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Patrick
04-01-2006, 09:48 AM
http://www.latina.com/latina/latinalife/latinalife.jsp?genre=healthfitness&article=newgymclasses

Read the part titled, "Ride-In Movie." While the article is a review of a "ride-in movie"-style IC class, I do not appreciate the parallels made between this class format and ALL IC classes. This kind of publicity is less than ideal for the attendance of our classes, you know?

I look forward to hearing everyone else's take on the article. And, if you're wondering how I found this article (being that it is from Latina magazine, my friend was reading it at school and in the actual magazine it has a picture of a girl on a Spin bike, so that caught my eye.

Patrick

britspin
04-01-2006, 01:04 PM
Patrick, here you go again getting defensive. I see your point, it is not a good article as far as publicity goes for IC classes in general, but, I think most folks would see thru the dismissive tone, and also see that it describes a particular style of class, my thoughts would (I hope) be, 'well Drive In sounds a bit dodgy, but how does is compare with Spinning/other IC classes at my gym?'
If someone asks you about it, you would easily shoot down the objections, without a thought and we are the front line educators, people listen to us, plus you can prove your classes & by extension other CI classes have nothing in common with that except a stationary bike, let them take a class.
Besides since when was finding Nemo a cycling movie?
Now an article in this months Triathlete magazine annoyed me...I may write in, to put the record straight.

Pink
04-01-2006, 01:34 PM
I don't need to battle this from a magazine article, I have to battle this from people taking IC classes in all the gyms surrounding my house. It is a constant job to spread the word (yes, and defend my passion) and discredit those teaching these kinds of classes. I just vow that I will teach the best classes I can, from profiles designed with purpose, coached safely and passionately.

At least the author of the article lets us know up-front that he's not a fan of biking. So, as BritSpin suggests, we know there's a bias. With that said, I guess it's also good that this didn't appear in Newsweek or Fitness.

rick316
04-01-2006, 04:33 PM
My honest take on the article?One word-hilarious!More calories had to be burned getting the bikes into the theatre than spinning,sorry,riding to Finding Nemo.(I can't imagine you'd burn many,but I haven't actually seen it:o )

But seriously,it sounds like my "induction" into the saddle-sore world of indoor cycling and I think I'm ok.I can agree with that feeling the first time of doing those damn jumps,I still can't do them when I ride a non-JG class! As for not liking David Lee Roth's voice yelling out "Jump"?whatsupwiththat? One of the greatest tracks of all time.
Just my 2 cents.:cool:

kszspin
04-01-2006, 05:21 PM
Patrick you are indeed passionate about Spinning and defending it's good name, so I applaud you for your zeal here! It is so unfortunate that the trademark name is lumped into conversation and description of ridiculous classes taught around the country. Crunch Gyms are notorious for the weird classes :eek: , y'all remember the cycling class a few years ago that involved stripping I think? Or was it an S &M class :eek: .
I feel for you guys in the big cities with the Crunch gyms around you, trying to keep the Spinning program safe and sound and when folks hear that you teach Spinning they think it's like a class at Crunch! Bless your hearts :) .

britspin
04-01-2006, 05:26 PM
S & M class, now you're talking, I love those little chocolate beans, oh no wait, ow, no, owww.

rick316
04-01-2006, 05:27 PM
, y'all remember the cycling class a few years ago that involved stripping I think? Or was it an S &M class :eek: .
I feel for you guys in the big cities :) .

I'm really curious about this one.Could you enlighten those of us still awake over here in the UK who don't know anything about Spin 'n' Strip in which big cities...I won't be able to get to sleep until you tell me,please.:)

Ps.I read Kelly's post first,Keith just happened to reply before me!

kszspin
04-01-2006, 05:37 PM
Why, oh why do I even bother :rolleyes: .

You're both very very bad! (there ya go for your 'one word, one phrase', for that type class).

rick316
04-01-2006, 05:40 PM
Huh?:confused: No,seriously.I'm curious who in their right mind would come up with a spin class where you strip? The continuity/flow would be non-existent.All the effort to achieve a reasonable working heart rate would be wasted (or would it potentially go too high?) I get the feeling that sometimes my questions are taken with a pinch of salt around here.:mad:

britspin
04-02-2006, 11:01 AM
I really am not seeing any ambiguity in stripping, or S&M, and yes we are both bad, bad boys.;)

britspin
04-02-2006, 11:05 AM
Apart from the M&M error..honestly genuine mishtake.

bikerchick2
04-02-2006, 02:10 PM
Patrick I read it as well. Hmmmmm, what can I say. Watching Nemo during a cycle class is a bit odd. I am sure people won't read this and think all IC classes are like that one.:cool: But I can see your point. Don't worry we all got your back...we are fighting all the bad press about IC. We are warriors of IC. Don't mess with us!

