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View Full Version : It's like my first class all over again.



Patrick
04-12-2006, 02:49 PM
Just got a call from my group fitness director who is also an amazing yoga instructor in need of a sub for her Power Yoga class. Never taught yoga, I have attended the class several times, and I've been wanting to give it a try. I am, however, way out of my element here. We shall see; I'm really nervous (all over again!!!) The class is at 6:45. I'll let you know how it goes. It is, after all, only an hour of my life....

Patrick

MattF
04-12-2006, 02:57 PM
Yoga...gulp...something I definitely want to do more of. I'm sure you'll do great! Let us know how it goes!! Good luck!! :) Matt

Pink
04-12-2006, 05:37 PM
Obviously, your director has full faith in your ability to sub the class. Go get 'em.

dgkilleen
04-12-2006, 08:09 PM
Good luck Patrick!!

I imagine you are nervous which is justified! But you know you can do it!! Let us all know how it goes...;)

Patrick
04-12-2006, 09:27 PM
Well, I haven't much time as my self-imposed bedtime approaches very soon, but I'd like to say the class went very well. A good friend and fellow instructor stayed for the class and was very impressed.

"I didn't know you knew anything about yoga, I mean I didn't know you had studied it or anything, but your terminology's good and it was a tough class."

Another faithful patron of the class said, "That was a really good class."

And a woman who had taken my Spinning class a few times asked, "So do you teach yoga too? It was a really good class." Of course I said no, and she seemed dissapointed. :D Maybe I'll be teaching yoga after all.

Well, in order to prepare I put together a routine, but that went for the most part out the window, since it tends to be in bad taste to cue a yoga class while reading off a piece of paper.

In any case, it went very well, and I feel accomplished to have broadened my horizons.

Patrick

raptor
04-12-2006, 09:49 PM
Whoa, color me somewhat stunned. Not that you're not good, Patrick, but it was yoga.

I grew up learning about yoga, and how yogis practice it as a lifestyle, never get good at it in their opinion, etc. Then I hear about all the massive hours required by some programs, take a few classes, figure out some of the positions, come away still thinking it's a very very deep format. I've done well over a dozen classes and still couldn't tell you what proper form is, because sometimes it seems the focus of a position is your left big toe.

It's very intimidating, and that's not something I say much. Good on ya for pulling it off!

Lynn

Pink
04-13-2006, 04:30 AM
Wonderful.

Are we going to lose you to some yoga board?

Patrick
04-13-2006, 06:51 AM
No worries, Pink. I'm not going anywhere. While I fully believe in the mental and physical benefits of the asanas themselves, and the benefits of practicing while listening to the breath, when they go so far as to the pratyahara (withdrawal of senses), things get a bit bohemian for my liking. I mean, far be it from me to dictate what works for others; different strokes for different folks. I, however, just don't quite jive with all the 8 limbs of yoga.

Patrick

PS I need stimulation, not a narcoleptic. I believe a yoga board might induce a little bit too much calm and peace... all the way to the pillow.

Pink
04-13-2006, 12:09 PM
lol, Patrick. I'm a yoga-nightmare. I've taken a few classes and have actually been told that I'm really good at it, but the whole time I'm thinking, "This would be OK if it started to move a little faster."

Yup, definitely NOT yoga material...

kszspin
04-13-2006, 12:38 PM
No worries, Pink. I'm not going anywhere. While I fully believe in the mental and physical benefits of the asanas themselves, and the benefits of practicing while listening to the breath, when they go so far as to the pratyahara (withdrawal of senses), things get a bit bohemian for my liking. I mean, far be it from me to dictate what works for others; different strokes for different folks. I, however, just don't quite jive with all the 8 limbs of yoga.

Patrick

PS I need stimulation, not a narcoleptic. I believe a yoga board might induce a little bit too much calm and peace... all the way to the pillow.

I agree Patrick, I love what the PHYSICAL part of yoga does for me and I tend to teach the poses (I incorporate yoga-ish stretches/movements in other classes I teach) with the emphasis on breathing, relaxing into stretches and the like. But I will not take it away from the physical present, I am not comfortable in that belief system. So I suppose I don't really do "yoga" if you look at that. I use my own names for poses or just cue them into position.
I am so glad that you were given that opportunity from your director (she is wise ;) ), and you rocked the class! Feels good don't it?:)
BTW Patrick, stop using those big words like 'narcoleptic' :D , I'm beginning to feel stooopid!

Pink...you sound like that girl on that commercial where she is trying desperately to get her leg behind her over her head :p .

spinguru
04-13-2006, 01:12 PM
At the risk of being a killjoy, am I the only one who sees a problem with teaching a yoga class (or any other class for that matter) without being properly certified to do so? With all due respect to Patrick, who is amazingly mature for his age, and has so much to offer, I cannot agree that taking a few classes qualifies you to teach a yoga class.

