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Traveler
09-24-2007, 04:25 PM
The Truth About Food.

Kind of a simplistic book by nature but has a lot of helpful advice. One thing that I liked a lot was the mind/body connection in long distance events. The author talks about a study that found that in a 10K race, a runner had a signfigantly easier time in the first 3 miles then a runner running a 5K race. The mind tells the body that because there is so much longer to go, pain receptors are blocked and adreneline surges more. But the last 1K of the race is toughest on both runners because the end is so near.

Seems simplistic in its reasoning but could be a good way to motivate people in class.

billpierce
09-24-2007, 05:50 PM
The Truth About Food.

Kind of a simplistic book by nature but has a lot of helpful advice. One thing that I liked a lot was the mind/body connection in long distance events. The author talks about a study that found that in a 10K race, a runner had a signfigantly easier time in the first 3 miles then a runner running a 5K race. The mind tells the body that because there is so much longer to go, pain receptors are blocked and adreneline surges more. But the last 1K of the race is toughest on both runners because the end is so near.

Seems simplistic in its reasoning but could be a good way to motivate people in class.

Dude -

I have no doubt that this book offers good advice on nutrition, but the advice on running isn't accurate. The author's math is incorrect. After the first 3 miles of a 5K, there is only .1 mile left, not 1K. Plus, the reason that the first 3 miles of a 5K is tougher than the first 3 miles of a 10K is because your pace is much faster. A runner's 10K time will be more than 2 x their 5K time. 5Ks are usually run above threshold, while 10Ks are usually done at or slightly below AT. I hate running 5Ks because they are so intense. Using the author's logic, my marathon time should be twice my half marathon time, which has never happened.

Traveler
09-25-2007, 08:49 AM
Dude -

I have no doubt that this book offers good advice on nutrition, but the advice on running isn't accurate. The author's math is incorrect. After the first 3 miles of a 5K, there is only .1 mile left, not 1K. Plus, the reason that the first 3 miles of a 5K is tougher than the first 3 miles of a 10K is because your pace is much faster. A runner's 10K time will be more than 2 x their 5K time. 5Ks are usually run above threshold, while 10Ks are usually done at or slightly below AT. I hate running 5Ks because they are so intense. Using the author's logic, my marathon time should be twice my half marathon time, which has never happened.

Yeah I may have gotten the math slightly wrong as I don't run. But I do completly believe that the theory holds.