Robert
04-03-2006, 05:39 AM
Spin with S&M ?

Would it look something like Dodgeball?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/graphics/2004/09/22/film4.jpg

If so, I approve! :p

britspin
04-03-2006, 05:50 AM
Can you get those boots with spds & looks?

Robert
04-03-2006, 05:54 AM
Can you get those boots with spds & looks?

I'll have a look at my local "bike" shop in Soho... :D

britspin
04-03-2006, 06:02 AM
Careful...dark glasses, bike helmet pulled down, no flourescent gear..can't be too careful.

britspin
04-03-2006, 06:21 AM
I believe I mentioned an article in Triathlete magazine which I found a little off.
I found it out & present 'highlights' for you. It is spread over 2 pages so scanning would be a mare.
Spinning with The Man...by Barry Siff.
It begins with poor weather keeping triathletes indoors, rollers OK, but some folk schedule the occasional spin class. In Boulder Colo., on a Tues 7am, 'stop in at the Flatiron Athletic Club and experience how a spin class can become a training-program staple. The instructor? None other than The Man-six time Ironman Hawaii winner Dave Scott'.so far so good.
'Daves class is great-it's methodical, specific training, high intensity & very entertaining'
OK Ok...heres the science bit...not.
'People don't line up 45 minutes early simply for the humor.
This is not your typical spin class:no music (unless Dave chooses to swoon one of his favourite 1970s lounge songs), the instructor is not on a bike, nor is he a ''certified spinning instructor'' (something he regularly jokes about).'
It goes on all cyclists must wear HRM & know lactate thresholds, cadence is key, counted 6-8x per class.
Programme built upon progressive workload, specific monthly plans etc.
All good,, interesting progressions etc.
But why the 'funny' inverted commas spinning instructors? In a publication aimed squarely at 'athletes' of all levels it seems unnecessary, and implies that those in inverted commas could not do this type of plan or workout.
I think I shall e-mail them & set the record straight.

britspin
04-03-2006, 06:25 AM
Ooops, just found it on the website so you can read it in it's entirety...www.triathletemag.com/archives.cfm.

britspin
04-03-2006, 06:26 AM
..which does not seem to work...go to triathlete mag & search using Spinning with The Man...it's there.

britspin
04-03-2006, 06:44 AM
Heres my reply.
Dear Sir.
I found your article Spinning with The Man by Barry Siff a little condescending in its tone. Before you dismiss me as a humorless instructor, I understand that you were trying to get across the tone & spirit of Dave Scotts classes.
However the implication is that 'Certified Spinning Instructors' (and I also understand that some of them should be!), could not construct or lead such a class.
I of course must disagree, many of my colleagues are not only instructors but triathletes too, teaching classes comprising grannies to athletes in the same room at the same time, and still following a pro gressive programme based on cadences etc etc.
To maintain our certification we must update our knowledge with regular continuing education courses, and we of course learn from each other.
I would in no way seek to belittle Dave Scott..his record speaks for itself, but a joke in a room in Colorado is one thing, printing it in an internationally read magazine is quite another.
I wish I could say all Indoor Cycling Instructors were capable of such classes, sadly I cannot, but for those that do take this seriously, they do not deserve to be ridiculed in this way.
Please set the record straight and highlight the benefit of Indoor Cycling, and perhaps issue top tips for finding a great instructor.
Oh and music can be a huge motivator Dave!
Thanks for listening.
Keep on riding.

Pink
04-03-2006, 08:28 AM
Great "Back at 'em" Britspin. Wonder if you'll get a response?

alexkaboom
04-03-2006, 08:53 AM
Britspin, ... well done. I hope you do get a response and it is an apologetic one. Thank you for sticking up for us.

Alex

britspin
04-03-2006, 10:21 AM
I will keep you posted..see what I did there?

Patrick
04-03-2006, 10:33 AM
I will keep you posted..see what I did there?