I have been certified to teach yoga for several years. It's probably the most rigorous certification process I have ever gone through and requires ongoing continuing education. It's very easy for someone to hurt themselves if they don't know what they are doing, and if that happens in a class with an uncertified teacher, well, the rest is history. It's also very easy for someone to think they understand the correct form for various asanas and totally misunderstand the nuances involved and to be totally unaware of the red flags to look for in the students, thus resulting in someone either doing the pose incorrectly and possibly hurting themselves, if not immediately, then by continually doing something incorrectly over time.

Whether or not you subscribe to the yoga philosophy, correct form and alignment is crucial in yoga, as is an understanding of anatomy and the variables that can occur from one person's anatomy to another's.

Just my $02 and no disrespect intended -- just concern.

alexkaboom
04-13-2006, 01:47 PM
I agree with Spinguru but to Patrick's credit, I don't believe he intends to do this on a regular basis, for what I understand, he was trying to lend a hand in subbing the class.

In yoga, as with any other class proper certification is required in my book.

Good job on stepping up to the plate Patrick, now get back on that bike... :D

Alex

Pink
04-13-2006, 02:23 PM
I thought the same thing...

kszspin
04-13-2006, 02:24 PM
Whether or not you subscribe to the yoga philosophy, correct form and alignment is crucial in yoga, as is an understanding of anatomy and the variables that can occur from one person's anatomy to another's.

Just my $02 and no disrespect intended -- just concern.

spinguru...I completely agree with you that if you are to teach a 'Yoga' class that you should be certified in that discipline and stay current. Since I choose not to subscribe to a yoga philosophy I will not go through a yoga cert nor will I teach a yoga class. I will however take the movements that come from yoga and blend them with other traditional stretching and use them in cooldowns for other classes, as well as sometimes at the end of a spinning class. I have had a group certification for many years and I'm cognizant of form and safety in the stretches I lead.
I appreciate your concern and value your expertise in this area. :)

MattF
04-13-2006, 03:04 PM
Yep, I ditto spinguru too... glad the class went well Patrick :) It's good to expand your instruction (or at least get a good background of another popular class) :) Matt

bikerchick2
04-13-2006, 06:49 PM
Good job Patrick. I am sure if anyone could step up to the plate in a pinch it would be you.:D
I also understand the feelings someone may have of you teaching Yoga without a certificate. They spend 200 hours and $3000 big ones to get their certificate. If you enjoy Yoga and are that good at it, you might consider getting certified. It is a great compliment to indoor cycling.
I am thinking of getting Yoga certified. Hey...the pay is much higher than indoor.;)
I also use a lot of the stretches after cycling.
:p

Patrick
04-13-2006, 08:24 PM
I totally understand where you are coming from, Spinguru. Not only would I not feel comfortable teaching a discipline I neither commonly practice nor in which do I hold a certification, but the powers that be in my facilty would not have it either; I much appreciate their adamancy for certifications. Too, while it costs me more money, they are intolerant of certifying bodies of ill-repute, and I totally support it.

So no worries. I will not be teaching yoga even mildly often, if I do at all; and if I do, it will be a situation much akin to the circumstances herein. Not to say I wouldn't like to get the cert one day....

Patrick

spinguru
04-14-2006, 09:13 AM
Patrick:

Yoga is a wonderful tool for physical and mental growth. I hope you do decide to pursue your certification.

In the interim, I did want to tell you that your posts always impress me with your maturity and intelligence.

Good luck to you as you grow as a coach and person -- I can tell you will have much to offer in your lifetime.

Spinguru

Paul S.
04-17-2006, 07:43 PM
It happens that today is the second anniversary of my Spinning Orientation. I now regularly teach 3 cycle classes per week. I was a regular Spinning participant for over 3 years before deciding to become an instructor. I started taking yoga classes regularly another year before that, and have been doing so ever since. If my director asked me to be a substitute yoga instructor even once, as Patrick's did, I would have to refuse politely. I realize now how much more there is to being an instructor than being even the most enthusiastic, knowledgeable participant. I'm happy that Patrick's director gave him a chance to sub yoga, that the class went well, that he is thinking of becoming certified in yoga, and I don't mean to criticize either of them - just saying what I would have done in the situation.

To think about it another way, how would you think the participants in a Spinning class would feel if one day a substitute instructor announced, "I'm a certified yoga instructor. I don't have any cycling certification, and I've never taught a Spinning class, but I have taken a few of them"?

Patrick
04-17-2006, 08:18 PM
To think about it another way, how would you think the participants in a Spinning class would feel if one day a substitute instructor announced, "I'm a certified yoga instructor. I don't have any cycling certification, and I've never taught a Spinning class, but I have taken a few of them"?

Point taken, sir.

MattF
04-18-2006, 09:41 PM
I think the subbing experience you had better prepared you for Yoga in the future. For whatever little things you do in the field now, it will make you better for when you do them in the future :)