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yumipon
06-22-2011, 04:52 PM
Does anybody use hand position 3 while seated, advise students to do it? I'm trying to clarify as I get different stories. I know some of you do not care about the hand position and recommend them to keep their hands where they feel comfortable. I'm just curious to know how many of you tell your students to chose HP3 while seated.:)

Funhog
06-22-2011, 08:36 PM
Does anybody use hand position 3 while seated, advise students to do it? I'm trying to clarify as I get different stories. I know some of you do not care about the hand position and recommend them to keep their hands where they feel comfortable. I'm just curious to know how many of you tell your students to chose HP3 while seated.:)

Unless someone is very tall with very long arms (like over 6'5" or so) having your hands on the bar ends is not good form. For the vast majority of people, it causes you to extend far too much, potentially causing discomfort in the shoulders and neck. Being that stretched out also compresses the trunk, limiting breathing, and causes the rider to hyperextend the neck in order to look up.

It's not recommended. You say you're getting different stories; are these people telling you it's ok certified? Most good certifying companies talk about good hand placement and not being too stretched out. I'm not sure why anyone would recommend that you do ride there when seated.

PedalFaster
06-22-2011, 09:10 PM
No.
........

Todd S
06-23-2011, 01:57 AM
For your riders that are into "keeping it real", make sure they don't confuse 'low' with 'stretched out'.

The current fad with racers (thanks to John Cobb) is a very aggressive and low position, but it's on a slightly undersized frame with a short stem. It's low but not stretched out.

http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/251149_10150207402287556_831792555_6912478_1304702 _n.jpg[/img]g"]http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/251149_10150207402287556_831792555_6912478_1304702 _n.jpg

Indoors the advantage of 'low' is glute involvement, but it's not for your average non-athletic rider who's carrying a pony keg rather than a six-pack.

Comfort is probably the key in a spinning class. If it's comfortable it's most probably OK. If the rider is doing it to look cool it's probably not.

yumipon
06-23-2011, 07:37 AM
I'm glad to hear from you guys to confirm about Hand position 3. It was a bit confusing to hear from the master instructor from Keiser saying as follows:

I'll be pleased to hear more from you guys based on what it is said here.:)
------------------------------------------------------------
Hi Yumiko,

I am glad you got my reply. You do not need to stand in hand position 3, you can stand in hand position 3. This is an aggressive position so you can be standing or sitting in this position.

If someone has a broad chest, large breast tissue or collapses inwards into the shoulders then use hand position 3 instead of the time trialing grips. This would be at the same distance and have the same body position as someone in the time trialing position but is a little wider for the chest.

I hope this clarifies your question. Let me know if it doesn't.
Suzette
On 11-Jun-11, at 6:58 PM, Yumiko wrote:



Suzette,

Thank you very much for the reply. The only other clarification I need then would be why hand position 3 is suggested in place of time trialing grips. Hand position 3 is not for the seated position. Please refer to page 11 of the manual. It states, “If a cyclists has poor form, remain in hand position3”. This does not make sense. The suggestion should be hand position 1 or 2 in place of 3 as we are seated.

Appreciate your opinion.

Best regards,

Yumifitness4u2@pacbell.net
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vivienne
06-23-2011, 07:37 AM
Indoors the advantage of 'low' is glute involvement, but it's not for your average non-athletic rider who's carrying a pony keg rather than a six-pack.

Comfort is probably the key in a spinning class. If it's comfortable it's most probably OK. If the rider is doing it to look cool it's probably not.


Addining it to the armamentarium.

Vivienne

Vivienne
06-23-2011, 07:56 AM
Just as an FYI for anyone who reads a *name* or reference in one of Todd's posts, it'd behoove you to check it out. Over the past half hour (when I shouldda been working on my own training) I've found out something about John Cobb. Not sayin' that my ignorance is necessarily an indicator of everyone else's standard, but I like to find out stuff I didn't know "before"

I'm assuming this John Cobb is not the theologian, BTW


Vivienne.....learned 2 new things plus a "new cue" today and I'm still in my bathrobe

Vivienne
06-23-2011, 08:05 AM
So....I think my new description for that scrunched up body with the parked out hands is now going to be John Cobb channeling Desmond Morris (from my youth;) )

http://www.televisionheaven.co.uk/zootime.htm

....otherwise known as a Hunter Kemper wannabee with arms like an Orang-Utan.

Vivienne....channeling Mencken http://www.1-famous-quotes.com/quote/1150782

Todd S
06-23-2011, 10:59 AM
To be clear, I was talking about this John Cobb,

http://cobbcycling.com/

:)

Vivienne
06-23-2011, 01:13 PM
To be clear, I was talking about this John Cobb,

http://cobbcycling.com/

:)

Just out of interest....is there a touch of the theologian about this John Cobb?

The only reason I ask is that I don't have any sort of knowledge based "feel" for this technical side of racing biomechanics stc so it'd be as easy to sell flim-flam of this nature to me (if, in fact it is) as, say, SportLegs or homeopathy or whatnot to an audience that didn't have a grasp for physiology, biochemistry etc.

Doubt it'll make me go any faster but just looking to know what I don't know (or what I know that just ain't so)

Vivienne

Todd S
06-23-2011, 01:24 PM
Just out of interest....is there a touch of the theologian about this John Cobb?

The only reason I ask is that I don't have any sort of knowledge based "feel" for this technical side of racing biomechanics stc so it'd be as easy to sell flim-flam of this nature to me (if, in fact it is) as, say, SportLegs or homeopathy or whatnot to an audience that didn't have a grasp for physiology, biochemistry etc.

Doubt it'll make me go any faster but just looking to know what I don't know (or what I know that just ain't so)

Vivienne

This one's an aerodynamics guru. In cycling, aero is everything. I'm guessing this type of fit will lower one's drag if you have the fitness to ride like that.

Funhog
06-23-2011, 07:48 PM
This rider, though aggressive, still has his shoulders over his elbows, so he is not "stretched out" like I am referring to. Reaching forward towards the end of the bars so that the angle at the shoulders exceeds 90 degrees (elbows way forward of the shoulders) is stretched out.


For your riders that are into "keeping it real", make sure they don't confuse 'low' with 'stretched out'.

The current fad with racers (thanks to John Cobb) is a very aggressive and low position, but it's on a slightly undersized frame with a short stem. It's low but not stretched out.

http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/251149_10150207402287556_831792555_6912478_1304702 _n.jpg[/img]g"]http://a2.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/251149_10150207402287556_831792555_6912478_1304702 _n.jpg

Indoors the advantage of 'low' is glute involvement, but it's not for your average non-athletic rider who's carrying a pony keg rather than a six-pack.

Comfort is probably the key in a spinning class. If it's comfortable it's most probably OK. If the rider is doing it to look cool it's probably not.