Bravo, Britspin. All good points in your reply.... Let us be careful, though. We wouldn't want to go getting defensive again, would we? :p

britspin
04-03-2006, 10:40 AM
What me? Never.

megale3
04-03-2006, 12:11 PM
[Quote=magazine]The instructor started talking, but without a microphone, so I couldn't understand a word. I heard someone say, "Turn your crank to three." Huh? I looked at the woman next to me. She was turning the knob on her bike to the right, so I did the same. That made pedaling more difficult. But I wasn't sure how difficult a "three" should feel. The instructor said something else, and everyone stood up off their seats while continuing to pedal. So did I—and I immediately felt like I was about to tip over the handlebars. Then we started "jumping"—standing and sitting back down on the seat. Uh, problem: I couldn't figure out when to sit and when to stand. After 15 minutes, I gave up and rode slowly on my own, wondering how many calories fish burn while swimming. [Quote]

Let’s look at this from a newbie’s point of view.
1) Class is intimidating already - Jumps are intimidating especially 15 minutes of them.
2) New riders need to learn the lingo -crank? Knob? Standing up…did something that looked like blah blah blah
3) No microphone hard to hear don't understand.
4) The worst thing to do is make a class zone out on TV's movies, slid projectors! That is what the tractor seat recumbent in front of the TV’s are for out side -if you can't be more interesting than that oh my goodness.
5) Mind body and disassociations will begin weather the movie is playing or not.

I know Spinning instructors that do this stuff too; I know Schwinn instructors, Precision instructors and even Reaction instructors. It’s not just one sect that does this. If you are going to let the out side influences teach, this is what a new person is going to see and observe. It’s a gym not a movie theatre -people should and want a good, fun and challenging work out will get. Its up to you gang make it real or get a variety show.
Megale
Sorry had to vent its Monday and Daylight savings time

Vélo de s’allonger sucer

Robert
04-04-2006, 04:25 AM
Totally agree - sounds like the instructor was not very professional:

1 - a beginner left to his own devices, with no explanation as to what he should be doing? Very bad...
2 - no microphone, fair enough. But hand signals, anyone? :rolleyes:
3 - "Turn your crank to three". I've been cycling since I was 4 years old and yet I don't know what that means. I would've though the pedal cranks (i.e., horizontal in the 3/9 o'clock position) but never resistance! Bad presentational skills.
4 - All bikes have different resistance. Turning to "three" may make no diff if the person's on zero resistance. Lack of proper direction.
5 - "I felt I was about to tip over the handlebars". What was the instructor doing when this was happening? A verbal cue was needed, at the very least, to make sure he learned the proper technique.
6 - "Couldn't figure out when to sit and when to stand". Suggests the guy had no rhythm but, even so, a simple hand signal counting down "4...3...2...and up" would've sufficed.

This is not the fault of the program but the instructor not caring about his class. Lack of professionalism...:mad:


[quote=magazine]The instructor started talking, but without a microphone, so I couldn't understand a word. I heard someone say, "Turn your crank to three." Huh? I looked at the woman next to me. She was turning the knob on her bike to the right, so I did the same. That made pedaling more difficult. But I wasn't sure how difficult a "three" should feel. The instructor said something else, and everyone stood up off their seats while continuing to pedal. So did I—and I immediately felt like I was about to tip over the handlebars. Then we started "jumping"—standing and sitting back down on the seat. Uh, problem: I couldn't figure out when to sit and when to stand. After 15 minutes, I gave up and rode slowly on my own, wondering how many calories fish burn while swimming. [quote]

Pink
04-04-2006, 06:54 AM
I think I was in this class.

I went to an IC class at LA Fitness -- big, flashy corporate box. I introduced myself to the instructor as a JGSI, explaining that I had never been on a Keiser bike. When she didn't offer, I asked if she could set me up. She told me it was probably the same as I was used to and I should just adjust it until I was comfortable. I did, but still asked her to check my position.

The class was as described...gear 3, gear 2, gear 1. If I didn't have knowledge of IC, I would have been totally lost and probably riding unsafely. There was no direction at all. No HR parameters, no RPE, no form checks. Nothing.

I did get a mental workout though. It took all of my strength & resolve not to get off of the bike and correct form. People were either bouncing all over the place with no resistance or pedaling blocks from too much.

kszspin
04-04-2006, 08:23 AM
I did get a mental workout though. It took all of my strength & resolve not to get off of the bike and correct form. People were either bouncing all over the place with no resistance or pedaling blocks from too much.

Pink: I think I've been to some of those tough mental workout classes myself :D . All you keep thinking about is how much this class bites and just when you think it can't get worse he/she cues something ridiculous to do!

megale3
04-04-2006, 10:57 AM
I think I was in this class.

I went to an IC class I introduced myself to the instructor as a JGSI, explaining that I had never been on a Keiser bike. When she didn't offer, I asked if she could set me up. She told me it was probably the same as I was used to and I should just adjust it until I was comfortable. I did, but still asked her to check my position.

