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LoveMyPitBull
10-06-2006, 02:41 PM
At the very peak of my complete and utter disgust with my weight, I decided to finally utilize some of the classes at my Bally. Everytime I ran around the track, I saw a little room with all these cool bikes and remembered the salesmans words (who sold me my 3 year membership to the gym) echoing in my brain "you can burn up to 1000 calories in an hour, black lights, techno, its awesome!" So, I mustered up all my courage, and attended my first class last night.
I must admit, it was nothing like I had expected. I really thought I was going to go out of there completly sweat soaked. I also was expecting more motivation.
I wasn't expecting my crotch and my butt to hurt so bad, though! Nor was I expecting to have to stand up most of the time! I guess there are "levels" and he kept having them adjust the resistance, but with standing, I could barely stay at level 2, if I moved it to level 3, I would have to sit down. I never felt out of breath, but my legs sure were burning! I didn't want to sit, because it was hurting my butt! I did get a bit of sweat, but not the buckets I was hoping for.
The instructor put on songs and sort of sang along, but he didn't mention a lot about hills or riding or anything, sometimes he would say "who wants to get to the top of this hill?" or whatever..but most of the time was acting silly with the songs.
I want to go back tomorrow morning, but I'm afraid my butt will be even more sore.
How many classes do I take a week to lose weight? Am I doing anything wrong? Any suggestions?

megale3
10-06-2006, 03:31 PM
Hi LMPB,
I am a MT for the Reaction Cycling Program and first off lets explain our Zones -For training effect we work in easy to understand intensities. Our cues should be considered so that a newer persons ability to judge their intensity does not required anything more than a well defined intuitive meaning- because most people don't own a HRM or have exercise history to know where they will be able to maintain a productive pace given that the instructor has a goal or a point to the class. That being said what you mentioned as "levels" I am assuming means these "Zones" that are called out text book as

Zone 1 = Easy HR = 50 to 65% MHR
Zone 2 = Challenged but comfortable HR = 65 to 75% MHR (good aerobic pace)
Zone 3 = challenging and uncomfortable HR = 75 to 85% MHR (Race Pace)
Zone 4 = Breathless HR = 85 to 90% MHR (need to quit intensity to allow for recovery back to aerobic pace)

If you were new to the class instructor should have said to you to take it easy for a few (up to 6) classes not going past Z2 until you feel like you can challenge you comfort of breathing comfortably (not just sweating which could be done in the sauna) Plus allowing you to acclimate to the bike and see how it works with resistance- cadence- comfort and stability. On top of all that you should know three things at all times while you are riding.
One what the goal is (big or small picture)
Two how long it will take
And three what it should feel like.
So a cue like “We are going to ride this Hill seated for the next three minutes in Zone 3” should be heard or at least one like it.
If the instructor didn't cue these things ASK!! Ask them for a “triple link” and when they look at you like “woow ok dude”- listen for the next set of cues to follow they should be done methodical and with enough time to get you to the next goal allowing you to get into the prescribe intensity to get the job done.
Meg

raptor
10-06-2006, 08:03 PM
Your butt will be sore for a while. Get back on the bike as soon as you can talk yourself into it. The discomfort should start going away after 3-4 rides or a couple weeks, but you might be tender. When you do a lot more cycling than you're used to, you'll feel it again. It's just adapting. I don't even feel the saddle during the typical 60-minute class now, but if I go for a three-hour road ride...

Get cycling shorts as soon as you decide you'll keep cycling - that could be "now." Wear them under regular shorts if you must, but don't wear anything under them.

Once you get the feel of the bike and the workout, you'll easily be able to feel it in breathing and heart rate. :)

Losing weight depends on your diet as much as exercise. If that is your goal, use cycling as just one of many forms of exercise. I suggest not focusing on the scale but instead on the mirror and how you feel. Your weight will go up and down, but you WILL get leaner/slimmer and stronger/healthier. And that's what really counts, isn't it?

And remember, these changes you're making will do you no good unless they stick.

Lynn

snelson
10-06-2006, 10:55 PM
You know spinning is a process and a journey; same with weight. I think we are too anxious to get through things. Like we want to go through it fast and be done. Try to enjoy spinning. It can take you to new places. Yes, the butt will stop hurting one day. Keep at it. Try some different instructors as well. Stick with it, you'll be amazed. :)

megale3
10-09-2006, 11:21 AM
I had an orientation this weekend and the class was full of wide eyed , awesome and talented individuals. I always have a working lunch where we come back and eat and have a instructor lead discussions on injury prevention, management and music. At this point a lot of the discussions turned to ways of dealing with so many of the problems from just trying the seat out for the first time and new people's unknowing drudgery of the saddle. We concluded that the best thing for a coach to do is to warn a new individuals that the seat may be harsh your first time out and that it gets better with subsequent follow ups to the class. That way they will not be surprised that the seat feels like a knotted branch and not to worry "you will get use to it. We also made recogmendations as to sit or stand when you felt the need. Also the use of the resistance knob to fine tune a "float" above the bottom bracket as a way of Jogging it out untill they are ready to go again errr at least their posterior :D Hope this helps I thought of you while I had this disscussion.
Meg
almost forgot have a seat pad handy also for those that are very sinsitive.

