i.e. pull up the leg) are a very small group of muscles. They are important to a powerful and smooth pedal stroke (despite some who argue otherwise, but suffice it to say that many qualified cycling coaches and biomechanists will state that they are). However, being the small size that they are, there is simply no way for them to pull up a lot of resistance. Their antagonists are the glutes, which are the most powerful muscles in the body - so trying to pull up the same amount of resistance that you are able to push down could put anyone into physical therapy. The psoas attach to the anterior side of the lower vertebrae of the spine; it's no wonder her back hurts her.

Really I can't think of any orientation that I have taken or given where this "mere fact" :D is not laid out anymore. Simply put, this could be a glaring example of a instructor that has shown that they have no orientation and are winging it. I have to think that if otherwise, its a blatant disregard for SICP's.
Mike

Cyclemonkey
12-30-2010, 08:25 PM
R... its a blatant disregard for SICP's.
Mike
What are

"SICPs".

thank you.

kelwend
12-30-2010, 08:31 PM
this is also a case of an instructor not knowing diddlysquat about the body....OR about cycling (and by extension - indoor cycling).

Pull UP to active the quads?? :confused::confused::confused:

The hip flexors which flex the hip (i.e. pull up the leg) are a very small group of muscles. They are important to a powerful and smooth pedal stroke (despite some who argue otherwise, but suffice it to say that many qualified cycling coaches and biomechanists will state that they are). However, being the small size that they are, there is simply no way for them to pull up a lot of resistance. Their antagonists are the glutes, which are the most powerful muscles in the body - so trying to pull up the same amount of resistance that you are able to push down could put anyone into physical therapy. The psoas attach to the anterior side of the lower vertebrae of the spine; it's no wonder her back hurts her.

check the bad posture of some instructor ... hyperlordose ...
I think that when we see that patern,we are in front of someone using more hip flexor than other muslce. They use theyr hip flexor to "stabilaze" the crazy RPM,I think ... ?

Megale
12-30-2010, 08:38 PM
What are

"SICPs".

thank you.

Safe Indoor Cycling Practices

Funhog
12-30-2010, 08:56 PM
Safe Indoor Cycling Practices

This is an "AMM"*








(Acronym Made up by Mike!) ;)

yumipon
12-31-2010, 06:57 AM
Thank you very much for your comments guys!

The instructor rides outside, and own a couple of bike shops!! Of course, he does not have to talk about Indoor cycle practice with his customers. If he did, he may not be able to keep his business. http://pedal-on.com/images/icons/icon13.gif

yumipon
12-31-2010, 07:18 AM
Oh, By the way, the same student who asked me about the ride she took with another instructor told me that her back has been bothering her since that class. Could that be related? :confused:

yumipon
12-31-2010, 08:27 AM
Sorry, Kelwend did mention about the back pain related to this heavy resistance and concentrating pulling upward could have caused her back pain. Isn't it sad that students follow what instructor tells them without knowing what could be doing to their body....:(

kelwend
12-31-2010, 11:58 AM
A big problem is that we use fix heavy flywheel. The patern is different, the way muscles work is different, when-how and how much each muscle work is different. There are more chance to hurt articulations and back on a fix bike.

Megale
01-01-2011, 02:12 PM
This is an "AMM"*








(Acronym Made up by Mike!) ;)
I've got a million of them :) But I think this one could catch on :cool:
Mike

Megale
01-01-2011, 02:14 PM
Oh, By the way, the same student who asked me about the ride she took with another instructor told me that her back has been bothering her since that class. Could that be related? :confused:
One note: Check fit up on that person.
Mike

Devante
10-18-2011, 05:54 AM
this is also a case of an instructor not knowing diddlysquat about the body....OR about cycling (and by extension - indoor cycling).

Pull UP to active the quads?? :confused::confused::confused:

The hip flexors which flex the hip (i.e. pull up the leg) are a very small group of muscles. They are important to a powerful and smooth pedal stroke (despite some who argue otherwise, but suffice it to say that many qualified cycling coaches and biomechanists will state that they are). However, being the small size that they are, there is simply no way for them to pull up a lot of resistance. Their antagonists are the glutes, which are the most powerful muscles in the body - so trying to pull up the same amount of resistance that you are able to push down could put anyone into physical therapy. The psoas attach to the anterior side of the lower vertebrae of the spine; it's no wonder her back hurts her.

Hmm in this scenario back can be hurt so go the physical therapist he might help u out but u have to be more patience while therapy sessions because it is the lengthy treatment...........

Riverside physical therapy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXE_isOLp5A)

darkromeo
11-05-2011, 03:03 PM
I often wonder where instructors come up with this stuff

Vivienne
11-08-2011, 09:02 AM
I often wonder where instructors come up with this stuff

Usually that old canard *Personal Experience*

If you want to understand why, here's a couple of books to start you off....

http://www.amazon.com/Extraordinary-Popular-Delusions-Madness-Crowds/dp/051788433X

http://www.amazon.com/People-Believe-Weird-Things-Pseudoscience/dp/0716733870

You'll be shaking your head in amazement before you're halfway through.


Vivienne

Kim Cavanaugh
11-08-2011, 09:15 AM
I don't feel that concentrating on pulling up with heavy resistance is a bad thing! It completes a smooth pedal stroke!

Vivienne
11-08-2011, 10:26 AM
I don't feel that concentrating on pulling up with heavy resistance is a bad thing! It completes a smooth pedal stroke!

Based on *Personal Experience* right?

Vivienne