Pink did she check you? The thing about setting ones self up on a stationary bike is sort of like giving ones self a hair cut... You might look funny. It only takes seconds to set/check someone to a reasonable and safe ROM. I was wondering if she/he was intimidated by the fact that you were a peer and not a subordinate? Hell I would have let you teach :D
Megale

Legspeed
04-04-2006, 11:48 AM
I introduced myself to the instructor as a JGSI

Question: why would you do that other than to challenge her credentials and/or preen about your own?

JGSI...they're just so...so....French!

kszspin
04-04-2006, 11:59 AM
Legspeed:
I am sure Pink will also explain to you why she introduced herself as a JGSI, but I would as well have said that I am a JGSI to her. Not to boast, preen, or imply that a Keiser IC instructor is less of an instructor, BUT because the BIKE is soooo different and I would hope that by saying that, the other instructor would jump in and say, "well then let me help you get set up on this bike, it's a bit different than a spinner". :)
Apparently this particular instructor she had was not attentive to that or any other logical instructions to start someone off with a good IC experience. I believe then the class went downhill from there.....

megale3
04-04-2006, 12:00 PM
I think letting another instructor know that they are in the house is a good thing. How you do it is the question. And I don't think that Pink would be like snooty about it. I let other instructors know and they usually are really friendly and treat me bad on the bike and make me work harder :D OUCH! Do you guys let other instructors know? If you don't do you follow what they are saying to the tee? What if they do something that you are not willing to do? How suttle can you be about not doing it to keep the potential insult to a min.
Megale

kszspin
04-04-2006, 12:16 PM
I think letting another instructor know that they are in the house is a good thing. How you do it is the question. And I don't think that Pink would be like snooty about it. I let other instructors know and they usually are really friendly and treat me bad on the bike and make me work harder :D OUCH! Do you guys let other instructors know? If you don't do you follow what they are saying to the tee? What if they do something that you are not willing to do? How suttle can you be about not doing it to keep the potential insult to a min.
Megale

If when I'm out of town, visiting a club, never met the instructor then I do introduce myself as a Spinning instructor. I don't deviate from their profile to do my own thing unless it is dangerous (IMO or as I am trained). For instance, I'm not gonna bring my pedals to a halt in a standing position and "push off" or something, I'm not gonna hover or do push ups on my bike in their class, and I'm also not gonna stretch my legs standing in the pedals or up on the handlebars. Perhaps by NOT doing these movements I am calling attention to myself, BUT maybe it will open a conversation (if the instructor brings it up after class) that will give me a chance to explain why I chose not to do those movements.

megale3
04-04-2006, 12:42 PM
So could you fake a CI move? like just stand there on the pedals when they are stretching and yell oh man this feels good :D Or when the are doing push ups just move your head up and down ;)
Megale

Pink
04-04-2006, 12:43 PM
Yike, Legspeed, it didn't even occur to me that she would think I was boasting, etc. That certainly wasn't my intention. I just wanted her to know that although I had some general knowledge of IC, I was new to the Keiser bikes and routine. I went to her because in her room, she was the expert and I was the student. When I know someone is new (which essential I was), I am careful to be a little more descriptive with my instructions, etc.

And, yes, Megale, she did look over my set-up when I asked her to. I just wished I had some idea what she wanted when she said 'gear 3' etc. I mean, is gear 3 the top gear? Is there a gear 6? etc. In fact, I was curious to see how alike/different our methods were -- since I'm always looking to steal something from other instructors.

I certainly appreciate when another instructor comes to my classes and introduces themselves. I feel like we are fellow soldiers in the trenches, so to speak.

Pink
04-04-2006, 12:59 PM
Ya know, on second thought, maybe my tiara gave her the wrong impression...

megale3
04-04-2006, 01:01 PM
Yike, Legspeed, it didn't even occur to me that she would think I was boasting, etc. That certainly wasn't my intention. I just wanted her to know that although I had some general knowledge of IC, I was new to the Keiser bikes and routine. I went to her because in her room, she was the expert and I was the student. When I know someone is new (which essential I was), I am careful to be a little more descriptive with my instructions, etc.

And, yes, Megale, she did look over my set-up when I asked her to. I just wished I had some idea what she wanted when she said 'gear 3' etc. I mean, is gear 3 the top gear? Is there a gear 6? etc. In fact, I was curious to see how alike/different our methods were -- since I'm always looking to steal something from other instructors.

I certainly appreciate when another instructor comes to my classes and introduces themselves. I feel like we are fellow soldiers in the trenches, so to speak.