Ernestine
10-10-2006, 10:33 AM
LoveMyPitbull: As an instructor, whenever someone new comes into my class I try to take them aside and make sure bike positioning is correct--so make sure you are set up on the bike correctly first of all. I also get a baseline assessment from people--"what is your current fitness level?" "Do you run, do elliptical or do some form of aerobic exercise?" I then explain about the resistance and have them get the feel for the bike. I keep a close eye on them during class--coach off the bike if I see a technique need s to be enhanced.
I have great response from newcomers--they feel special and it really helps them get a good introduction.
As for the weight loss, that is up to you and how you wish to do it. I have one woman who is now at 20 lbs weight lost who has basically been practicing "portion control" as she calls it. Upping her fruits and veggies and cutting down on all the rest. Make sure you do something you can live with long term as this is a healthy change for life.

Enjoy spinning--it is addictive--it is exactly how I got into it and am now an instructor. Oh--get the shorts---Ernestine:D

SpnLdy8
10-11-2006, 10:31 PM
Hi there .. fellow Reaction Cycling Coach from midwest city here ----

You are going to find some instructors that are motivating
and teach the classes properly. You are going to find that some instructor's are off in "their own world" doing what they want to do.
Since Bally's went to Reaction Cycling the amount of idiotic instructors has slimmed down , but in my AREA there are still some "rebels" doing one count jumps , too slow cadences , and the thing I find the most annoying STRETCHING on the BIKE. ( grabbing the handlebars and pushing your butt back .. elongating the back )
In the summer I often rode my bike to the gym and was allowed to keep it in the cycling room while I taught my classes. I demonstrated SEVERAL times that you don't stretch on your bike outside .. so DON'T DO IT IN HERE !! You can't possible stand up properly and do you really want to mess up the cranks on the bike ???

I hope that you do find a motivating instructor that does TEACH the PROGRAM properly and you really enjoy your experience :)
Keep the Faith ..play with the resistance knob .. listen to your body .. push it if it needs to be pushed .. back off if it feels to overwhelming -
I like that Reaction is based on zones. It makes alot of sense !!!


I wan't to slap some of the salespeople silly when they give potential members the "you will burn 1000 calories an hour line".
I have a Polar Heart Rate Monitor and depending on how hard I work I average 400-600 a class and I teach about 50 minutes from warm up to workout to cool down and stretch. Sometimes I teach a bit off the bike and sometimes I do not depending on who is in class that day.
Most of my students who have Polar Monitors average about 400-600 calories in this time amount also.

Remember --- it is not the destination that holds the reward .. it is the journey you take to get to the destination that truly holds the reward !!!
I have been teaching for 7 years and I am a proud plus sized but very fit instructor .. so if you want to just cycle to lose weight .. you might be disappointed ..do it because your heart will be healthy , your body will get stronger , and so will your mind !!!

Becky

raptor
10-11-2006, 11:08 PM
In the summer I often rode my bike to the gym and was allowed to keep it in the cycling room while I taught my classes. I demonstrated SEVERAL times that you don't stretch on your bike outside .. so DON'T DO IT IN HERE !! You can't possible stand up properly and do you really want to mess up the cranks on the bike ???


Just a nit: If you watch enough bike racing, you'll see riders doing various stretches on the bike. I used to do the butt-off-the-back stretch on my mountain bike, but that was before I got my core and upper body stretched and properly toned.

Lynn

JoyofSpin
10-12-2006, 04:00 AM
LMPB - the aches and pains for the most part (LOL) go away. Your butt and crotch will get used to the saddle after a few rides but if they don't there is always the option of padded shorts or a gel seat which fits over the saddle of the bike. As far as the class and instruction what I like to say to new riders is there are many instructors who teach these classes. Find the ones who motivate you with music that you can deal with and keep taking those classes. Every instructor has their own teaching style so seek out the one who matches your riding style. Enjoy the ride. Its a great one! - Joy

Jennifer
10-12-2006, 07:13 AM
Just wanted to add that the fat-burning zone is not the "kill yourself, sweat buckets" zone, so you're probably doing more than you realize.

SpnLdy8
10-13-2006, 07:04 PM
When I went through my re-cert classes and when I did my initial Reaction Training I was told no stretching on the bike .. do all your stretches off the bike . In the manual , there are ALL pictures of people stretching off the bike.
I was told --- You don't do it on the road and you don't want to mess up the cranks on the bikes ?
Let me know .. I STILL SEE people stretching on the bike and if I am in the wrong with this I want to know.

