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Thread: X Biking

  1. #12

    Talking xbike

    Good Job SpinDaddy! They are awesome huh? Where do you ride the xbikes? I tell them I better see the pain on their face or fake me out so I don't know that you are not working haha..this was for a xxx class.

    Glad you enjoy the xibke!

    Take care

  2. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by X-CAT View Post
    <<snip>>Hey I do not understand the mechanics of a bike in which you cannot stop at will or that makes me feel like I'm always riding a straight line or that (If I wanted) I could cheat the pedaling action by taking advantage of the momentum forces of the Flywheel.
    I wish I had the same momentum force on my Cannondale when I'm riding outdoors....



    Cheers,
    Assuming you do not have a mass equal to, or near to, zero - I suspect you and your Cannondale have more than a little momemtumm IRL. And in terms of mechanics of real bikes vs stationary - you can't tell me that a leaning ("turning") stationary bike in any real/useful way duplicates the feel of a leaning/turning moving bike. There's a little thing called centripetal force which keeps the centre of mass pointed straight through the vertical axis (not lumped off to one side). I mean, good luck with your gimmick. Why not? But pretending it is more like "real riding" is the biggest cliche in this industry. Everyone says it about every bike they're trying to sell. I've always thought that X-Bikes lumbar flexion with twisting under load sounded a bit ordinary in terms of general low back longevity. But I've been wrong many times...

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cafehead View Post
    Assuming you do not have a mass equal to, or near to, zero - I suspect you and your Cannondale have more than a little momemtumm IRL. And in terms of mechanics of real bikes vs stationary - you can't tell me that a leaning ("turning") stationary bike in any real/useful way duplicates the feel of a leaning/turning moving bike. There's a little thing called centripetal force which keeps the centre of mass pointed straight through the vertical axis (not lumped off to one side). I mean, good luck with your gimmick. Why not? But pretending it is more like "real riding" is the biggest cliche in this industry. Everyone says it about every bike they're trying to sell. I've always thought that X-Bikes lumbar flexion with twisting under load sounded a bit ordinary in terms of general low back longevity. But I've been wrong many times...
    You are right, there is momentum during the "foward motion of pedaling a real bicycle" (that's why you can coast and also maneuver while in downhill or descent action without having to pedal at all), You cannot compare it with the momentum generated thru the flywheel on a Stationary bike, which "helps" you with every revolution, where the weight of the flywheel turns the pedals, not your pedalling action.

    I guess that perhaps you might have not read the threads about X-Biking written before this, otherwise you would have realized that there are no side (leaning or as you say "lumping") movements while riding it. We take advantage of the X-Bar movement to mimick carving and also to generate the natural movement of the hadlebar that any person has to do when riding uphill.
    Or you are going to tell us also that it is impossible ?or that it is a movement that is just not done in real life?

    If you think so, I challenge you to go outdoors on any bicycle, choose a small hill (15 - 30 sec climb) any degree of slope you choose (the higher the slope the more you will need to manipulate your bike), and ride it. If you really did not have to manipulate the bike, side to side, by "pumping" the handlebar (like we all do) as we pedal uphill, then please educate us all as to how a bicycle must be ridden.

    I'm not saying that this is a better bike than others (indoor bikes), please remember that indoor cycles are just performance trainers. And most indoor bikes are used the same way because they are designed with similar specs. They are designed for pedaling with a fixed gear drive mechanism. Just like a track bike. Nothing wrong with that.

    Just that the X-Bike allows us to safely "train" not only the legs but the upper musculature as well (the same muscles we all use when we ride outdoors) engaging and strenghthening our "core" musculature, oh! and yes, the lower back is part of it (maybe we could get a little bit into biomechanics later on and educate us all as to how our muscles really work...)

    Do you know what a stable bridge is? Core Stabilizacion?
    Did you realize that riding with a rigid bar (handlebar) generates a negative torque on the lower spine? that's why many, wrongly swing their bodies (note: lateral movement) as they ride on an Indoor bike, trying to mimik the "feel" that they experience on their outdoor bike.

    I love my gimmick!
    It has improved 100% my outdoor riding skills.
    My upper body strenght and core conditioning, not to mention my cardiovascular endurance has improved dramatically since I use my X-Bike.

    But as I wrote before, when we ride the X-Bike for training purposes the "spin switch has to be turned OFF" other wise, still thinking inside the box, it just wouldn't make any sence, specially for anyone that has never tried it under the supervision of a Certified X-Biking Professional.

    Cheers.

  4. #15

    Default

    Big post. Rambles a bit. Employs sarcasm, condescension and unsupported data. What on earth does "negative torque on the lower spine" mean? Negative torque (torque loss) is usually a bad thing in power generation. But in a back? Sounds good!

    I'm going to let this one go through to the keeper. Drafted a 30 minute reply which disappeared on submit. but I'd like to come back to these ideas.

    Core stability on bikes - useful or furphy?
    Lateral bike movement - useful or over-rated in upper body training?

    Mate. Love your gimmmick all you want but don't fall in love with the claptrap sales doublespeak without a decent critical analysis. Personally, when I hear the words core strength around bikes my BS antennae start to buzz.

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cafehead View Post
    Big post. Rambles a bit. Employs sarcasm, condescension and unsupported data. What on earth does "negative torque on the lower spine" mean? Negative torque (torque loss) is usually a bad thing in power generation. But in a back? Sounds good!

    I'm going to let this one go through to the keeper. Drafted a 30 minute reply which disappeared on submit. but I'd like to come back to these ideas.