I always thank the coach after the class too :) and then try and ask for a high lite to what a cue that they used. I may asked where they got that great cue from or hey I really loved this or that. I don't want to make them feel anything but that they just gave me the best hour I could have spent. I will not interpret anything unless I am asked and then I may not cause its just not my place. I don't know about you guys but taking classes takes me back to the beginning and why I even started teaching and loose the fun of just taking them is beyond me sometimes. But it is the road we have gone.
Megale

megale3
04-04-2006, 01:02 PM
Ya know, on second thought, maybe my tiara gave her the wrong impression...


LOL lets see it lady!;)

alexkaboom
04-04-2006, 01:07 PM
I do think that it is just courtesy to introduce yourself to the instructor if you're taking a class.

Recently a new instructor (new to the club) took my class and she came over and introduced herself... I smiled and made sure she felt welcome... we talked at the end of the class and agreed to get together for coffee sometime... I didn't get the impression that she was boasting...

Alex

kszspin
04-04-2006, 01:38 PM
Mike,
I agree, thanking them for the class they gave you is always a must, EVEN if there were cringing moments in it. I think that just is out of respect for them as a fellow instructor and person :) . As far as not responding to a question about why I may not have participated in a certain move/stretch, then I really have no problem giving them my feedback. If they are asking then, I will tell. I look at it as maybe they really would like to have feedback from another instructor because they don't ever get it. When another instructor takes my class, I always ask for feedback right there on the spot, while it's fresh in their mind. We don't learn w/o asking. That's why we are here on this forum as well.
So can I come take your class, pretty please?

megale3
04-04-2006, 02:21 PM
Mike,
I agree, thanking them for the class they gave you is always a must, EVEN if there were cringing moments in it. I think that just is out of respect for them as a fellow instructor and person :) . As far as not responding to a question about why I may not have participated in a certain move/stretch, then I really have no problem giving them my feedback. If they are asking then, I will tell. I look at it as maybe they really would like to have feedback from another instructor because they don't ever get it. When another instructor takes my class, I always ask for feedback right there on the spot, while it's fresh in their mind. We don't learn w/o asking. That's why we are here on this forum as well.
So can I come take your class, pretty please?
Great point Kelly If they indeed want to know -then fine.
Hey if you show up at my class you are teachin kiddo ;) Give this old guy a break :cool:
M

Pink
04-04-2006, 04:21 PM
Hey, Kelly, road trip?

kszspin
04-04-2006, 07:08 PM
I would die for a road trip! But my family would say hold on a minute.....:mad:
I am thrilled that I am getting 'time off' for good behaviour to go to Miami again this year! DH and the little guy home alone for a week once a year is dicey as it is, but if I can ever wing it to go visit, I will. Are y'all anywhere near Hershey Pa? :p (See chocolate thread!)

Robert
04-05-2006, 05:15 AM
JGSI...they're just so...so....French!

That's a compliment where I come from! :cool:

If the instructor is so easily intimidated, then he/she is probably very insecure and not very sure of their technique. If I'm in a new class then I do introduce myself, if only to say "if I don't do something (e.g. a CI move), please ignore me as I'm not a newbie". And I usually sit at the back of the class, so that others in the class won't be distracted by this guy who refuses to sprint at 130+rpm.

Like most others, I wouldn't dare criticise another instructor but, if asked, I will say something like "I don't do standing sprints with no resistance in my classes as the lack of resistance can lead to bursitis, HR doesn't go up that high anyway and doesn't do much to actually improve fitness". And then we usually have a quick discussion about different techniques, etc., only to find that the next time I sit in that person's class, they don't do those sprints anymore!

There's always room to learn - I bet even Johnny G could pick up a few tips from Lance! :D

bodyimaje
03-23-2007, 03:07 PM
http://www.latina.com/latina/latinalife/latinalife.jsp?genre=healthfitness&article=newgymclasses

Read the part titled, "Ride-In Movie." While the article is a review of a "ride-in movie"-style IC class, I do not appreciate the parallels made between this class format and ALL IC classes. This kind of publicity is less than ideal for the attendance of our classes, you know?

I look forward to hearing everyone else's take on the article. And, if you're wondering how I found this article (being that it is from Latina magazine, my friend was reading it at school and in the actual magazine it has a picture of a girl on a Spin bike, so that caught my eye.

Patrick

Wow, that's pretty intense. This Student really had a terrible experience. I feel bad for her. I hope the actual instructor teaching that class, gets to read this article. As much as the Studen'ts complaints seem to be against the CI program itself, but we all know the reason she didn't enjoy this class was because of who and how it was lead.
I don't feel the need to defend Indoor cycling since it is a very famous program. Ideally: This Student should give IC a second chance and hopefully she'll get treated better as a beginner....(Beginner members are very important to me, and my coaching, music/profile etc plays a big role in scaring them away or making them addicted to IC)