Becky

megale3
10-13-2006, 07:37 PM
When I went through my re-cert classes and when I did my initial Reaction Training I was told no stretching on the bike .. do all your stretches off the bike . In the manual , there are ALL pictures of people stretching off the bike.
I was told --- You don't do it on the road and you don't want to mess up the cranks on the bikes ?
Let me know .. I STILL SEE people stretching on the bike and if I am in the wrong with this I want to know.

Becky

Hi Becky
Rule is no stretching muscles of the lower body on the bikes things like IT bands, Hamstrings, Calves, Glutes, and Quads should all be stretched on the floor. It’s a Bally’s safety rule mostly and has been from the first week that they got indoor cycling although putting a foot on the top tube to stretch hamstrings is fine but putting the foot above the iliac crest is a tripping hazard and shouldn't be practiced. Placing feet on handlebars is kind of gross cause people put there hands there and there is no telling what you walked through :eek:
Meg

SpnLdy8
10-16-2006, 12:13 AM
so when people grab the handlebars and push their butts back .. with the back flatttened ... and pushing on the cranks with their legs is wrong ..
(i hope you know what i am talking about !!!)

there are several instructors in my area that are practicing this
and i layed the smack down on my group with this ...

thanks for clarifying

megale3
10-16-2006, 11:02 AM
Right as a safety concern yes you could come uncleted and or uncaged and fall backward-just common science on this. Old pedals are so shakey and old cletes are even more shakey. I was demonstraighting a push back CI movement in a class once and came un cleted it was enough for everyone to go "yep that should not be done". :D
Meg

SpnLdy8
10-16-2006, 11:21 PM
thanks Megale for the clarification and the visual ..ugh .. not good!

raptor
10-17-2006, 01:40 AM
I took a master class Sunday (one of NINE since Friday night - yep, I'm just a leetle sore:)). The ventilation was poor, and the floor nicely polished. I soaked my shorts (um, with sweat) in both rides I did.

We did the calf stretch on the bike because the trainer was concerned about the slippery floor.

Lynn

megale3
10-17-2006, 11:12 AM
Personally I don't think that you would do anything that was harsh.
Lynn were you still cleted to the pedals? The pads on the back of the frame are to place our foot high on the bar with the heel on the floor for the Gastrocs. While holding the bike for support we pull our selves toward the seat with a slight bend to the knee . Then to hit the solius we bend the knee even more and draw ourselves inward while still grasping the bike. Technically this is using the bike to stretch but only while standing on the floor.
Meg

megale3
10-17-2006, 11:15 AM
thanks Megale for the clarification and the visual ..ugh .. not good!

I know but it really got the point across:)

SpnLdy8
10-17-2006, 10:09 PM
I was told today by one of my regulars that a new instructor has been teaching them to stretch on the bike. She told me that she doesn't do it and gets off the bike. When she does this , the new instructor looks at her very funny. I told her not to sweat it as I got clarification from you a BALLY MASTER TRAINER that it isn't supposed to be done like that.
BTW .. where are you a Bally Master Trainer ???
I sure wish you were one in Chi-town !!!


AND can I copy what you wrote to me to my coordinator .
I feel she needs to know .
I already told this instructor not to stretch on the bike when she asked me for some advice two weeks ago .. I guess she didn't listen !!

Becky

raptor
10-18-2006, 12:10 AM
Personally I don't think that you would do anything that was harsh.
Lynn were you still cleted to the pedals? The pads on the back of the frame are to place our foot high on the bar with the heel on the floor for the Gastrocs. While holding the bike for support we pull our selves toward the seat with a slight bend to the knee . Then to hit the solius we bend the knee even more and draw ourselves inward while still grasping the bike. Technically this is using the bike to stretch but only while standing on the floor.
Meg

I don't know what I was thinking when I signed up. I was channeling a shop-aholic. Overall, it was about as difficult as a challenging backpacking trip, or a 200-mile ride with barely sufficient conditioning. Except for a slightly pulled hamstring, I'm almost completely recovered now (Tuesday night). Teaching a couple classes has helped. Yes, I took it easy.

I am never cleated in, since my cleats don't match the pedals. I just did my usual stretch off the bike as you describe, before the instructor explained her reasoning.

Lynn

LoveMyPitBull
10-18-2006, 12:35 PM
Thank you all for the replies (although most of which I have no idea what they are about!)
I'm in crappy, crappy Buffalo, so I haven't been on the computer due to power loss the past 6 days! (YIKES!)