    Core stability on bikes - useful or furphy?
    Lateral bike movement - useful or over-rated in upper body training?

    Mate. Love your gimmmick all you want but don't fall in love with the claptrap sales doublespeak without a decent critical analysis. Personally, when I hear the words core strength around bikes my BS antennae start to buzz.
    I want to thank you for your reply,
    this is why we have forums like this, to openly and intelligently discuss topics so that we all can learn new and old ideas, methods and why not, different types of training and equipment as well.

    As a Matter of fact, I believe that it would be a great idea to discuss important topics about training (our kind of training) on an Indoor cycle. This way we'll all discover new ideas and reinforce old ideas as well.

    My intention was not to sound sarcastic, by all means. I am an educator and a fitness professional, I also use the big words such as core stability, core strength, and negative torque, because they are part of what we do (riding a bike) I can write in english (or spanish) if I must, just like I have to explain in plain words when I am teaching an X-Biking class and someone does not follow our cycling lingo, such as gear, crank or RPM.

    I am not following a cheap "claptrap sales doublespeak", don't need to do that when I know what I am talking about.
    However, I don't resort to bashing or badmouthing any other product or anyone.

    There are certain qualities (explained in other threads before) that make the X-Bike different and quite challenging compared to any spin type bike. Once again....the X-Bike is not a spin bike...
    The frame does not move, the rider does not lean, it has a special handlebar mechanism that does allow you to "engage your core musculature" thus, strengthening your core-abdominal muscles, it also helps you "enhance your Propioceptive skills" (ever heard of propioceptors ?) other qualities as well.

    Anyways, sometimes people seem to forget that Indoor cycles are just
    performance trainers, That's it! this one happens to help us engage more efficiently other muscles as well.....


    My Team mates are mostly roadies, who also train and or teach on indoor bikes such as spinners, cycleops bikes and X-Bikes, some are tri-athletes, others just ride for fun, but the important fact here is that we all respect and share our ideas about Indoor/outdoor training, nutrition, biomechanics, hell....even about beer. We also interact as profesionals. I don't spin nor do I ride road every week as my Team mates do. But we all meet regularly once or twice a Month and train on my X-Bikes and analize our OFF Road riding techniques (remember we are talking performance training here) then we apply those as we ride outdoors with much success. Most riders do not realize how important it is to train your core muscles and arms to ride a bike. And I am not going to get into the fitness benefits of utilizing a CORE TRAINING TOOL as the source of indoor performance training.

    Cheers.

  6. #17

    Default

    OK so you have twice as many languages available as me (at least). I'll accept at face value that you're not trying to sound sarcastic but you might want to accept that (from at least my point of view) there does still seem to be a little attitude in tone. Could be just me...

    If you'd like to make the case for core stability on a bike, I'd be fascinated... please try to include evidence and references if they're handy. In particular anything which suggests core stability improves economy or efficiency in terms of average power. That's a fair test, right? Cause this reminds me of the people that beat on about pedal stroke drills like they're going to make a big difference...

    Anyway - I gotta go get on a plane and go teach a cycling instructor workshop near the world's finest beach. So I'll be away a few days from the net. *choke* But don't fret for me - I'll get by...
    Last edited by cafehead; 12-13-2007 at 06:43 PM.

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cafehead View Post

    If you'd like to make the case for core stability on a bike, I'd be fascinated... please try to include evidence and references if they're handy. In particular anything which suggests core stability improves economy or efficiency in terms of average power. That's a fair test, right? Cause this reminds me of the people that beat on about pedal stroke drills like they're going to make a big difference...

    I'd be interested in this, as well.... and it's never been answered.
    Kala
    Star 2 Spinning Instructor

  8. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by X-CAT View Post
    it just wouldn't make any sence, specially for anyone that has never tried it under the supervision of a Certified X-Biking Professional.

    Cheers.
    I wish I could contact mine!

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rick316 View Post
    I wish I could contact mine!
    I wish I could find a certification. Ha.



    Also, Rick- taught my first class last night, back again tonight. I think I may slowly get the hang of it!
    Kala
    Star 2 Spinning Instructor

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by X-CAT View Post
    this is why we have forums like this, to openly and intelligently discuss topics so that we all can learn new and old ideas
    I have learned a lot on these forums, and appreciate the breadth of opinions and depth of knowledge. Thank-you all for participating!

    I wanted to add my 2cents regarding the Trixter X-bikes from a different perspective. I'm a newbie.

    I have ONLY ever used a TRIXTER bike! I don't ride outdoors, and never rode other indoor bikes.

    I started spinning classes about a year ago, and we have the Trixters at my gym. I struggled the first couple of times because I had poor form and I was out of shape, but since then I have become a regular.

    At my gym, out of the 10 classes per week, there are maybe only two classes that are labeled X-biking and where the instructor leads us to use our upper bodies. It took me a while to get the hang of the handlebar exercises--the instructor doesn't do very much explaining. But I finally got the hang of it.

    But of course, in the other classes we can all individually adjust our handlebars and do what we want. Personally I like to leave it loose and use the lateral motion when it feels natural.

    I've brought friends to the class who do NOT like the freewheel, or haven't given it time to get used to it. My guess is you need at least 2 to 3 sessions on the X-bike to "get it" if you've ever ridden other bikes. Once is not enough to knock it!

    So, this is my first post, and I just wanted to share my opinion of the Trixter. Even though I've got nothing to compare it to!!

  11. Default X Bike

    001cy2-300x300
    Sounds interesting!

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