Anyway, I have now been to 4 Reaction Cycling Classes. Only 1 of them was with a different instructor. I must admit so far, I like the original instructor better, even though he does sing along to Madonna and he sings the "hey baby hey baby" song! The woman was just too quiet, didn't wear her microphone, and didn't have us standing as long as the guy does.
I am glad to say I no longer experience pain in my nether region!!! My quads were MUCH more sore after the first class, now I don't feel any pain, so does that mean I need to increase the resistance?

I am extremely shy, so I'm afraid to ask for help setting up my bike. The first class, the instructor did give me a little help, and I am comfortable now with knowing what my legs need to look like, but I need to know if its normal for my butt to hit the seat when I'm standing, or do I need to push the seat back further? Also, yesterday, my bike was sort of clunking, it wasn't going smooth like it usually does, (i have been using different bikes) and the resistance didn't seem to be bothering me much.

I am also doing Weight Watchers, and have lost 11 lbs in a little over a month. (I am 22 year old female, I now weigh 139) I did read somewhere that if you take 3-4 reaction cycling classes per week that you don't have to do any other cardio. I usually do 3-4 weeks of strength training plus I've been trying to make at least 2 RC classes a week. (I also do ellipitcal and treadmill on my non-RC days) so I definatly have a plan.

Thanks all for your help with this. I have been telling everyone about the RC classes, and I just can't seem to get enough!

megale3
10-18-2006, 01:10 PM
Glad you are on line again. As far as your set up goes- take the time and get with the instructor to get it nailed down its very important for Comfort, Performance and injury prevention. I really can't help you from here as it’s a very visual thing for the person setting up the individual and has a lot to do with communicating back and forth about the comfort of that individual while being set up. I am also glad you are liking RC resistance will be about you and the need to be in a certain intensity while doing a specific design in class some bikes as you have found are different too- so learning the resistance charactoristics of that bike prior to class is a plus. As far as the amount of time that you do cardio vascular training- doing intensity at a mildly vigorous level for 40 minutes @ 4 times a week will get you gains as most accredited certifications in physical fitness will say. I would mix it up personally so I don't get burned out on any one thing. Have a great ride and don't for get to stretch.
Meg

raptor
10-19-2006, 12:27 AM
Thank you all for the replies (although most of which I have no idea what they are about!)
I'm in crappy, crappy Buffalo, so I haven't been on the computer due to power loss the past 6 days! (YIKES!)

Anyway, I have now been to 4 Reaction Cycling Classes. Only 1 of them was with a different instructor. I must admit so far, I like the original instructor better, even though he does sing along to Madonna and he sings the "hey baby hey baby" song! The woman was just too quiet, didn't wear her microphone, and didn't have us standing as long as the guy does.

A guy singing along to Madonna... Shudder!!! :)


I am glad to say I no longer experience pain in my nether region!!! My quads were MUCH more sore after the first class, now I don't feel any pain, so does that mean I need to increase the resistance?

It's called "specific adaptation to imposed demands." You've gotten stronger. Congratulations! Now, work on making those quads sore again to get even stronger. (No rush, just keep graduallly pushing yourself.)


I am extremely shy, so I'm afraid to ask for help setting up my bike. The first class, the instructor did give me a little help, and I am comfortable now with knowing what my legs need to look like, but I need to know if its normal for my butt to hit the seat when I'm standing, or do I need to push the seat back further? Also, yesterday, my bike was sort of clunking, it wasn't going smooth like it usually does, (i have been using different bikes) and the resistance didn't seem to be bothering me much.

Most of the time in a good standing position, your butt tells you where the saddle is. When doing a standing sprint, you tend to lean forward more. Your saddle fore/aft position depends on where your knee is with the pedals horizontal when sitting, not where your butt is when standing. As Meg says, your bike set-up is important, so have the instructor check you out. I always say that as long as nothing is hurting, you're okay, but the wrong set-up can hurt something over time and you don't know where it came from.

Riding a bike the right way does not hurt. Period.

I end every class asking for problem reports about the bikes, so let your instructor know about the clunking so it gets fixed.


I am also doing Weight Watchers, and have lost 11 lbs in a little over a month. (I am 22 year old female, I now weigh 139) I did read somewhere that if you take 3-4 reaction cycling classes per week that you don't have to do any other cardio. I usually do 3-4 weeks of strength training plus I've been trying to make at least 2 RC classes a week. (I also do ellipitcal and treadmill on my non-RC days) so I definatly have a plan.

Thanks all for your help with this. I have been telling everyone about the RC classes, and I just can't seem to get enough!

Great! If you ride a bike a lot, you... get good at riding a bike. if that's your goal, keep riding a bike a lot. If your goal is something else (like losing weight), keep changing your workouts from time to time. As soon as something starts feeling "easy," swap it out, or do it harder or longer. They're called "work" outs for a reason.

Lynn